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The influence of maternal optimality and infant temperament on parenting stress at 12 months among mothers with substance abuse and psychiatric problems.
Scand J Psychol. 2013 Oct; 54(5):353-62.SJ

Abstract

The present prospective longitudinal study aimed to investigate the long-term impact of maternal optimality assessed during pregnancy on parenting stress at infant age 12 months. In this study the concept of optimality was utilized to investigate maternal variations regarding resources during pregnancy in relation to later parenting stress, among three different groups of mothers that were recruited from substance abuse treatment, psychiatric outpatient treatment and well-baby clinics respectively. The influence of infant temperament on parenting stress was also examined. All mothers were interviewed during pregnancy. At 12 months, infant temperament (Colorado Childhood Temperament Inventory; Rowe & Plomin, 1977) and stress in the parent and child domain (Parenting Stress Index; Abidin, 1955) were assessed. Results demonstrated higher levels of parenting stress among mothers in the clinical groups, compared to the non-clinical group. Furthermore, it was the maternal psychiatric optimality index in combination with child temperament characteristics (child emotionality) that contributed uniquely to stress in the parent domain, while stress in the child domain was significantly associated only with child temperament characteristics (both child emotionality and soothability). The association between maternal psychiatric optimality assessed in pregnancy, infant temperament and parenting stress when the infants were 12 months old, points to the importance of simultaneously addressing the mothers' own psychological distress, and to support positive mother-infant interactions. Each woman's individual optimality profile may be used to display needs of follow-up in order to prevent enduring effects of non-optimality on parenting stress.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Department of Psychology, University of Oslo, Oslo, Norway. torill.siqveland@psykologi.uio.noNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't

Language

eng

PubMed ID

24004246

Citation

Siqveland, Torill S., et al. "The Influence of Maternal Optimality and Infant Temperament On Parenting Stress at 12 Months Among Mothers With Substance Abuse and Psychiatric Problems." Scandinavian Journal of Psychology, vol. 54, no. 5, 2013, pp. 353-62.
Siqveland TS, Olafsen KS, Moe V. The influence of maternal optimality and infant temperament on parenting stress at 12 months among mothers with substance abuse and psychiatric problems. Scand J Psychol. 2013;54(5):353-62.
Siqveland, T. S., Olafsen, K. S., & Moe, V. (2013). The influence of maternal optimality and infant temperament on parenting stress at 12 months among mothers with substance abuse and psychiatric problems. Scandinavian Journal of Psychology, 54(5), 353-62. https://doi.org/10.1111/sjop.12063
Siqveland TS, Olafsen KS, Moe V. The Influence of Maternal Optimality and Infant Temperament On Parenting Stress at 12 Months Among Mothers With Substance Abuse and Psychiatric Problems. Scand J Psychol. 2013;54(5):353-62. PubMed PMID: 24004246.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - The influence of maternal optimality and infant temperament on parenting stress at 12 months among mothers with substance abuse and psychiatric problems. AU - Siqveland,Torill S, AU - Olafsen,Kåre S, AU - Moe,Vibeke, Y1 - 2013/07/05/ PY - 2011/10/13/received PY - 2013/05/01/accepted PY - 2013/9/6/entrez PY - 2013/9/6/pubmed PY - 2014/5/3/medline KW - Maternal optimality KW - child temperament KW - maternal psychiatric problems KW - maternal substance abuse KW - parenting stress SP - 353 EP - 62 JF - Scandinavian journal of psychology JO - Scand J Psychol VL - 54 IS - 5 N2 - The present prospective longitudinal study aimed to investigate the long-term impact of maternal optimality assessed during pregnancy on parenting stress at infant age 12 months. In this study the concept of optimality was utilized to investigate maternal variations regarding resources during pregnancy in relation to later parenting stress, among three different groups of mothers that were recruited from substance abuse treatment, psychiatric outpatient treatment and well-baby clinics respectively. The influence of infant temperament on parenting stress was also examined. All mothers were interviewed during pregnancy. At 12 months, infant temperament (Colorado Childhood Temperament Inventory; Rowe & Plomin, 1977) and stress in the parent and child domain (Parenting Stress Index; Abidin, 1955) were assessed. Results demonstrated higher levels of parenting stress among mothers in the clinical groups, compared to the non-clinical group. Furthermore, it was the maternal psychiatric optimality index in combination with child temperament characteristics (child emotionality) that contributed uniquely to stress in the parent domain, while stress in the child domain was significantly associated only with child temperament characteristics (both child emotionality and soothability). The association between maternal psychiatric optimality assessed in pregnancy, infant temperament and parenting stress when the infants were 12 months old, points to the importance of simultaneously addressing the mothers' own psychological distress, and to support positive mother-infant interactions. Each woman's individual optimality profile may be used to display needs of follow-up in order to prevent enduring effects of non-optimality on parenting stress. SN - 1467-9450 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/24004246/The_influence_of_maternal_optimality_and_infant_temperament_on_parenting_stress_at_12_months_among_mothers_with_substance_abuse_and_psychiatric_problems_ L2 - https://doi.org/10.1111/sjop.12063 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -