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Yellow fever vaccine: an effective vaccine for travelers.
Hum Vaccin Immunother. 2014; 10(1):126-8.HV

Abstract

Yellow fever (YF) is an acute viral communicable disease transmitted by an arbovirus of the Flavivirus genus. It is primarily a zoonotic disease, especially the monkeys. Worldwide, an estimated 200,000 cases of yellow fever occurred each year, and the case-fatality rate is ~15%. Forty-five endemic countries in Africa and Latin America, with a population of close to 1 billion, are at risk. Up to 50% of severely affected persons from YF die without treatment. During 2009, 55 cases and 18 deaths were reported from Brazil, Colombia, and Peru. Brazil reported the maximum number of cases and death, i.e., 42 cases with 11 deaths. From January 2010 to March 2011, outbreaks of YF were reported to the WHO by Cameroon, Democratic Republic of Congo, Cote d'Ivoire, Guinea, Sierra Leone, Senegal, and Uganda. Cases were also reported in three northern districts of Abim, Agago, and Kitugun near the border with South Sudan. YF usually causes fever, muscle pain with prominent backache, headache, shivers, loss of appetite, and nausea or vomiting. Most patients improve, and their symptoms disappear after 3 to 4 d. Half of the patients who enter the toxic phase die within 10-14 d, while the rest recover without significant organ damage. Vaccination has been the single most important measure for preventing YF. The 17D-204 YF vaccine is a freeze-dried, live attenuated, highly effective vaccine. It is available in single-dose or multi-dose vials and should be stored at 2-8 °C. It is reconstituted with normal saline and should be used within 1 h of reconstitution. The 0.5 mL dose is delivered subcutaneously. Revaccination is recommended every 10 y for people at continued risk of exposure to yellow fever virus (YFV). This vaccine is available worldwide. Travelers, especially to Africa or Latin America from Asia, must have a certificate documenting YF vaccination, which is required by certain countries for entry under the International Health Regulations (IHR) of the WHO.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Department of Community Medicine; Pt. B.D. Sharma PGIMS; Rohtak, Haryana India.Department of Community Medicine; Pt. B.D. Sharma PGIMS; Rohtak, Haryana India.Department of Community Medicine; Pt. B.D. Sharma PGIMS; Rohtak, Haryana India.

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article

Language

eng

PubMed ID

24056028

Citation

Verma, Ramesh, et al. "Yellow Fever Vaccine: an Effective Vaccine for Travelers." Human Vaccines & Immunotherapeutics, vol. 10, no. 1, 2014, pp. 126-8.
Verma R, Khanna P, Chawla S. Yellow fever vaccine: an effective vaccine for travelers. Hum Vaccin Immunother. 2014;10(1):126-8.
Verma, R., Khanna, P., & Chawla, S. (2014). Yellow fever vaccine: an effective vaccine for travelers. Human Vaccines & Immunotherapeutics, 10(1), 126-8. https://doi.org/10.4161/hv.26549
Verma R, Khanna P, Chawla S. Yellow Fever Vaccine: an Effective Vaccine for Travelers. Hum Vaccin Immunother. 2014;10(1):126-8. PubMed PMID: 24056028.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Yellow fever vaccine: an effective vaccine for travelers. AU - Verma,Ramesh, AU - Khanna,Pardeep, AU - Chawla,Suraj, Y1 - 2013/09/20/ PY - 2013/9/24/entrez PY - 2013/9/24/pubmed PY - 2015/1/6/medline KW - control KW - quarantine KW - vaccine KW - virus KW - yellow fever SP - 126 EP - 8 JF - Human vaccines & immunotherapeutics JO - Hum Vaccin Immunother VL - 10 IS - 1 N2 - Yellow fever (YF) is an acute viral communicable disease transmitted by an arbovirus of the Flavivirus genus. It is primarily a zoonotic disease, especially the monkeys. Worldwide, an estimated 200,000 cases of yellow fever occurred each year, and the case-fatality rate is ~15%. Forty-five endemic countries in Africa and Latin America, with a population of close to 1 billion, are at risk. Up to 50% of severely affected persons from YF die without treatment. During 2009, 55 cases and 18 deaths were reported from Brazil, Colombia, and Peru. Brazil reported the maximum number of cases and death, i.e., 42 cases with 11 deaths. From January 2010 to March 2011, outbreaks of YF were reported to the WHO by Cameroon, Democratic Republic of Congo, Cote d'Ivoire, Guinea, Sierra Leone, Senegal, and Uganda. Cases were also reported in three northern districts of Abim, Agago, and Kitugun near the border with South Sudan. YF usually causes fever, muscle pain with prominent backache, headache, shivers, loss of appetite, and nausea or vomiting. Most patients improve, and their symptoms disappear after 3 to 4 d. Half of the patients who enter the toxic phase die within 10-14 d, while the rest recover without significant organ damage. Vaccination has been the single most important measure for preventing YF. The 17D-204 YF vaccine is a freeze-dried, live attenuated, highly effective vaccine. It is available in single-dose or multi-dose vials and should be stored at 2-8 °C. It is reconstituted with normal saline and should be used within 1 h of reconstitution. The 0.5 mL dose is delivered subcutaneously. Revaccination is recommended every 10 y for people at continued risk of exposure to yellow fever virus (YFV). This vaccine is available worldwide. Travelers, especially to Africa or Latin America from Asia, must have a certificate documenting YF vaccination, which is required by certain countries for entry under the International Health Regulations (IHR) of the WHO. SN - 2164-554X UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/24056028/Yellow_fever_vaccine:_an_effective_vaccine_for_travelers_ L2 - https://www.tandfonline.com/doi/full/10.4161/hv.26549 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -