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Equol-producing status, isoflavone intake, and breast density in a sample of U.S. Chinese women.
Cancer Epidemiol Biomarkers Prev. 2013 Nov; 22(11):1975-83.CE

Abstract

BACKGROUND

Differences in ability to metabolize daidzein to equol might help explain inconsistent findings about isoflavones and breast cancer. We examined equol-producing status in relation to breast density, a marker of breast cancer risk, and evaluated whether an association of isoflavone intake with breast density differs by equol-producing status in a sample of Chinese immigrant women.

METHODS

Participants were 224 women, ages 36 to 58 years, enrolled in a study on diet and breast density. All women completed dietary recall interviews, underwent a soy challenge to assess equol-producing status, and received a mammogram assessed for breast density using a computer-assisted method.

RESULTS

In our sample, 30% were classified as equol producers. In adjusted linear regression models, equol producers had significantly lower mean dense tissue area (32.8 vs. 37.7 cm(2), P = 0.03) and lower mean percent breast density (32% vs. 35%, P = 0.03) than nonproducers. Significant inverse associations of isoflavone intake with dense area and percent density were apparent, but only in equol producers (interaction P = 0.05 for both).

CONCLUSIONS

These results support the possibility that equol-producing status affects breast density and that effects of isoflavones on breast density depend on ability to metabolize daidzein to equol.

IMPACT

Although these findings warrant confirmation in a larger sample, they offer a possible explanation for the inconsistent findings about soy intake and breast density and possibly breast cancer risk as well. The findings further suggest the importance of identifying factors that influence equol-producing status and exploring appropriate targeting of interventions.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Authors' Affiliations: Kinesiology Department, California Polytechnic State University, San Luis Obispo, California; Department of Preventive Medicine and Biometrics, Uniformed Services University of the Health Sciences, Bethesda, Maryland; Department of Food Science and Nutrition, University of Minnesota, Saint Paul, Minnesota; and Cancer Prevention & Control Program, Fox Chase Cancer Center, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania.No affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Research Support, N.I.H., Extramural

Language

eng

PubMed ID

24019393

Citation

Tseng, Marilyn, et al. "Equol-producing Status, Isoflavone Intake, and Breast Density in a Sample of U.S. Chinese Women." Cancer Epidemiology, Biomarkers & Prevention : a Publication of the American Association for Cancer Research, Cosponsored By the American Society of Preventive Oncology, vol. 22, no. 11, 2013, pp. 1975-83.
Tseng M, Byrne C, Kurzer MS, et al. Equol-producing status, isoflavone intake, and breast density in a sample of U.S. Chinese women. Cancer Epidemiol Biomarkers Prev. 2013;22(11):1975-83.
Tseng, M., Byrne, C., Kurzer, M. S., & Fang, C. Y. (2013). Equol-producing status, isoflavone intake, and breast density in a sample of U.S. Chinese women. Cancer Epidemiology, Biomarkers & Prevention : a Publication of the American Association for Cancer Research, Cosponsored By the American Society of Preventive Oncology, 22(11), 1975-83. https://doi.org/10.1158/1055-9965.EPI-13-0593
Tseng M, et al. Equol-producing Status, Isoflavone Intake, and Breast Density in a Sample of U.S. Chinese Women. Cancer Epidemiol Biomarkers Prev. 2013;22(11):1975-83. PubMed PMID: 24019393.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Equol-producing status, isoflavone intake, and breast density in a sample of U.S. Chinese women. AU - Tseng,Marilyn, AU - Byrne,Celia, AU - Kurzer,Mindy S, AU - Fang,Carolyn Y, Y1 - 2013/09/09/ PY - 2013/9/11/entrez PY - 2013/9/11/pubmed PY - 2014/8/26/medline SP - 1975 EP - 83 JF - Cancer epidemiology, biomarkers & prevention : a publication of the American Association for Cancer Research, cosponsored by the American Society of Preventive Oncology JO - Cancer Epidemiol Biomarkers Prev VL - 22 IS - 11 N2 - BACKGROUND: Differences in ability to metabolize daidzein to equol might help explain inconsistent findings about isoflavones and breast cancer. We examined equol-producing status in relation to breast density, a marker of breast cancer risk, and evaluated whether an association of isoflavone intake with breast density differs by equol-producing status in a sample of Chinese immigrant women. METHODS: Participants were 224 women, ages 36 to 58 years, enrolled in a study on diet and breast density. All women completed dietary recall interviews, underwent a soy challenge to assess equol-producing status, and received a mammogram assessed for breast density using a computer-assisted method. RESULTS: In our sample, 30% were classified as equol producers. In adjusted linear regression models, equol producers had significantly lower mean dense tissue area (32.8 vs. 37.7 cm(2), P = 0.03) and lower mean percent breast density (32% vs. 35%, P = 0.03) than nonproducers. Significant inverse associations of isoflavone intake with dense area and percent density were apparent, but only in equol producers (interaction P = 0.05 for both). CONCLUSIONS: These results support the possibility that equol-producing status affects breast density and that effects of isoflavones on breast density depend on ability to metabolize daidzein to equol. IMPACT: Although these findings warrant confirmation in a larger sample, they offer a possible explanation for the inconsistent findings about soy intake and breast density and possibly breast cancer risk as well. The findings further suggest the importance of identifying factors that influence equol-producing status and exploring appropriate targeting of interventions. SN - 1538-7755 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/24019393/Equol_producing_status_isoflavone_intake_and_breast_density_in_a_sample_of_U_S__Chinese_women_ L2 - http://cebp.aacrjournals.org/cgi/pmidlookup?view=long&pmid=24019393 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -