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Dose-dependent effects of evening primrose oil in children and adolescents with atopic dermatitis.

Abstract

BACKGROUND

Previous clinical trials with evening primrose oil in atopic dermatitis (AD) treatment have shown different results. In addition, the optimal dose and duration of treatment with evening primrose oil have not yet been determined.

OBJECTIVE

The aim of this study is to investigate the dose-response treatment effects of evening primrose oil on clinical symptoms of AD and serum concentrations of polyunsaturated fatty acids.

METHODS

Forty AD patients were enrolled for the study and randomly divided into 2 groups: those who received evening primrose oil 160 mg daily for 8 weeks and those who received 320 mg of evening primrose oil twice daily for 8 weeks. We evaluated the Eczema Area Severity Index (EASI) scores of all AD patients at weeks 0, 2, 4 and 8. In addition, we measured the levels of serum fatty acids, including C16 : 0 (palmitic), C18 : 2n (linoleic), C18 : 3n (linolenic) and C20 : 4 (arachidonic acid) using gas chromatography.

RESULTS

The serum fatty acid levels C18 : 3n and C20 : 4 were higher in the 320 mg group than in the 160 mg group, with statistical significance. After evening primrose oil treatment, EASI scores were reduced in the 2 groups. The improvement in EASI scores was greater in the 320 mg group than in the 160 mg group. There were no side effects seen in either group during the study in the 2 groups.

CONCLUSION

The results of this study suggest that the 320 mg and 160 mg groups may be equally effective in treating AD patients and show dose-dependent effects on serum fatty acid levels and EASI scores.

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  • Authors+Show Affiliations

    ,

    Department of Dermatology, Kangnam Sacred Heart Hospital, College of Medicine, Hallym University, Seoul, Korea.

    , , , , ,

    Source

    Annals of dermatology 25:3 2013 Aug pg 285-91

    Pub Type(s)

    Journal Article

    Language

    eng

    PubMed ID

    24003269

    Citation

    Chung, Bo Young, et al. "Dose-dependent Effects of Evening Primrose Oil in Children and Adolescents With Atopic Dermatitis." Annals of Dermatology, vol. 25, no. 3, 2013, pp. 285-91.
    Chung BY, Kim JH, Cho SI, et al. Dose-dependent effects of evening primrose oil in children and adolescents with atopic dermatitis. Ann Dermatol. 2013;25(3):285-91.
    Chung, B. Y., Kim, J. H., Cho, S. I., Ahn, I. S., Kim, H. O., Park, C. W., & Lee, C. H. (2013). Dose-dependent effects of evening primrose oil in children and adolescents with atopic dermatitis. Annals of Dermatology, 25(3), pp. 285-91. doi:10.5021/ad.2013.25.3.285.
    Chung BY, et al. Dose-dependent Effects of Evening Primrose Oil in Children and Adolescents With Atopic Dermatitis. Ann Dermatol. 2013;25(3):285-91. PubMed PMID: 24003269.
    * Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
    TY - JOUR T1 - Dose-dependent effects of evening primrose oil in children and adolescents with atopic dermatitis. AU - Chung,Bo Young, AU - Kim,Jin Hye, AU - Cho,Soo Ick, AU - Ahn,In Su, AU - Kim,Hye One, AU - Park,Chun Wook, AU - Lee,Cheol Heon, Y1 - 2013/08/13/ PY - 2011/12/27/received PY - 2012/06/07/revised PY - 2012/06/09/accepted PY - 2013/9/5/entrez PY - 2013/9/5/pubmed PY - 2013/9/5/medline KW - Atopic dermatitis KW - Evening primrose oil KW - Gamma-linolenic acid SP - 285 EP - 91 JF - Annals of dermatology JO - Ann Dermatol VL - 25 IS - 3 N2 - BACKGROUND: Previous clinical trials with evening primrose oil in atopic dermatitis (AD) treatment have shown different results. In addition, the optimal dose and duration of treatment with evening primrose oil have not yet been determined. OBJECTIVE: The aim of this study is to investigate the dose-response treatment effects of evening primrose oil on clinical symptoms of AD and serum concentrations of polyunsaturated fatty acids. METHODS: Forty AD patients were enrolled for the study and randomly divided into 2 groups: those who received evening primrose oil 160 mg daily for 8 weeks and those who received 320 mg of evening primrose oil twice daily for 8 weeks. We evaluated the Eczema Area Severity Index (EASI) scores of all AD patients at weeks 0, 2, 4 and 8. In addition, we measured the levels of serum fatty acids, including C16 : 0 (palmitic), C18 : 2n (linoleic), C18 : 3n (linolenic) and C20 : 4 (arachidonic acid) using gas chromatography. RESULTS: The serum fatty acid levels C18 : 3n and C20 : 4 were higher in the 320 mg group than in the 160 mg group, with statistical significance. After evening primrose oil treatment, EASI scores were reduced in the 2 groups. The improvement in EASI scores was greater in the 320 mg group than in the 160 mg group. There were no side effects seen in either group during the study in the 2 groups. CONCLUSION: The results of this study suggest that the 320 mg and 160 mg groups may be equally effective in treating AD patients and show dose-dependent effects on serum fatty acid levels and EASI scores. SN - 1013-9087 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/24003269/Dose_dependent_effects_of_evening_primrose_oil_in_children_and_adolescents_with_atopic_dermatitis_ L2 - https://anndermatol.org/DOIx.php?id=10.5021/ad.2013.25.3.285 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -