Tags

Type your tag names separated by a space and hit enter

The high-fat high-fructose hamster as an animal model for niacin's biological activities in humans.
Metabolism. 2013 Dec; 62(12):1840-9.M

Abstract

OBJECTIVE

Niacin has been used for more than 50 years to treat dyslipidemia, yet the mechanisms underlying its lipid-modifying effects remain unknown, a situation stemming at least in part from a lack of validated animal models. The objective of this study was to determine if the dyslipidemic hamster could serve as such a model.

MATERIALS/METHODS

Dyslipidemia was induced in Golden Syrian hamsters by feeding them a high-fat, high-cholesterol, and high-fructose (HF/HF) diet. The effect of high-dose niacin treatment for 18 days and 28 days on plasma lipid levels and gene expression was measured.

RESULTS

Niacin treatment produced significant decreases in plasma total cholesterol (TC), low-density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL-C), triglycerides (TG), and free fatty acids (FFA), but had no measureable effect on high-density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDL-C) in the dyslipidemic hamster. Niacin treatment also produced significant increases in hepatic adenosine ATP-Binding Cassette A1 (ABCA1) mRNA, ABCA1 protein, apolipoprotein A-I (Apo A-I) mRNA, and adipose adiponectin mRNA in these animals.

CONCLUSIONS

With the exception of HDL-C, the lipid effects of niacin treatment in the dyslipidemic hamster closely parallel those observed in humans. Moreover, the effects of niacin treatment on gene expression of hepatic proteins related to HDL metabolism are similar to those observed in human cells in culture. The HF/HF-fed hamster could therefore serve as an animal model for niacin's lowering of proatherogenic lipids and mechanisms of action relative to lipid metabolism.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Tufts University Sackler School of Graduate Biomedical Sciences, Department of Biochemistry, Boston, MA, USA; Arisaph Pharmaceuticals, Boston, MA, USA.No affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Research Support, U.S. Gov't, Non-P.H.S.

Language

eng

PubMed ID

24035454

Citation

Connolly, Beth A., et al. "The High-fat High-fructose Hamster as an Animal Model for Niacin's Biological Activities in Humans." Metabolism: Clinical and Experimental, vol. 62, no. 12, 2013, pp. 1840-9.
Connolly BA, O'Connell DP, Lamon-Fava S, et al. The high-fat high-fructose hamster as an animal model for niacin's biological activities in humans. Metabolism. 2013;62(12):1840-9.
Connolly, B. A., O'Connell, D. P., Lamon-Fava, S., LeBlanc, D. F., Kuang, Y. L., Schaefer, E. J., Coppage, A. L., Benedict, C. R., Kiritsy, C. P., & Bachovchin, W. W. (2013). The high-fat high-fructose hamster as an animal model for niacin's biological activities in humans. Metabolism: Clinical and Experimental, 62(12), 1840-9. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.metabol.2013.08.001
Connolly BA, et al. The High-fat High-fructose Hamster as an Animal Model for Niacin's Biological Activities in Humans. Metabolism. 2013;62(12):1840-9. PubMed PMID: 24035454.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - The high-fat high-fructose hamster as an animal model for niacin's biological activities in humans. AU - Connolly,Beth A, AU - O'Connell,Daniel P, AU - Lamon-Fava,Stefania, AU - LeBlanc,Daniel F, AU - Kuang,Yu-Lin, AU - Schaefer,Ernst J, AU - Coppage,Andrew L, AU - Benedict,Claude R, AU - Kiritsy,Christopher P, AU - Bachovchin,William W, Y1 - 2013/09/13/ PY - 2013/01/17/received PY - 2013/07/18/revised PY - 2013/08/03/accepted PY - 2013/9/17/entrez PY - 2013/9/17/pubmed PY - 2014/1/9/medline KW - ABCA1 KW - AIM-HIGH KW - ARBITER KW - Apo A-I KW - ApoB48 KW - Arterial Biology for the Investigation of Treatment Effects of Reducing Cholesterol KW - Atherothrombosis Intervention in Metabolic Syndrome with Low HDL/High Triglycerides: Impact on Global Health Outcomes KW - CETP KW - CLAS KW - DGAT2 KW - FATS KW - FFA KW - Familial Atherosclerosis Treatment Study KW - GS KW - Golden Syrian KW - HATS KW - HDL KW - HDL-Atherosclerosis Treatment Study KW - HDL-C KW - HF/HF KW - HPS2-THRIVE KW - Heart Protection Study 2-Treatment of HDL to Reduce the Incidence of Vascular Events KW - LDL KW - LDL-C KW - LDLr KW - LXRα KW - Lipid metabolism KW - NC KW - SR-B1 KW - TC KW - TG KW - The Cholesterol-Lowering Atherosclerosis Study KW - VLDL KW - adenosine ATP-Binding Cassette A1 KW - apoE KW - apolipoprotein A-I KW - apolipoprotein B48 KW - apolipoprotein E KW - cholesteryl ester transfer protein KW - diacylglycerol acyltransferase 2 KW - free fatty acids KW - high-density lipoprotein KW - high-fat, high-cholesterol, and high-fructose KW - liver x receptor-alpha KW - low-density lipoprotein KW - low-density lipoprotein receptor KW - normal chow KW - scavenger receptor class B member 1. KW - total cholesterol KW - triglycerides KW - very low-density lipoprotein SP - 1840 EP - 9 JF - Metabolism: clinical and experimental JO - Metabolism VL - 62 IS - 12 N2 - OBJECTIVE: Niacin has been used for more than 50 years to treat dyslipidemia, yet the mechanisms underlying its lipid-modifying effects remain unknown, a situation stemming at least in part from a lack of validated animal models. The objective of this study was to determine if the dyslipidemic hamster could serve as such a model. MATERIALS/METHODS: Dyslipidemia was induced in Golden Syrian hamsters by feeding them a high-fat, high-cholesterol, and high-fructose (HF/HF) diet. The effect of high-dose niacin treatment for 18 days and 28 days on plasma lipid levels and gene expression was measured. RESULTS: Niacin treatment produced significant decreases in plasma total cholesterol (TC), low-density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL-C), triglycerides (TG), and free fatty acids (FFA), but had no measureable effect on high-density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDL-C) in the dyslipidemic hamster. Niacin treatment also produced significant increases in hepatic adenosine ATP-Binding Cassette A1 (ABCA1) mRNA, ABCA1 protein, apolipoprotein A-I (Apo A-I) mRNA, and adipose adiponectin mRNA in these animals. CONCLUSIONS: With the exception of HDL-C, the lipid effects of niacin treatment in the dyslipidemic hamster closely parallel those observed in humans. Moreover, the effects of niacin treatment on gene expression of hepatic proteins related to HDL metabolism are similar to those observed in human cells in culture. The HF/HF-fed hamster could therefore serve as an animal model for niacin's lowering of proatherogenic lipids and mechanisms of action relative to lipid metabolism. SN - 1532-8600 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/24035454/The_high_fat_high_fructose_hamster_as_an_animal_model_for_niacin's_biological_activities_in_humans_ L2 - https://linkinghub.elsevier.com/retrieve/pii/S0026-0495(13)00243-6 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -