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Glycolipid metabolic status of overweight/obese adolescents aged 9- to 15-year-old and the BMI-SDS/BMI cut-off value of predicting dyslipidemiain boys, Shanghai, China: a cross-sectional study.
Lipids Health Dis. 2013 Aug 28; 12:129.LH

Abstract

BACKGROUND

The prevalence of adolescents' obesity and overweight has dramatically elevated in China. Obese children were likely to insulin resistance and dyslipidemia, which are risk factors of cardiovascular diseases. However there was no cut-off point of anthropometric values to predict the risk factors in Chinese adolescents. The present study was to investigate glycolipid metabolism status of adolescents in Shanghai and to explore the correlations between body mass index standard deviation score (BMI-SDS) and metabolic indices, determine the best cut-off value of BMI-SDS to predict dyslipidemia.

METHODS

Fifteen schools in Shanghai's two districts were chosen by cluster sampling and primary screening was done in children aged 9-15 years old. After screening of bodyweight and height, overweight and obese adolescents and age-matched children with normal body weight were randomly recruited in the study. Anthropometric measurements, biochemical measurements of glycolipid profiles were done. SPSS19.0 was used to analyze the data. Receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curves were made and the best cut-off values of BMI-SDS to predict dyslipidemia were determined while the Youden indices were maximum.

RESULTS

Five hundred and thirty-eight adolescents were enrolled in this research, among which 283 have normal bodyweight, 115 were overweight and 140 were obese. No significant differences of the ages among 3 groups were found. There were significant differences of WC-SDS (p<0.001), triacylglycerol (p<0.05), high and low density lipoprotein cholesterol (p<0.01), fasting insulin (p<0.01) and C-peptide (p<0.001) among 3 groups. Significant difference of fasting glucose was only found between normal weight and overweight group. Significant difference of total cholesterol was found between obese and normal weight group. There was no significant difference of glycated hemoglobin among 3 groups. The same tendency was found in boys but not in girls. Only HDL-C reduced and TG increased while BMI elevated in girls. The best cut-off value of BMI-SDS was 1.22 to predict dyslipidemia in boys. The BMI cut-off was 21.67 in boys.

CONCLUSION

Overweight and obese youths had reduced insulin sensitivity and high prevalence of dyslipidemia.When BMI-SDS elevated up to 1.22 and BMI was higher than 21.67 in boys, dyslipidemia may happen.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Department of Child Health Care, Children's Hospital of Fudan University, Shanghai 201102, China. ympeng@fudan.edu.cn.No affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't

Language

eng

PubMed ID

23984682

Citation

Gong, Chun-dan, et al. "Glycolipid Metabolic Status of Overweight/obese Adolescents Aged 9- to 15-year-old and the BMI-SDS/BMI Cut-off Value of Predicting Dyslipidemiain Boys, Shanghai, China: a Cross-sectional Study." Lipids in Health and Disease, vol. 12, 2013, p. 129.
Gong CD, Wu QL, Chen Z, et al. Glycolipid metabolic status of overweight/obese adolescents aged 9- to 15-year-old and the BMI-SDS/BMI cut-off value of predicting dyslipidemiain boys, Shanghai, China: a cross-sectional study. Lipids Health Dis. 2013;12:129.
Gong, C. D., Wu, Q. L., Chen, Z., Zhang, D., Zhao, Z. Y., & Peng, Y. M. (2013). Glycolipid metabolic status of overweight/obese adolescents aged 9- to 15-year-old and the BMI-SDS/BMI cut-off value of predicting dyslipidemiain boys, Shanghai, China: a cross-sectional study. Lipids in Health and Disease, 12, 129. https://doi.org/10.1186/1476-511X-12-129
Gong CD, et al. Glycolipid Metabolic Status of Overweight/obese Adolescents Aged 9- to 15-year-old and the BMI-SDS/BMI Cut-off Value of Predicting Dyslipidemiain Boys, Shanghai, China: a Cross-sectional Study. Lipids Health Dis. 2013 Aug 28;12:129. PubMed PMID: 23984682.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Glycolipid metabolic status of overweight/obese adolescents aged 9- to 15-year-old and the BMI-SDS/BMI cut-off value of predicting dyslipidemiain boys, Shanghai, China: a cross-sectional study. AU - Gong,Chun-dan, AU - Wu,Qiao-ling, AU - Chen,Zheng, AU - Zhang,Dan, AU - Zhao,Zheng-yan, AU - Peng,Yong-mei, Y1 - 2013/08/28/ PY - 2013/06/27/received PY - 2013/08/23/accepted PY - 2013/8/30/entrez PY - 2013/8/30/pubmed PY - 2014/7/9/medline SP - 129 EP - 129 JF - Lipids in health and disease JO - Lipids Health Dis VL - 12 N2 - BACKGROUND: The prevalence of adolescents' obesity and overweight has dramatically elevated in China. Obese children were likely to insulin resistance and dyslipidemia, which are risk factors of cardiovascular diseases. However there was no cut-off point of anthropometric values to predict the risk factors in Chinese adolescents. The present study was to investigate glycolipid metabolism status of adolescents in Shanghai and to explore the correlations between body mass index standard deviation score (BMI-SDS) and metabolic indices, determine the best cut-off value of BMI-SDS to predict dyslipidemia. METHODS: Fifteen schools in Shanghai's two districts were chosen by cluster sampling and primary screening was done in children aged 9-15 years old. After screening of bodyweight and height, overweight and obese adolescents and age-matched children with normal body weight were randomly recruited in the study. Anthropometric measurements, biochemical measurements of glycolipid profiles were done. SPSS19.0 was used to analyze the data. Receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curves were made and the best cut-off values of BMI-SDS to predict dyslipidemia were determined while the Youden indices were maximum. RESULTS: Five hundred and thirty-eight adolescents were enrolled in this research, among which 283 have normal bodyweight, 115 were overweight and 140 were obese. No significant differences of the ages among 3 groups were found. There were significant differences of WC-SDS (p<0.001), triacylglycerol (p<0.05), high and low density lipoprotein cholesterol (p<0.01), fasting insulin (p<0.01) and C-peptide (p<0.001) among 3 groups. Significant difference of fasting glucose was only found between normal weight and overweight group. Significant difference of total cholesterol was found between obese and normal weight group. There was no significant difference of glycated hemoglobin among 3 groups. The same tendency was found in boys but not in girls. Only HDL-C reduced and TG increased while BMI elevated in girls. The best cut-off value of BMI-SDS was 1.22 to predict dyslipidemia in boys. The BMI cut-off was 21.67 in boys. CONCLUSION: Overweight and obese youths had reduced insulin sensitivity and high prevalence of dyslipidemia.When BMI-SDS elevated up to 1.22 and BMI was higher than 21.67 in boys, dyslipidemia may happen. SN - 1476-511X UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/23984682/Glycolipid_metabolic_status_of_overweight/obese_adolescents_aged_9__to_15_year_old_and_the_BMI_SDS/BMI_cut_off_value_of_predicting_dyslipidemiain_boys_Shanghai_China:_a_cross_sectional_study_ L2 - https://lipidworld.biomedcentral.com/articles/10.1186/1476-511X-12-129 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -