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Peer influence on marijuana use in different types of friendships.
J Adolesc Health. 2014 Jan; 54(1):67-73.JA

Abstract

PURPOSE

Although several social network studies have demonstrated peer influence effects on adolescent substance use, findings for marijuana use have been equivocal. This study examines whether structural features of friendships moderate friends' influence on adolescent marijuana use over time.

METHODS

Using 1-year longitudinal data from the National Longitudinal Study of Adolescent Health, this article examines whether three structural features of friendships moderate friends' influence on adolescent marijuana use: whether the friendship is reciprocated, the popularity of the nominated friend, and the popularity/status difference between the nominated friend and the adolescent. The sample consists of students in grade 10/11 at wave I, who were in grade 11/12 at wave II, from two large schools with complete grade-based friendship network data (N = 1,612).

RESULTS

In one school, friends' influence on marijuana use was more likely to occur within mutual, reciprocated friendships compared with nonreciprocated relationships. In the other school, friends' influence was stronger when the friends were relatively popular within the school setting or much more popular than the adolescents themselves.

CONCLUSIONS

Friends' influence on youth marijuana use may play out in different ways, depending on the school context. In one school, influence occurred predominantly within reciprocated relationships that are likely characterized by closeness and trust, whereas in the other school adopting friends' drug use behaviors appeared to be a strategy to attain social status. Further research is needed to better understand the conditions under which structural features of friendships moderate friends' influence on adolescent marijuana use.

Authors+Show Affiliations

RAND Corporation, Santa Monica, California. Electronic address: jtucker@rand.org.RAND Corporation, Santa Monica, California.RAND Corporation, Santa Monica, California.RAND Corporation, Santa Monica, California.RAND Corporation, Santa Monica, California.

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Research Support, N.I.H., Extramural

Language

eng

PubMed ID

24054813

Citation

Tucker, Joan S., et al. "Peer Influence On Marijuana Use in Different Types of Friendships." The Journal of Adolescent Health : Official Publication of the Society for Adolescent Medicine, vol. 54, no. 1, 2014, pp. 67-73.
Tucker JS, de la Haye K, Kennedy DP, et al. Peer influence on marijuana use in different types of friendships. J Adolesc Health. 2014;54(1):67-73.
Tucker, J. S., de la Haye, K., Kennedy, D. P., Green, H. D., & Pollard, M. S. (2014). Peer influence on marijuana use in different types of friendships. The Journal of Adolescent Health : Official Publication of the Society for Adolescent Medicine, 54(1), 67-73. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.jadohealth.2013.07.025
Tucker JS, et al. Peer Influence On Marijuana Use in Different Types of Friendships. J Adolesc Health. 2014;54(1):67-73. PubMed PMID: 24054813.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Peer influence on marijuana use in different types of friendships. AU - Tucker,Joan S, AU - de la Haye,Kayla, AU - Kennedy,David P, AU - Green,Harold D,Jr AU - Pollard,Michael S, Y1 - 2013/09/17/ PY - 2013/03/15/received PY - 2013/07/23/revised PY - 2013/07/24/accepted PY - 2013/9/24/entrez PY - 2013/9/24/pubmed PY - 2014/8/8/medline KW - Adolescent KW - Longitudinal KW - Marijuana KW - Peer influence KW - Social network SP - 67 EP - 73 JF - The Journal of adolescent health : official publication of the Society for Adolescent Medicine JO - J Adolesc Health VL - 54 IS - 1 N2 - PURPOSE: Although several social network studies have demonstrated peer influence effects on adolescent substance use, findings for marijuana use have been equivocal. This study examines whether structural features of friendships moderate friends' influence on adolescent marijuana use over time. METHODS: Using 1-year longitudinal data from the National Longitudinal Study of Adolescent Health, this article examines whether three structural features of friendships moderate friends' influence on adolescent marijuana use: whether the friendship is reciprocated, the popularity of the nominated friend, and the popularity/status difference between the nominated friend and the adolescent. The sample consists of students in grade 10/11 at wave I, who were in grade 11/12 at wave II, from two large schools with complete grade-based friendship network data (N = 1,612). RESULTS: In one school, friends' influence on marijuana use was more likely to occur within mutual, reciprocated friendships compared with nonreciprocated relationships. In the other school, friends' influence was stronger when the friends were relatively popular within the school setting or much more popular than the adolescents themselves. CONCLUSIONS: Friends' influence on youth marijuana use may play out in different ways, depending on the school context. In one school, influence occurred predominantly within reciprocated relationships that are likely characterized by closeness and trust, whereas in the other school adopting friends' drug use behaviors appeared to be a strategy to attain social status. Further research is needed to better understand the conditions under which structural features of friendships moderate friends' influence on adolescent marijuana use. SN - 1879-1972 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/24054813/Peer_influence_on_marijuana_use_in_different_types_of_friendships_ L2 - https://linkinghub.elsevier.com/retrieve/pii/S1054-139X(13)00407-2 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -