Tags

Type your tag names separated by a space and hit enter

Social and self-reflective use of a Web-based personally controlled health management system.
J Med Internet Res. 2013 Sep 23; 15(9):e211.JM

Abstract

BACKGROUND

Personally controlled health management systems (PCHMSs) contain a bundle of features to help patients and consumers manage their health. However, it is unclear how consumers actually use a PCHMS in their everyday settings.

OBJECTIVE

To conduct an empirical analysis of how consumers used the social (forum and poll) and self-reflective (diary and personal health record [PHR]) features of a Web-based PCHMS designed to support their physical and emotional well-being.

METHODS

A single-group pre/post-test online prospective study was conducted to measure use of a Web-based PCHMS for physical and emotional well-being needs during a university academic semester. The PCHMS integrated an untethered PHR with social forums, polls, a diary, and online messaging links with a health service provider. Well-being journeys additionally provided information to encourage engagement with clinicians and health services. A total of 1985 students and staff aged 18 and above with access to the Internet were recruited online, of which 709 were eligible for analysis. Participants' self-reported well-being, health status, health service utilization, and help-seeking behaviors were compared using chi-square, McNemar's test, and Student's t test. Social networks were constructed to examine the online forum communication patterns among consumers and clinicians.

RESULTS

The two PCHMS features that were used most frequently and considered most useful and engaging were the social features (ie, the poll and forum). More than 30% (213/709) of participants who sought well-being assistance during the study indicated that other people had influenced their decision to seek help (54.4%, 386/709 sought assistance for physical well-being; 31.7%, 225/709 for emotional well-being). Although the prevalence of using a self-reflective feature (diary or PHR) was not as high (diary: 8.6%, 61/709; PHR: 15.0%, 106/709), the proportion of participants who visited a health care professional during the study was more than 20% greater in the group that did use a self-reflective feature (diary: P=.03; PHR: P<.001).

CONCLUSIONS

There was variation in the degree to which consumers used social and self-reflective PCHMS features but both were significantly associated with increased help-seeking behaviors and health service utilization. A PCHMS should combine both self-reflective as well as socially driven components to most effectively influence consumers' help-seeking behaviors.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Centre for Health Informatics, Australian Institute of Health Innovation, University of New South Wales, Sydney, Australia. a.lau@unsw.edu.auNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't

Language

eng

PubMed ID

24064188

Citation

Lau, Annie Ys, et al. "Social and Self-reflective Use of a Web-based Personally Controlled Health Management System." Journal of Medical Internet Research, vol. 15, no. 9, 2013, pp. e211.
Lau AY, Dunn AG, Mortimer N, et al. Social and self-reflective use of a Web-based personally controlled health management system. J Med Internet Res. 2013;15(9):e211.
Lau, A. Y., Dunn, A. G., Mortimer, N., Gallagher, A., Proudfoot, J., Andrews, A., Liaw, S. T., Crimmins, J., Arguel, A., & Coiera, E. (2013). Social and self-reflective use of a Web-based personally controlled health management system. Journal of Medical Internet Research, 15(9), e211. https://doi.org/10.2196/jmir.2682
Lau AY, et al. Social and Self-reflective Use of a Web-based Personally Controlled Health Management System. J Med Internet Res. 2013 Sep 23;15(9):e211. PubMed PMID: 24064188.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Social and self-reflective use of a Web-based personally controlled health management system. AU - Lau,Annie Ys, AU - Dunn,Adam G, AU - Mortimer,Nathan, AU - Gallagher,Aideen, AU - Proudfoot,Judith, AU - Andrews,Annie, AU - Liaw,Siaw-Teng, AU - Crimmins,Jacinta, AU - Arguel,Amaël, AU - Coiera,Enrico, Y1 - 2013/09/23/ PY - 2013/04/23/received PY - 2013/08/29/accepted PY - 2013/08/01/revised PY - 2013/9/26/entrez PY - 2013/9/26/pubmed PY - 2014/4/26/medline KW - Internet intervention KW - consumer KW - eHealth KW - emotional well-being KW - health service KW - help-seeking KW - personal health record KW - physical well-being KW - preventative health KW - social networks KW - university SP - e211 EP - e211 JF - Journal of medical Internet research JO - J Med Internet Res VL - 15 IS - 9 N2 - BACKGROUND: Personally controlled health management systems (PCHMSs) contain a bundle of features to help patients and consumers manage their health. However, it is unclear how consumers actually use a PCHMS in their everyday settings. OBJECTIVE: To conduct an empirical analysis of how consumers used the social (forum and poll) and self-reflective (diary and personal health record [PHR]) features of a Web-based PCHMS designed to support their physical and emotional well-being. METHODS: A single-group pre/post-test online prospective study was conducted to measure use of a Web-based PCHMS for physical and emotional well-being needs during a university academic semester. The PCHMS integrated an untethered PHR with social forums, polls, a diary, and online messaging links with a health service provider. Well-being journeys additionally provided information to encourage engagement with clinicians and health services. A total of 1985 students and staff aged 18 and above with access to the Internet were recruited online, of which 709 were eligible for analysis. Participants' self-reported well-being, health status, health service utilization, and help-seeking behaviors were compared using chi-square, McNemar's test, and Student's t test. Social networks were constructed to examine the online forum communication patterns among consumers and clinicians. RESULTS: The two PCHMS features that were used most frequently and considered most useful and engaging were the social features (ie, the poll and forum). More than 30% (213/709) of participants who sought well-being assistance during the study indicated that other people had influenced their decision to seek help (54.4%, 386/709 sought assistance for physical well-being; 31.7%, 225/709 for emotional well-being). Although the prevalence of using a self-reflective feature (diary or PHR) was not as high (diary: 8.6%, 61/709; PHR: 15.0%, 106/709), the proportion of participants who visited a health care professional during the study was more than 20% greater in the group that did use a self-reflective feature (diary: P=.03; PHR: P<.001). CONCLUSIONS: There was variation in the degree to which consumers used social and self-reflective PCHMS features but both were significantly associated with increased help-seeking behaviors and health service utilization. A PCHMS should combine both self-reflective as well as socially driven components to most effectively influence consumers' help-seeking behaviors. SN - 1438-8871 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/24064188/Social_and_self_reflective_use_of_a_Web_based_personally_controlled_health_management_system_ L2 - https://www.jmir.org/2013/9/e211/ DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -