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Intakes of PUFAs were inversely associated with plasma C-reactive protein 12 years later in a middle-aged population with vitamin E intake as an effect modifier.
J Nutr 2013; 143(11):1760-6JN

Abstract

Although n-3 (ω-3) polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFAs) are considered anti-inflammatory components, the role of dietary n-6 PUFAs in inflammation remains controversial. Some mechanistic evidence suggests vitamin E as a potential effect modifier in the relationship between PUFAs and inflammation. Our objectives were to evaluate the long-term associations between dietary intakes of PUFAs and elevated plasma C-reactive protein (CRP) and to investigate potential effect modification by vitamin E. Individuals in the placebo group of the SU.VI.MAX trial who had available CRP measurements in 2007-2009 were included in the study (n = 843). Dietary intakes of n-3 PUFAs, n-6 PUFAs, and vitamin E were assessed in 1994-1996 with at least 6 dietary records. The logistic regression OR for elevated CRP (>3 mg/L) and 95% CI were estimated for individual PUFAs and for total n-3 and n-6 PUFA intakes. Models were adjusted for sociodemographical, lifestyle, anthropometric, and dietary variables. Interactions with vitamin E intakes were also assessed. Inverse associations were observed between intakes of total n-3 PUFAs [α-linolenic acid (ALA; 18:3n-3), ALA + eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA; 20:5n-3), EPA + docosapentaenoic acid (DPA; 22:5n-3), DPA + docosahexaenoic acid (DHA; 22:6n-3)] and n-6 PUFA [linoleic acid (18:2n-6) + arachidonic acid (20:4n-6)] and elevated CRP (OR for tertile 3 vs. tertile 1 of intake: 0.41; 95% CI: 0.21, 0.77; P-trend = 0.01; and OR 0.38; 95% CI: 0.21, 0.70; P-trend = 0.002, respectively). Stratification on vitamin E intakes showed that inverse associations between dietary n-3 and n-6 PUFA intakes and elevated CRP were substantial only in individuals with low intakes of vitamin E. Our results supported the contention that intakes of both n-3 and n-6 PUFAs are inversely associated with plasma CRP concentrations. Vitamin E is a potential effect modifier and should therefore be taken into account in such investigations. This trial was registered at clinicaltrials.gov as NCT00272428.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Inserm (National Institute of Health and Medical Research), U557 Nutritional Epidemiology Unit, Bobigny, France.No affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Randomized Controlled Trial
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't

Language

eng

PubMed ID

24027184

Citation

Julia, Chantal, et al. "Intakes of PUFAs Were Inversely Associated With Plasma C-reactive Protein 12 Years Later in a Middle-aged Population With Vitamin E Intake as an Effect Modifier." The Journal of Nutrition, vol. 143, no. 11, 2013, pp. 1760-6.
Julia C, Touvier M, Meunier N, et al. Intakes of PUFAs were inversely associated with plasma C-reactive protein 12 years later in a middle-aged population with vitamin E intake as an effect modifier. J Nutr. 2013;143(11):1760-6.
Julia, C., Touvier, M., Meunier, N., Papet, I., Galan, P., Hercberg, S., & Kesse-Guyot, E. (2013). Intakes of PUFAs were inversely associated with plasma C-reactive protein 12 years later in a middle-aged population with vitamin E intake as an effect modifier. The Journal of Nutrition, 143(11), pp. 1760-6. doi:10.3945/jn.113.180943.
Julia C, et al. Intakes of PUFAs Were Inversely Associated With Plasma C-reactive Protein 12 Years Later in a Middle-aged Population With Vitamin E Intake as an Effect Modifier. J Nutr. 2013;143(11):1760-6. PubMed PMID: 24027184.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Intakes of PUFAs were inversely associated with plasma C-reactive protein 12 years later in a middle-aged population with vitamin E intake as an effect modifier. AU - Julia,Chantal, AU - Touvier,Mathilde, AU - Meunier,Nathalie, AU - Papet,Isabelle, AU - Galan,Pilar, AU - Hercberg,Serge, AU - Kesse-Guyot,Emmanuelle, Y1 - 2013/09/11/ PY - 2013/9/13/entrez PY - 2013/9/13/pubmed PY - 2013/12/18/medline SP - 1760 EP - 6 JF - The Journal of nutrition JO - J. Nutr. VL - 143 IS - 11 N2 - Although n-3 (ω-3) polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFAs) are considered anti-inflammatory components, the role of dietary n-6 PUFAs in inflammation remains controversial. Some mechanistic evidence suggests vitamin E as a potential effect modifier in the relationship between PUFAs and inflammation. Our objectives were to evaluate the long-term associations between dietary intakes of PUFAs and elevated plasma C-reactive protein (CRP) and to investigate potential effect modification by vitamin E. Individuals in the placebo group of the SU.VI.MAX trial who had available CRP measurements in 2007-2009 were included in the study (n = 843). Dietary intakes of n-3 PUFAs, n-6 PUFAs, and vitamin E were assessed in 1994-1996 with at least 6 dietary records. The logistic regression OR for elevated CRP (>3 mg/L) and 95% CI were estimated for individual PUFAs and for total n-3 and n-6 PUFA intakes. Models were adjusted for sociodemographical, lifestyle, anthropometric, and dietary variables. Interactions with vitamin E intakes were also assessed. Inverse associations were observed between intakes of total n-3 PUFAs [α-linolenic acid (ALA; 18:3n-3), ALA + eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA; 20:5n-3), EPA + docosapentaenoic acid (DPA; 22:5n-3), DPA + docosahexaenoic acid (DHA; 22:6n-3)] and n-6 PUFA [linoleic acid (18:2n-6) + arachidonic acid (20:4n-6)] and elevated CRP (OR for tertile 3 vs. tertile 1 of intake: 0.41; 95% CI: 0.21, 0.77; P-trend = 0.01; and OR 0.38; 95% CI: 0.21, 0.70; P-trend = 0.002, respectively). Stratification on vitamin E intakes showed that inverse associations between dietary n-3 and n-6 PUFA intakes and elevated CRP were substantial only in individuals with low intakes of vitamin E. Our results supported the contention that intakes of both n-3 and n-6 PUFAs are inversely associated with plasma CRP concentrations. Vitamin E is a potential effect modifier and should therefore be taken into account in such investigations. This trial was registered at clinicaltrials.gov as NCT00272428. SN - 1541-6100 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/24027184/Intakes_of_PUFAs_were_inversely_associated_with_plasma_C_reactive_protein_12_years_later_in_a_middle_aged_population_with_vitamin_E_intake_as_an_effect_modifier_ L2 - https://academic.oup.com/jn/article-lookup/doi/10.3945/jn.113.180943 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -