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Effects of peer victimization on psychological and academic adjustment in early adolescence.
Sch Psychol Q. 2014 Mar; 29(1):77-88.SP

Abstract

The purpose of the current study is to investigate the effects of frequency of peer victimization experiences on psychological and academic adjustment during early adolescence, with a focus on testing psychological adjustment as a mediator, as well as differences based on gender and type of victimization. The sample in this short-term longitudinal design study consists of 7th and 8th graders (n = 670, 50% male) from an ethnically and socioeconomically diverse middle school. Victimization was measured using 10 items that assessed frequency of verbal, physical, and relational victimization experiences, and outcomes were assessed with the Behavior Assessment System for Children (2nd ed.) and school records. There was support for gender differences in frequency of peer victimization experiences based on type of victimization. More specifically, boys reported higher levels of physical and verbal victimization, and girls reported higher levels of relational victimization. In addition, there were statistically significant differences between boys and girls on the relation between victimization and anxiety, attendance, and grades, with girls experiencing more maladjustment than boys in response to peer victimization. Finally, results demonstrated no gender differences in indirect effects of psychological adjustment on the relation between peer victimization and academic outcomes, whether victimization was physical, verbal, and relational. These findings highlight the importance of addressing social-emotional functioning as well as peer victimization in the schools for both boys and girls, as both affect students' academic functioning.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Department of Psychology, Wheaton College.Department of Psychology, Eastern Illinois University.

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article

Language

eng

PubMed ID

24015982

Citation

Rueger, Sandra Yu, and Lyndsay N. Jenkins. "Effects of Peer Victimization On Psychological and Academic Adjustment in Early Adolescence." School Psychology Quarterly : the Official Journal of the Division of School Psychology, American Psychological Association, vol. 29, no. 1, 2014, pp. 77-88.
Rueger SY, Jenkins LN. Effects of peer victimization on psychological and academic adjustment in early adolescence. Sch Psychol Q. 2014;29(1):77-88.
Rueger, S. Y., & Jenkins, L. N. (2014). Effects of peer victimization on psychological and academic adjustment in early adolescence. School Psychology Quarterly : the Official Journal of the Division of School Psychology, American Psychological Association, 29(1), 77-88. https://doi.org/10.1037/spq0000036
Rueger SY, Jenkins LN. Effects of Peer Victimization On Psychological and Academic Adjustment in Early Adolescence. Sch Psychol Q. 2014;29(1):77-88. PubMed PMID: 24015982.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Effects of peer victimization on psychological and academic adjustment in early adolescence. AU - Rueger,Sandra Yu, AU - Jenkins,Lyndsay N, Y1 - 2013/09/09/ PY - 2013/9/11/entrez PY - 2013/9/11/pubmed PY - 2015/4/14/medline SP - 77 EP - 88 JF - School psychology quarterly : the official journal of the Division of School Psychology, American Psychological Association JO - Sch Psychol Q VL - 29 IS - 1 N2 - The purpose of the current study is to investigate the effects of frequency of peer victimization experiences on psychological and academic adjustment during early adolescence, with a focus on testing psychological adjustment as a mediator, as well as differences based on gender and type of victimization. The sample in this short-term longitudinal design study consists of 7th and 8th graders (n = 670, 50% male) from an ethnically and socioeconomically diverse middle school. Victimization was measured using 10 items that assessed frequency of verbal, physical, and relational victimization experiences, and outcomes were assessed with the Behavior Assessment System for Children (2nd ed.) and school records. There was support for gender differences in frequency of peer victimization experiences based on type of victimization. More specifically, boys reported higher levels of physical and verbal victimization, and girls reported higher levels of relational victimization. In addition, there were statistically significant differences between boys and girls on the relation between victimization and anxiety, attendance, and grades, with girls experiencing more maladjustment than boys in response to peer victimization. Finally, results demonstrated no gender differences in indirect effects of psychological adjustment on the relation between peer victimization and academic outcomes, whether victimization was physical, verbal, and relational. These findings highlight the importance of addressing social-emotional functioning as well as peer victimization in the schools for both boys and girls, as both affect students' academic functioning. SN - 1939-1560 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/24015982/Effects_of_peer_victimization_on_psychological_and_academic_adjustment_in_early_adolescence_ L2 - http://content.apa.org/journals/spq/29/1/77 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -