Tags

Type your tag names separated by a space and hit enter

Measuring effectiveness of semantic cues in degraded English sentences in non-native listeners.
Int J Audiol. 2014 Jan; 53(1):30-9.IJ

Abstract

OBJECTIVE

This study employed Boothroyd and Nittrouer's k (1988) to directly quantify effectiveness in native versus non-native listeners' use of semantic cues.

DESIGN

Listeners were presented speech-perception-in-noise sentences processed at three levels of concurrent multi-talker babble and reverberation. For each condition, 50 sentences with multiple semantic cues and 50 with minimum semantic cues were randomly presented. Listeners verbally reported and wrote down the target words. The metric, k, was derived from percent-correct scores for sentences with and without semantics.

STUDY SAMPLE

Ten native and 33 non-native listeners participated.

RESULTS

The presence of semantics increased recognition benefit by over 250% for natives, but access to semantics remained limited for non-native listeners (90-135%). The k was comparable across conditions for native listeners, but level-dependent for non-natives. The k for non-natives was significantly different from 1 in all conditions, suggesting semantic cues, though reduced in importance in difficult conditions, were helpful for non-natives.

CONCLUSIONS

Non-natives as a group were not as effective in using semantics to facilitate English sentence recognition as natives. Poor listening conditions were particularly adverse to the use of semantics in non-natives, who may rely on clear acoustic-phonetic cues before benefitting from semantic cues when recognizing connected speech.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Department of Communication Sciences & Disorders, Long Island University , Brooklyn Campus, New York , USA.

Pub Type(s)

Comparative Study
Journal Article

Language

eng

PubMed ID

24003982

Citation

Shi, Lu-Feng. "Measuring Effectiveness of Semantic Cues in Degraded English Sentences in Non-native Listeners." International Journal of Audiology, vol. 53, no. 1, 2014, pp. 30-9.
Shi LF. Measuring effectiveness of semantic cues in degraded English sentences in non-native listeners. Int J Audiol. 2014;53(1):30-9.
Shi, L. F. (2014). Measuring effectiveness of semantic cues in degraded English sentences in non-native listeners. International Journal of Audiology, 53(1), 30-9. https://doi.org/10.3109/14992027.2013.825052
Shi LF. Measuring Effectiveness of Semantic Cues in Degraded English Sentences in Non-native Listeners. Int J Audiol. 2014;53(1):30-9. PubMed PMID: 24003982.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Measuring effectiveness of semantic cues in degraded English sentences in non-native listeners. A1 - Shi,Lu-Feng, Y1 - 2013/09/05/ PY - 2013/9/6/entrez PY - 2013/9/6/pubmed PY - 2014/9/11/medline SP - 30 EP - 9 JF - International journal of audiology JO - Int J Audiol VL - 53 IS - 1 N2 - OBJECTIVE: This study employed Boothroyd and Nittrouer's k (1988) to directly quantify effectiveness in native versus non-native listeners' use of semantic cues. DESIGN: Listeners were presented speech-perception-in-noise sentences processed at three levels of concurrent multi-talker babble and reverberation. For each condition, 50 sentences with multiple semantic cues and 50 with minimum semantic cues were randomly presented. Listeners verbally reported and wrote down the target words. The metric, k, was derived from percent-correct scores for sentences with and without semantics. STUDY SAMPLE: Ten native and 33 non-native listeners participated. RESULTS: The presence of semantics increased recognition benefit by over 250% for natives, but access to semantics remained limited for non-native listeners (90-135%). The k was comparable across conditions for native listeners, but level-dependent for non-natives. The k for non-natives was significantly different from 1 in all conditions, suggesting semantic cues, though reduced in importance in difficult conditions, were helpful for non-natives. CONCLUSIONS: Non-natives as a group were not as effective in using semantics to facilitate English sentence recognition as natives. Poor listening conditions were particularly adverse to the use of semantics in non-natives, who may rely on clear acoustic-phonetic cues before benefitting from semantic cues when recognizing connected speech. SN - 1708-8186 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/24003982/Measuring_effectiveness_of_semantic_cues_in_degraded_English_sentences_in_non_native_listeners_ L2 - http://www.tandfonline.com/doi/full/10.3109/14992027.2013.825052 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -