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Changes in psychosocial work environment and depressive symptoms: a prospective study in junior physicians.
Am J Ind Med. 2013 Dec; 56(12):1414-22.AJ

Abstract

BACKGROUND

We examined the impact of changes in the psychosocial work environment on depressive symptoms in a sample of junior physicians, a high risk group for stress and mental disorders.

METHODS

This is a three-wave prospective study in 417 junior physicians during their residency in German hospitals. The psychosocial work environment was measured by the Effort-Reward Imbalance (ERI) Questionnaire at Waves 1 and 2, and the depressive symptoms were assessed with the State-Trait Depression Scales at all three waves. Multivariate linear regression was applied for prospective associations between ERI across Waves 1 and 2, and baseline-adjusted depressive symptoms at Wave 3.

RESULTS

Compared with the ERI scores at Wave 1, at Wave 2, and mean scores between the two waves, the baseline-adjusted ERI change scores between the two waves showed slightly better statistical power, predicting depressive symptoms at Wave 3 (β = 0.78, 95% CI = 0.38-1.18 for increased ERI per SD, β = 0.64, 95% CI = 0.22-1.06 for increased effort per SD, β = -0.65, 95% CI = -1.06 to -0.24 for increased reward per SD, and β = 0.68, 95% CI = 0.27-1.09 for increased overcommitment per SD).

CONCLUSIONS

Negative changes in the psychosocial work environment, specifically increased ERI, are associated with depressive symptoms in German junior physicians. Reducing the non-reciprocity of working life, particularly improving reward at work, may have beneficial effects on prevention of mental health problems in the hospital workplace.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Institute of Occupational and Social Medicine, Center for Health and Society, Faculty of Medicine, University of Düsseldorf, Düsseldorf, Germany; Institute of Medical Sociology, Center for Health and Society, Faculty of Medicine, University of Düsseldorf, Düsseldorf, Germany.No affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't

Language

eng

PubMed ID

24038041

Citation

Li, Jian, et al. "Changes in Psychosocial Work Environment and Depressive Symptoms: a Prospective Study in Junior Physicians." American Journal of Industrial Medicine, vol. 56, no. 12, 2013, pp. 1414-22.
Li J, Weigl M, Glaser J, et al. Changes in psychosocial work environment and depressive symptoms: a prospective study in junior physicians. Am J Ind Med. 2013;56(12):1414-22.
Li, J., Weigl, M., Glaser, J., Petru, R., Siegrist, J., & Angerer, P. (2013). Changes in psychosocial work environment and depressive symptoms: a prospective study in junior physicians. American Journal of Industrial Medicine, 56(12), 1414-22. https://doi.org/10.1002/ajim.22246
Li J, et al. Changes in Psychosocial Work Environment and Depressive Symptoms: a Prospective Study in Junior Physicians. Am J Ind Med. 2013;56(12):1414-22. PubMed PMID: 24038041.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Changes in psychosocial work environment and depressive symptoms: a prospective study in junior physicians. AU - Li,Jian, AU - Weigl,Matthias, AU - Glaser,Jürgen, AU - Petru,Raluca, AU - Siegrist,Johannes, AU - Angerer,Peter, Y1 - 2013/09/03/ PY - 2013/07/29/accepted PY - 2013/9/17/entrez PY - 2013/9/17/pubmed PY - 2014/10/25/medline KW - changes KW - depression KW - effort-reward imbalance KW - junior physicians KW - prospective study SP - 1414 EP - 22 JF - American journal of industrial medicine JO - Am. J. Ind. Med. VL - 56 IS - 12 N2 - BACKGROUND: We examined the impact of changes in the psychosocial work environment on depressive symptoms in a sample of junior physicians, a high risk group for stress and mental disorders. METHODS: This is a three-wave prospective study in 417 junior physicians during their residency in German hospitals. The psychosocial work environment was measured by the Effort-Reward Imbalance (ERI) Questionnaire at Waves 1 and 2, and the depressive symptoms were assessed with the State-Trait Depression Scales at all three waves. Multivariate linear regression was applied for prospective associations between ERI across Waves 1 and 2, and baseline-adjusted depressive symptoms at Wave 3. RESULTS: Compared with the ERI scores at Wave 1, at Wave 2, and mean scores between the two waves, the baseline-adjusted ERI change scores between the two waves showed slightly better statistical power, predicting depressive symptoms at Wave 3 (β = 0.78, 95% CI = 0.38-1.18 for increased ERI per SD, β = 0.64, 95% CI = 0.22-1.06 for increased effort per SD, β = -0.65, 95% CI = -1.06 to -0.24 for increased reward per SD, and β = 0.68, 95% CI = 0.27-1.09 for increased overcommitment per SD). CONCLUSIONS: Negative changes in the psychosocial work environment, specifically increased ERI, are associated with depressive symptoms in German junior physicians. Reducing the non-reciprocity of working life, particularly improving reward at work, may have beneficial effects on prevention of mental health problems in the hospital workplace. SN - 1097-0274 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/24038041/Changes_in_psychosocial_work_environment_and_depressive_symptoms:_a_prospective_study_in_junior_physicians_ L2 - https://doi.org/10.1002/ajim.22246 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -