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The lived experience of mothers of multiple children with intellectual disabilities.
Qual Health Res 2013; 23(10):1307-19QH

Abstract

In this study, we explored the lived experience of Japanese mothers who have delivered multiple children with intellectual disabilities (ID), using interpretative phenomenological analysis. We identified three superordinate themes and seven subordinate themes from the narrative data collected from 10 participants. The superordinate themes were: abandoned hope for having an ordinary family, accumulating physical and mental fatigue, and searching for positive experiences in parenting multiple children with disabilities. How they perceived the birth of children with disabilities for the second time differed depending on the disability types; specifically, whether they detected the disabilities early or not. Encountering the disability in another child overwhelmed mothers, especially when the disabilities were diagnosed after several years with or without suspicion; they struggled to accept the fact. Despite mothers facing extreme difficulties in parenting multiple children with disabilities, they tried to alter the negative perceptions and find an optimistic way of living.

Authors+Show Affiliations

1The University of Tokyo, Bunkyo-ku, Tokyo, Japan.No affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't

Language

eng

PubMed ID

24022734

Citation

Kimura, Miyako, and Yoshihiko Yamazaki. "The Lived Experience of Mothers of Multiple Children With Intellectual Disabilities." Qualitative Health Research, vol. 23, no. 10, 2013, pp. 1307-19.
Kimura M, Yamazaki Y. The lived experience of mothers of multiple children with intellectual disabilities. Qual Health Res. 2013;23(10):1307-19.
Kimura, M., & Yamazaki, Y. (2013). The lived experience of mothers of multiple children with intellectual disabilities. Qualitative Health Research, 23(10), pp. 1307-19. doi:10.1177/1049732313504828.
Kimura M, Yamazaki Y. The Lived Experience of Mothers of Multiple Children With Intellectual Disabilities. Qual Health Res. 2013;23(10):1307-19. PubMed PMID: 24022734.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - The lived experience of mothers of multiple children with intellectual disabilities. AU - Kimura,Miyako, AU - Yamazaki,Yoshihiko, Y1 - 2013/09/10/ PY - 2013/9/12/entrez PY - 2013/9/12/pubmed PY - 2014/8/15/medline KW - children, disability KW - interpretative phenomenological analysis (IPA) KW - lived experience KW - mothers, mothering KW - research, qualitative SP - 1307 EP - 19 JF - Qualitative health research JO - Qual Health Res VL - 23 IS - 10 N2 - In this study, we explored the lived experience of Japanese mothers who have delivered multiple children with intellectual disabilities (ID), using interpretative phenomenological analysis. We identified three superordinate themes and seven subordinate themes from the narrative data collected from 10 participants. The superordinate themes were: abandoned hope for having an ordinary family, accumulating physical and mental fatigue, and searching for positive experiences in parenting multiple children with disabilities. How they perceived the birth of children with disabilities for the second time differed depending on the disability types; specifically, whether they detected the disabilities early or not. Encountering the disability in another child overwhelmed mothers, especially when the disabilities were diagnosed after several years with or without suspicion; they struggled to accept the fact. Despite mothers facing extreme difficulties in parenting multiple children with disabilities, they tried to alter the negative perceptions and find an optimistic way of living. SN - 1049-7323 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/24022734/The_lived_experience_of_mothers_of_multiple_children_with_intellectual_disabilities_ L2 - http://journals.sagepub.com/doi/full/10.1177/1049732313504828?url_ver=Z39.88-2003&rfr_id=ori:rid:crossref.org&rfr_dat=cr_pub=pubmed DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -