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Trends in the incidence and transmission patterns of trichinosis in humans in the United States: comparisons of the periods 1975-1981 and 1982-1986.
Rev Infect Dis. 1990 Jan-Feb; 12(1):5-11.RI

Abstract

Since 1947, the U.S. Public Health Service has recorded statistics on reported cases of trichinosis in humans. More complete clinical and epidemiologic data on cases became available after 1965, when trichinosis was officially made a notifiable disease. The numbers of reported cases declined markedly from an average of approximately 400, with 10-15 deaths reported each year in the late 1940s, to 57 per year, with three deaths in the 5 years 1982-1986. Although annual incidence was highest in sparsely populated Alaska, the highest numbers of cases are reported from the northeastern United States. Food sources of this infection vary in different geographic regions. The decline in annual incidence during the past 12 years appears to be accounted for largely by a decline in the number of cases attributed to commercially purchased pork, although pork products continue to be the major source of infections in humans. The number of cases due to ingestion of wild animal meat have remained relatively constant. Activities at the national and state level that have improved the prospects for control and prevention of trichinosis in commercial products are discussed.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Division of Parasitic Diseases, Centers for Disease Control, Atlanta, Georgia 30333.No affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Comparative Study
Journal Article
Review

Language

eng

PubMed ID

2405469

Citation

Bailey, T M., and P M. Schantz. "Trends in the Incidence and Transmission Patterns of Trichinosis in Humans in the United States: Comparisons of the Periods 1975-1981 and 1982-1986." Reviews of Infectious Diseases, vol. 12, no. 1, 1990, pp. 5-11.
Bailey TM, Schantz PM. Trends in the incidence and transmission patterns of trichinosis in humans in the United States: comparisons of the periods 1975-1981 and 1982-1986. Rev Infect Dis. 1990;12(1):5-11.
Bailey, T. M., & Schantz, P. M. (1990). Trends in the incidence and transmission patterns of trichinosis in humans in the United States: comparisons of the periods 1975-1981 and 1982-1986. Reviews of Infectious Diseases, 12(1), 5-11.
Bailey TM, Schantz PM. Trends in the Incidence and Transmission Patterns of Trichinosis in Humans in the United States: Comparisons of the Periods 1975-1981 and 1982-1986. Rev Infect Dis. 1990 Jan-Feb;12(1):5-11. PubMed PMID: 2405469.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Trends in the incidence and transmission patterns of trichinosis in humans in the United States: comparisons of the periods 1975-1981 and 1982-1986. AU - Bailey,T M, AU - Schantz,P M, PY - 1990/1/1/pubmed PY - 1990/1/1/medline PY - 1990/1/1/entrez SP - 5 EP - 11 JF - Reviews of infectious diseases JO - Rev. Infect. Dis. VL - 12 IS - 1 N2 - Since 1947, the U.S. Public Health Service has recorded statistics on reported cases of trichinosis in humans. More complete clinical and epidemiologic data on cases became available after 1965, when trichinosis was officially made a notifiable disease. The numbers of reported cases declined markedly from an average of approximately 400, with 10-15 deaths reported each year in the late 1940s, to 57 per year, with three deaths in the 5 years 1982-1986. Although annual incidence was highest in sparsely populated Alaska, the highest numbers of cases are reported from the northeastern United States. Food sources of this infection vary in different geographic regions. The decline in annual incidence during the past 12 years appears to be accounted for largely by a decline in the number of cases attributed to commercially purchased pork, although pork products continue to be the major source of infections in humans. The number of cases due to ingestion of wild animal meat have remained relatively constant. Activities at the national and state level that have improved the prospects for control and prevention of trichinosis in commercial products are discussed. SN - 0162-0886 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/2405469/Trends_in_the_incidence_and_transmission_patterns_of_trichinosis_in_humans_in_the_United_States:_comparisons_of_the_periods_1975_1981_and_1982_1986_ L2 - http://www.diseaseinfosearch.org/result/7183 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -
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