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Adaptation to emotional conflict: evidence from a novel face emotion paradigm.
PLoS One. 2013; 8(9):e75776.Plos

Abstract

The preponderance of research on trial-by-trial recruitment of affective control (e.g., conflict adaptation) relies on stimuli wherein lexical word information conflicts with facial affective stimulus properties (e.g., the face-Stroop paradigm where an emotional word is overlaid on a facial expression). Several studies, however, indicate different neural time course and properties for processing of affective lexical stimuli versus affective facial stimuli. The current investigation used a novel task to examine control processes implemented following conflicting emotional stimuli with conflict-inducing affective face stimuli in the absence of affective words. Forty-one individuals completed a task wherein the affective-valence of the eyes and mouth were either congruent (happy eyes, happy mouth) or incongruent (happy eyes, angry mouth) while high-density event-related potentials (ERPs) were recorded. There was a significant congruency effect and significant conflict adaptation effects for error rates. Although response times (RTs) showed a significant congruency effect, the effect of previous-trial congruency on current-trial RTs was only present for current congruent trials. Temporospatial principal components analysis showed a P3-like ERP source localized using FieldTrip software to the medial cingulate gyrus that was smaller on incongruent than congruent trials and was significantly influenced by the recruitment of control processes following previous-trial emotional conflict (i.e., there was significant conflict adaptation in the ERPs). Results show that a face-only paradigm may be sufficient to elicit emotional conflict and suggest a system for rapidly detecting conflicting emotional stimuli and subsequently adjusting control resources, similar to cognitive conflict detection processes, when using conflicting facial expressions without words.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Department of Psychology, University of California Los Angeles, Los Angeles, California, United States of America ; Department of Psychology, Brigham Young University, Provo, Utah, United States of America.No affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't

Language

eng

PubMed ID

24073278

Citation

Clayson, Peter E., and Michael J. Larson. "Adaptation to Emotional Conflict: Evidence From a Novel Face Emotion Paradigm." PloS One, vol. 8, no. 9, 2013, pp. e75776.
Clayson PE, Larson MJ. Adaptation to emotional conflict: evidence from a novel face emotion paradigm. PLoS One. 2013;8(9):e75776.
Clayson, P. E., & Larson, M. J. (2013). Adaptation to emotional conflict: evidence from a novel face emotion paradigm. PloS One, 8(9), e75776. https://doi.org/10.1371/journal.pone.0075776
Clayson PE, Larson MJ. Adaptation to Emotional Conflict: Evidence From a Novel Face Emotion Paradigm. PLoS One. 2013;8(9):e75776. PubMed PMID: 24073278.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Adaptation to emotional conflict: evidence from a novel face emotion paradigm. AU - Clayson,Peter E, AU - Larson,Michael J, Y1 - 2013/09/20/ PY - 2013/04/08/received PY - 2013/08/19/accepted PY - 2013/9/28/entrez PY - 2013/9/28/pubmed PY - 2014/5/28/medline SP - e75776 EP - e75776 JF - PloS one JO - PLoS One VL - 8 IS - 9 N2 - The preponderance of research on trial-by-trial recruitment of affective control (e.g., conflict adaptation) relies on stimuli wherein lexical word information conflicts with facial affective stimulus properties (e.g., the face-Stroop paradigm where an emotional word is overlaid on a facial expression). Several studies, however, indicate different neural time course and properties for processing of affective lexical stimuli versus affective facial stimuli. The current investigation used a novel task to examine control processes implemented following conflicting emotional stimuli with conflict-inducing affective face stimuli in the absence of affective words. Forty-one individuals completed a task wherein the affective-valence of the eyes and mouth were either congruent (happy eyes, happy mouth) or incongruent (happy eyes, angry mouth) while high-density event-related potentials (ERPs) were recorded. There was a significant congruency effect and significant conflict adaptation effects for error rates. Although response times (RTs) showed a significant congruency effect, the effect of previous-trial congruency on current-trial RTs was only present for current congruent trials. Temporospatial principal components analysis showed a P3-like ERP source localized using FieldTrip software to the medial cingulate gyrus that was smaller on incongruent than congruent trials and was significantly influenced by the recruitment of control processes following previous-trial emotional conflict (i.e., there was significant conflict adaptation in the ERPs). Results show that a face-only paradigm may be sufficient to elicit emotional conflict and suggest a system for rapidly detecting conflicting emotional stimuli and subsequently adjusting control resources, similar to cognitive conflict detection processes, when using conflicting facial expressions without words. SN - 1932-6203 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/24073278/Adaptation_to_emotional_conflict:_evidence_from_a_novel_face_emotion_paradigm_ L2 - https://dx.plos.org/10.1371/journal.pone.0075776 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -