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Economics of malaria prevention in US travelers to West Africa.
Clin Infect Dis. 2014 Jan; 58(1):11-21.CI

Abstract

BACKGROUND

Pretravel health consultations help international travelers manage travel-related illness risks through education, vaccination, and medication. This study evaluated costs and benefits of that portion of the health consultation associated with malaria prevention provided to US travelers bound for West Africa.

METHODS

The estimated change in disease risk and associated costs and benefits resulting from traveler adherence to malaria chemoprophylaxis were calculated from 2 perspectives: the healthcare payer's and the traveler's. We used data from the Global TravEpiNet network of US travel clinics that collect de-identified pretravel data for international travelers. Disease risk and chemoprophylaxis effectiveness were estimated from published medical reports. Direct medical costs were obtained from the Nationwide Inpatient Sample and published literature.

RESULTS

We analyzed 1029 records from January 2009 to January 2011. Assuming full adherence to chemoprophylaxis regimens, consultations saved healthcare payers a per-traveler average of $14 (9-day trip) to $372 (30-day trip). For travelers, consultations resulted in a range of net cost of $20 (9-day trip) to a net savings of $32 (30-day trip). Differences were mostly driven by risk of malaria in the destination country.

CONCLUSIONS

Our model suggests that healthcare payers save money for short- and longer-term trips, and that travelers save money for longer trips when travelers adhere to malaria recommendations and prophylactic regimens in West Africa. This is a potential incentive to healthcare payers to offer consistent pretravel preventive care to travelers. This financial benefit complements the medical benefit of reducing the risk of malaria.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Divisions of Global Migration and Quarantine.No affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Research Support, U.S. Gov't, P.H.S.

Language

eng

PubMed ID

24014735

Citation

Adachi, Kenji, et al. "Economics of Malaria Prevention in US Travelers to West Africa." Clinical Infectious Diseases : an Official Publication of the Infectious Diseases Society of America, vol. 58, no. 1, 2014, pp. 11-21.
Adachi K, Coleman MS, Khan N, et al. Economics of malaria prevention in US travelers to West Africa. Clin Infect Dis. 2014;58(1):11-21.
Adachi, K., Coleman, M. S., Khan, N., Jentes, E. S., Arguin, P., Rao, S. R., LaRocque, R. C., Sotir, M. J., Brunette, G., Ryan, E. T., & Meltzer, M. I. (2014). Economics of malaria prevention in US travelers to West Africa. Clinical Infectious Diseases : an Official Publication of the Infectious Diseases Society of America, 58(1), 11-21. https://doi.org/10.1093/cid/cit570
Adachi K, et al. Economics of Malaria Prevention in US Travelers to West Africa. Clin Infect Dis. 2014;58(1):11-21. PubMed PMID: 24014735.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Economics of malaria prevention in US travelers to West Africa. AU - Adachi,Kenji, AU - Coleman,Margaret S, AU - Khan,Nomana, AU - Jentes,Emily S, AU - Arguin,Paul, AU - Rao,Sowmya R, AU - LaRocque,Regina C, AU - Sotir,Mark J, AU - Brunette,Gary, AU - Ryan,Edward T, AU - Meltzer,Martin I, AU - ,, Y1 - 2013/09/06/ PY - 2013/9/10/entrez PY - 2013/9/10/pubmed PY - 2014/7/30/medline KW - benefits KW - costs KW - malaria prevention KW - pretravel health consultation SP - 11 EP - 21 JF - Clinical infectious diseases : an official publication of the Infectious Diseases Society of America JO - Clin. Infect. Dis. VL - 58 IS - 1 N2 - BACKGROUND: Pretravel health consultations help international travelers manage travel-related illness risks through education, vaccination, and medication. This study evaluated costs and benefits of that portion of the health consultation associated with malaria prevention provided to US travelers bound for West Africa. METHODS: The estimated change in disease risk and associated costs and benefits resulting from traveler adherence to malaria chemoprophylaxis were calculated from 2 perspectives: the healthcare payer's and the traveler's. We used data from the Global TravEpiNet network of US travel clinics that collect de-identified pretravel data for international travelers. Disease risk and chemoprophylaxis effectiveness were estimated from published medical reports. Direct medical costs were obtained from the Nationwide Inpatient Sample and published literature. RESULTS: We analyzed 1029 records from January 2009 to January 2011. Assuming full adherence to chemoprophylaxis regimens, consultations saved healthcare payers a per-traveler average of $14 (9-day trip) to $372 (30-day trip). For travelers, consultations resulted in a range of net cost of $20 (9-day trip) to a net savings of $32 (30-day trip). Differences were mostly driven by risk of malaria in the destination country. CONCLUSIONS: Our model suggests that healthcare payers save money for short- and longer-term trips, and that travelers save money for longer trips when travelers adhere to malaria recommendations and prophylactic regimens in West Africa. This is a potential incentive to healthcare payers to offer consistent pretravel preventive care to travelers. This financial benefit complements the medical benefit of reducing the risk of malaria. SN - 1537-6591 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/24014735/full_citation L2 - https://academic.oup.com/cid/article-lookup/doi/10.1093/cid/cit570 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -