Tags

Type your tag names separated by a space and hit enter

Omega-3 fatty acids and cardiovascular risk.
J Miss State Med Assoc 2013; 54(6):156-7JM

Abstract

BACKGROUND

Omega-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFA's) have an FDA indication for triglyceride lowering in patients with hypertriglyceridemia. Some European agencies have also approved omega-3 fatty acids for cardiovascular risk modification. Several major societies in the US also recommend their use following myocardial infarction.

OBJECTIVE

The purpose of this review was to assimilate available evidence from randomized controlled trials into one systematic review to determine the association between omega-3 fatty acids and cardiovascular outcomes.

DESIGN

Systematic review of randomized, controlled trials with meta-analysis

METHODS

PubMed, EMBASE, and the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (up to August 2012) were searched using a predefined algorithm. All randomized trials evaluating omega-3 polyunsaturated fatty acid supplementation in adults were considered. Trials selected were all randomized, controlled against another diet or placebo, and implemented in primary or secondary cardiovascular disease (CVD) prevention settings. Trials with duration less than 1 year were excluded. Outcomes eligible for review included all-cause mortality, cardiac death, sudden death, MI, and all types of stroke. Fatty acids could be given through diet or through supplements. Additionally, references listed in reviews were screened. Two investigators independently extracted data. Another investigator resolved discrepancies.

RESULTS

After retrieving 3,625 citations, 20 studies involving 68,680 participants were included. Two trials used dietary counseling to provide omega-3 fatty acids. The rest used supplements. In the 2 trials using dietary fatty acids, all-cause mortality and cardiac death were assessed and showed associations in opposite directions; therefore, with these discrepancies, quantitative synthesis of these trials was not performed.

Authors

No affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Comment

Language

eng

PubMed ID

23991511

Citation

Kruse, Leslie G., and Richard L. Ogletree. "Omega-3 Fatty Acids and Cardiovascular Risk." Journal of the Mississippi State Medical Association, vol. 54, no. 6, 2013, pp. 156-7.
Kruse LG, Ogletree RL. Omega-3 fatty acids and cardiovascular risk. J Miss State Med Assoc. 2013;54(6):156-7.
Kruse, L. G., & Ogletree, R. L. (2013). Omega-3 fatty acids and cardiovascular risk. Journal of the Mississippi State Medical Association, 54(6), pp. 156-7.
Kruse LG, Ogletree RL. Omega-3 Fatty Acids and Cardiovascular Risk. J Miss State Med Assoc. 2013;54(6):156-7. PubMed PMID: 23991511.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Omega-3 fatty acids and cardiovascular risk. AU - Kruse,Leslie G, AU - Ogletree,Richard L,Jr PY - 2013/9/3/entrez PY - 2013/9/3/pubmed PY - 2013/9/21/medline SP - 156 EP - 7 JF - Journal of the Mississippi State Medical Association JO - J Miss State Med Assoc VL - 54 IS - 6 N2 - BACKGROUND: Omega-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFA's) have an FDA indication for triglyceride lowering in patients with hypertriglyceridemia. Some European agencies have also approved omega-3 fatty acids for cardiovascular risk modification. Several major societies in the US also recommend their use following myocardial infarction. OBJECTIVE: The purpose of this review was to assimilate available evidence from randomized controlled trials into one systematic review to determine the association between omega-3 fatty acids and cardiovascular outcomes. DESIGN: Systematic review of randomized, controlled trials with meta-analysis METHODS: PubMed, EMBASE, and the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (up to August 2012) were searched using a predefined algorithm. All randomized trials evaluating omega-3 polyunsaturated fatty acid supplementation in adults were considered. Trials selected were all randomized, controlled against another diet or placebo, and implemented in primary or secondary cardiovascular disease (CVD) prevention settings. Trials with duration less than 1 year were excluded. Outcomes eligible for review included all-cause mortality, cardiac death, sudden death, MI, and all types of stroke. Fatty acids could be given through diet or through supplements. Additionally, references listed in reviews were screened. Two investigators independently extracted data. Another investigator resolved discrepancies. RESULTS: After retrieving 3,625 citations, 20 studies involving 68,680 participants were included. Two trials used dietary counseling to provide omega-3 fatty acids. The rest used supplements. In the 2 trials using dietary fatty acids, all-cause mortality and cardiac death were assessed and showed associations in opposite directions; therefore, with these discrepancies, quantitative synthesis of these trials was not performed. SN - 0026-6396 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/23991511/Omega_3_fatty_acids_and_cardiovascular_risk_ L2 - https://medlineplus.gov/dietarysupplements.html DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -