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Can obese stone formers follow dietary recommendations?
J Endourol. 2014 Feb; 28(2):248-51.JE

Abstract

INTRODUCTION

Obese patients have an increased risk of kidney stones, and several studies have identified specific urinary derangements on 24-hour collections. The objective of this study was to assess obese and super-obese stone formers, and their compliance with dietary modifications over time, based on 24-hour urine outcomes.

PATIENTS AND METHODS

A retrospective review was performed searching for all stone formers who completed a 24-hour urine collection before and after dietary counseling for stone prevention. Patients were excluded if placed on medical therapy in addition to dietary therapy. Patients were divided in three main groups according to their body mass index (BMI): 30, 30-40, and >40 kg/m(2). Demographic data and 24-hour urine stone risk parameters (volume, sodium, uric acid, citrate, and oxalate) were assessed. Initial 24-hour urine results were compared to follow-up results after dietary counseling. Then, the outcomes from each group were compared to each other.

RESULTS

Two hundred and fourteen stone formers (67% male) were identified with a mean age of 49.5±15.0 years. One hundred twenty-eight (59.8%) patients had BMI <30 kg/m(2), 61 (28.5%) between 30-40 kg/m(2), and 25 (11.7%) >40 kg/m(2). Among patients with BMI <30 kg/m(2), there were significant improvements in all urinary parameters (p<0.001) as well as in the group with BMI between 30 to 40 kg/m(2) (p=0.02 for oxalate, p<0.001 for other parameters). Among super-obese patients, there were significant improvements in the urinary volume (p=0.03), sodium (p<0.001), uric acid (p=0.001), and oxalate (p<0.001). There were no significant differences in the improvements observed in the urinary volume (p=0.69), sodium (p=0.08), uric acid (p=0.17), and citrate levels (p=0.97) between the groups.

CONCLUSION

Dietary recommendations can be an equally effective strategy in decreasing the risk or stone recurrence in obese and super-obese kidney stone formers as it is in those who are not obese.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Stevan B. Streem Center for Endourology & Stone Disease, Glickman Urological & Kidney Institute , The Cleveland Clinic, Cleveland, Ohio.No affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article

Language

eng

PubMed ID

24032438

Citation

Torricelli, Fabio Cesar Miranda, et al. "Can Obese Stone Formers Follow Dietary Recommendations?" Journal of Endourology, vol. 28, no. 2, 2014, pp. 248-51.
Torricelli FC, De S, Li I, et al. Can obese stone formers follow dietary recommendations? J Endourol. 2014;28(2):248-51.
Torricelli, F. C., De, S., Li, I., Sarkissian, C., & Monga, M. (2014). Can obese stone formers follow dietary recommendations? Journal of Endourology, 28(2), 248-51. https://doi.org/10.1089/end.2013.0536
Torricelli FC, et al. Can Obese Stone Formers Follow Dietary Recommendations. J Endourol. 2014;28(2):248-51. PubMed PMID: 24032438.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Can obese stone formers follow dietary recommendations? AU - Torricelli,Fabio Cesar Miranda, AU - De,Shubha, AU - Li,Ina, AU - Sarkissian,Carl, AU - Monga,Manoj, Y1 - 2013/11/04/ PY - 2013/9/17/entrez PY - 2013/9/17/pubmed PY - 2014/5/10/medline SP - 248 EP - 51 JF - Journal of endourology JO - J. Endourol. VL - 28 IS - 2 N2 - INTRODUCTION: Obese patients have an increased risk of kidney stones, and several studies have identified specific urinary derangements on 24-hour collections. The objective of this study was to assess obese and super-obese stone formers, and their compliance with dietary modifications over time, based on 24-hour urine outcomes. PATIENTS AND METHODS: A retrospective review was performed searching for all stone formers who completed a 24-hour urine collection before and after dietary counseling for stone prevention. Patients were excluded if placed on medical therapy in addition to dietary therapy. Patients were divided in three main groups according to their body mass index (BMI): 30, 30-40, and >40 kg/m(2). Demographic data and 24-hour urine stone risk parameters (volume, sodium, uric acid, citrate, and oxalate) were assessed. Initial 24-hour urine results were compared to follow-up results after dietary counseling. Then, the outcomes from each group were compared to each other. RESULTS: Two hundred and fourteen stone formers (67% male) were identified with a mean age of 49.5±15.0 years. One hundred twenty-eight (59.8%) patients had BMI <30 kg/m(2), 61 (28.5%) between 30-40 kg/m(2), and 25 (11.7%) >40 kg/m(2). Among patients with BMI <30 kg/m(2), there were significant improvements in all urinary parameters (p<0.001) as well as in the group with BMI between 30 to 40 kg/m(2) (p=0.02 for oxalate, p<0.001 for other parameters). Among super-obese patients, there were significant improvements in the urinary volume (p=0.03), sodium (p<0.001), uric acid (p=0.001), and oxalate (p<0.001). There were no significant differences in the improvements observed in the urinary volume (p=0.69), sodium (p=0.08), uric acid (p=0.17), and citrate levels (p=0.97) between the groups. CONCLUSION: Dietary recommendations can be an equally effective strategy in decreasing the risk or stone recurrence in obese and super-obese kidney stone formers as it is in those who are not obese. SN - 1557-900X UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/24032438/Can_obese_stone_formers_follow_dietary_recommendations L2 - https://www.liebertpub.com/doi/full/10.1089/end.2013.0536?url_ver=Z39.88-2003&amp;rfr_id=ori:rid:crossref.org&amp;rfr_dat=cr_pub=pubmed DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -