Tags

Type your tag names separated by a space and hit enter

Is folic acid supplementation really necessary in preterm infants ≤ 32 weeks of gestation?
J Pediatr Gastroenterol Nutr. 2014 Feb; 58(2):188-92.JP

Abstract

OBJECTIVES

The aim of this study was to define whether there was folate deficiency in hospitalized preterm infants, and, second, to define the effect of feeding modalities on serum folate levels.

METHODS

Infants born ≤ 32 weeks of gestation were included in the study. Blood samples for the determination of serum folate levels were obtained on days 14 and 28 postnatally, as well as 36 weeks postconceptionally (or just before discharge if patients are discharged <36 weeks)--samples A, B, and C, respectively. Infants were divided into 3 groups based on mode of feeding; human breast milk (HBM), fortified HBM (fHBM), or preterm formula (PF).

RESULTS

A total of 162 preterm infants were enrolled: 17 (10.5%) of whom received HBM alone, 94 (58%) received fHBM, and 51 (31.5%) were fed with PF. None of the preterm infants developed folate deficiency during the study period. Preterm infants in the fHBM and PF groups had significant higher serum folate levels in samples C when compared with those receiving HBM alone (P < 0.001 for both). Multivariate analysis to evaluate the effects of maternal supplementation, smoking habit, gestational age, birth weight, and cumulative folic acid intake in samples A, B, and C suggested that maternal smoking and maternal folic acid supplementation had significant effects on serum folate levels in sample A and B.

CONCLUSIONS

Preterm infants receiving parenteral nutrition with high folic acid content have no risk of folate deficiency during the 2 months of age; however, preterm infants fed orally from birth with HBM or PF with a low folic acid content could be at risk for folate deficiency, especially when mothers are smokers and/or do not receive folic acid supplementation during pregnancy.

Authors+Show Affiliations

*Division of Neonatology, Zekai Tahir Burak Maternity Teaching Hospital, Ankara †Department of Pediatrics, Division of Neonatology, Inönü University School of Medicine, Malatya ‡Department of Pediatrics, Division of Neonatology, Ankara University School of Medicine §Department of Biostatistics, Hacettepe University, Faculty of Medicine.No affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article

Language

eng

PubMed ID

24051483

Citation

Oncel, Mehmet Yekta, et al. "Is Folic Acid Supplementation Really Necessary in Preterm Infants ≤ 32 Weeks of Gestation?" Journal of Pediatric Gastroenterology and Nutrition, vol. 58, no. 2, 2014, pp. 188-92.
Oncel MY, Calisici E, Ozdemir R, et al. Is folic acid supplementation really necessary in preterm infants ≤ 32 weeks of gestation? J Pediatr Gastroenterol Nutr. 2014;58(2):188-92.
Oncel, M. Y., Calisici, E., Ozdemir, R., Yurttutan, S., Erdeve, O., Karahan, S., & Dilmen, U. (2014). Is folic acid supplementation really necessary in preterm infants ≤ 32 weeks of gestation? Journal of Pediatric Gastroenterology and Nutrition, 58(2), 188-92. https://doi.org/10.1097/MPG.0000000000000181
Oncel MY, et al. Is Folic Acid Supplementation Really Necessary in Preterm Infants ≤ 32 Weeks of Gestation. J Pediatr Gastroenterol Nutr. 2014;58(2):188-92. PubMed PMID: 24051483.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Is folic acid supplementation really necessary in preterm infants ≤ 32 weeks of gestation? AU - Oncel,Mehmet Yekta, AU - Calisici,Erhan, AU - Ozdemir,Ramazan, AU - Yurttutan,Sadik, AU - Erdeve,Omer, AU - Karahan,Sevilay, AU - Dilmen,Ugur, PY - 2013/9/21/entrez PY - 2013/9/21/pubmed PY - 2015/4/17/medline SP - 188 EP - 92 JF - Journal of pediatric gastroenterology and nutrition JO - J. Pediatr. Gastroenterol. Nutr. VL - 58 IS - 2 N2 - OBJECTIVES: The aim of this study was to define whether there was folate deficiency in hospitalized preterm infants, and, second, to define the effect of feeding modalities on serum folate levels. METHODS: Infants born ≤ 32 weeks of gestation were included in the study. Blood samples for the determination of serum folate levels were obtained on days 14 and 28 postnatally, as well as 36 weeks postconceptionally (or just before discharge if patients are discharged <36 weeks)--samples A, B, and C, respectively. Infants were divided into 3 groups based on mode of feeding; human breast milk (HBM), fortified HBM (fHBM), or preterm formula (PF). RESULTS: A total of 162 preterm infants were enrolled: 17 (10.5%) of whom received HBM alone, 94 (58%) received fHBM, and 51 (31.5%) were fed with PF. None of the preterm infants developed folate deficiency during the study period. Preterm infants in the fHBM and PF groups had significant higher serum folate levels in samples C when compared with those receiving HBM alone (P < 0.001 for both). Multivariate analysis to evaluate the effects of maternal supplementation, smoking habit, gestational age, birth weight, and cumulative folic acid intake in samples A, B, and C suggested that maternal smoking and maternal folic acid supplementation had significant effects on serum folate levels in sample A and B. CONCLUSIONS: Preterm infants receiving parenteral nutrition with high folic acid content have no risk of folate deficiency during the 2 months of age; however, preterm infants fed orally from birth with HBM or PF with a low folic acid content could be at risk for folate deficiency, especially when mothers are smokers and/or do not receive folic acid supplementation during pregnancy. SN - 1536-4801 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/24051483/Is_folic_acid_supplementation_really_necessary_in_preterm_infants_≤_32_weeks_of_gestation L2 - http://dx.doi.org/10.1097/MPG.0000000000000181 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -