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Incontinence in individuals with Angelman syndrome: a comparative study.
Res Dev Disabil. 2013 Nov; 34(11):4184-93.RD

Abstract

Frequency and type of incontinence and variables associated with incontinence were assessed in individuals with Angelman syndrome (AS; n=71) and in a matched control group (n=69) consisting of individuals with non-specific intellectual disability (ID). A Dutch version of the "Parental Questionnaire: Enuresis/Urinary Incontinence" (Beetz, von Gontard, & Lettgen, 1994) was administered and information on primary caretakers' perspectives regarding each individual's incontinence was gathered. Results show that diurnal incontinence and fecal incontinence during the day more frequently occurred in the control group than in the AS group. In both groups, nocturnal enuresis was the most common form of incontinence. More incontinence was seen in individuals with AS who were younger, had a lower level of adaptive functioning and/or had epilepsy. Individuals with AS were able to stay dry for longer periods of time than the controls and often showed both in-toilet urination and urinary accidents during the day, whereas accidents and correct voids during the day were more set apart in the control group. Also, persons with AS had a lower micturition frequency implying possible voiding postponement. Both groups showed high rates of LUTS (lower urinary tract symptoms) possibly indicative of functional bladder disorders such as voiding postponement, dysfunctional voiding, or even an underactive bladder. In general, most primary caretakers reported severe intellectual disability as the main cause for urinary incontinence. Based on these results incontinence does not appear to be part of the behavioral phenotype of Angelman syndrome. Therefore, pediatric or urologic diagnostics and treatment are recommended for all persons with incontinence and intellectual disability. Further implications for practice and research are given.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Department of Special Education, Radboud University Nijmegen, The Netherlands; Daelzicht, Heel, The Netherlands. Electronic address: m.radstaake@pwo.ru.nl.No affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't

Language

eng

PubMed ID

24076983

Citation

Radstaake, Maartje, et al. "Incontinence in Individuals With Angelman Syndrome: a Comparative Study." Research in Developmental Disabilities, vol. 34, no. 11, 2013, pp. 4184-93.
Radstaake M, Didden R, Giesbers S, et al. Incontinence in individuals with Angelman syndrome: a comparative study. Res Dev Disabil. 2013;34(11):4184-93.
Radstaake, M., Didden, R., Giesbers, S., Korzilius, H., Peters-Scheffer, N., Lang, R., von Gontard, A., & Curfs, L. M. (2013). Incontinence in individuals with Angelman syndrome: a comparative study. Research in Developmental Disabilities, 34(11), 4184-93. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.ridd.2013.09.007
Radstaake M, et al. Incontinence in Individuals With Angelman Syndrome: a Comparative Study. Res Dev Disabil. 2013;34(11):4184-93. PubMed PMID: 24076983.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Incontinence in individuals with Angelman syndrome: a comparative study. AU - Radstaake,Maartje, AU - Didden,Robert, AU - Giesbers,Sanne, AU - Korzilius,Hubert, AU - Peters-Scheffer,Nienke, AU - Lang,Russell, AU - von Gontard,Alexander, AU - Curfs,Leopold M G, Y1 - 2013/09/26/ PY - 2013/02/11/received PY - 2013/09/02/revised PY - 2013/09/03/accepted PY - 2013/10/1/entrez PY - 2013/10/1/pubmed PY - 2014/7/6/medline KW - Angelman syndrome KW - Behavioral phenotype KW - Incontinence KW - Intellectual disability SP - 4184 EP - 93 JF - Research in developmental disabilities JO - Res Dev Disabil VL - 34 IS - 11 N2 - Frequency and type of incontinence and variables associated with incontinence were assessed in individuals with Angelman syndrome (AS; n=71) and in a matched control group (n=69) consisting of individuals with non-specific intellectual disability (ID). A Dutch version of the "Parental Questionnaire: Enuresis/Urinary Incontinence" (Beetz, von Gontard, & Lettgen, 1994) was administered and information on primary caretakers' perspectives regarding each individual's incontinence was gathered. Results show that diurnal incontinence and fecal incontinence during the day more frequently occurred in the control group than in the AS group. In both groups, nocturnal enuresis was the most common form of incontinence. More incontinence was seen in individuals with AS who were younger, had a lower level of adaptive functioning and/or had epilepsy. Individuals with AS were able to stay dry for longer periods of time than the controls and often showed both in-toilet urination and urinary accidents during the day, whereas accidents and correct voids during the day were more set apart in the control group. Also, persons with AS had a lower micturition frequency implying possible voiding postponement. Both groups showed high rates of LUTS (lower urinary tract symptoms) possibly indicative of functional bladder disorders such as voiding postponement, dysfunctional voiding, or even an underactive bladder. In general, most primary caretakers reported severe intellectual disability as the main cause for urinary incontinence. Based on these results incontinence does not appear to be part of the behavioral phenotype of Angelman syndrome. Therefore, pediatric or urologic diagnostics and treatment are recommended for all persons with incontinence and intellectual disability. Further implications for practice and research are given. SN - 1873-3379 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/24076983/Incontinence_in_individuals_with_Angelman_syndrome:_a_comparative_study_ L2 - https://linkinghub.elsevier.com/retrieve/pii/S0891-4222(13)00401-0 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -