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Evaluating the sustainability of ceramic filters for point-of-use drinking water treatment.
Environ Sci Technol. 2013 Oct 01; 47(19):11206-13.ES

Abstract

This study evaluates the social, economic, and environmental sustainability of ceramic filters impregnated with silver nanoparticles for point-of-use (POU) drinking water treatment in developing countries. The functional unit for this analysis was the amount of water consumed by a typical household over ten years (37,960 L), as delivered by either the POU technology or a centralized water treatment and distribution system. Results indicate that the ceramic filters are 3-6 times more cost-effective than the centralized water system for reduction of waterborne diarrheal illness among the general population and children under five. The ceramic filters also exhibit better environmental performance for four of five evaluated life cycle impacts: energy use, water use, global warming potential, and particulate matter emissions (PM10). For smog formation potential, the centralized system is preferable to the ceramic filter POU technology. This convergence of social, economic, and environmental criteria offers clear indication that the ceramic filter POU technology is a more sustainable choice for drinking water treatment in developing countries than the centralized treatment systems that have been widely adopted in industrialized countries.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering, University of Virginia , Charlottesville, Virginia, 22904 United States.No affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't

Language

eng

PubMed ID

23991752

Citation

Ren, Dianjun, et al. "Evaluating the Sustainability of Ceramic Filters for Point-of-use Drinking Water Treatment." Environmental Science & Technology, vol. 47, no. 19, 2013, pp. 11206-13.
Ren D, Colosi LM, Smith JA. Evaluating the sustainability of ceramic filters for point-of-use drinking water treatment. Environ Sci Technol. 2013;47(19):11206-13.
Ren, D., Colosi, L. M., & Smith, J. A. (2013). Evaluating the sustainability of ceramic filters for point-of-use drinking water treatment. Environmental Science & Technology, 47(19), 11206-13. https://doi.org/10.1021/es4026084
Ren D, Colosi LM, Smith JA. Evaluating the Sustainability of Ceramic Filters for Point-of-use Drinking Water Treatment. Environ Sci Technol. 2013 Oct 1;47(19):11206-13. PubMed PMID: 23991752.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Evaluating the sustainability of ceramic filters for point-of-use drinking water treatment. AU - Ren,Dianjun, AU - Colosi,Lisa M, AU - Smith,James A, Y1 - 2013/09/18/ PY - 2013/9/3/entrez PY - 2013/9/3/pubmed PY - 2014/5/6/medline SP - 11206 EP - 13 JF - Environmental science & technology JO - Environ Sci Technol VL - 47 IS - 19 N2 - This study evaluates the social, economic, and environmental sustainability of ceramic filters impregnated with silver nanoparticles for point-of-use (POU) drinking water treatment in developing countries. The functional unit for this analysis was the amount of water consumed by a typical household over ten years (37,960 L), as delivered by either the POU technology or a centralized water treatment and distribution system. Results indicate that the ceramic filters are 3-6 times more cost-effective than the centralized water system for reduction of waterborne diarrheal illness among the general population and children under five. The ceramic filters also exhibit better environmental performance for four of five evaluated life cycle impacts: energy use, water use, global warming potential, and particulate matter emissions (PM10). For smog formation potential, the centralized system is preferable to the ceramic filter POU technology. This convergence of social, economic, and environmental criteria offers clear indication that the ceramic filter POU technology is a more sustainable choice for drinking water treatment in developing countries than the centralized treatment systems that have been widely adopted in industrialized countries. SN - 1520-5851 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/23991752/Evaluating_the_sustainability_of_ceramic_filters_for_point_of_use_drinking_water_treatment_ L2 - https://doi.org/10.1021/es4026084 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -