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Identifying the intergenerational effects of the 1959-1961 Chinese Great Leap Forward Famine on infant mortality.
Econ Hum Biol 2013; 11(4):474-87EH

Abstract

Using the 1959-1961 Chinese Great Leap Forward Famine as a natural experiment, this study examines the relationship between mothers' prenatal exposure to acute malnutrition and their children's infant mortality risk. According to the results, the effect of mothers' prenatal famine exposure status on children's infant mortality risk depends on the level of famine severity. In regions of low famine severity, mothers' prenatal famine exposure significantly reduces children's infant mortality, whereas in regions of high famine severity, such prenatal exposure increases children's infant mortality although the effect is not statistically significant. Such a curvilinear relationship between mothers' prenatal malnutrition status and their children's infant mortality risk is more complicated than the linear relationship predicted by the original fetal origins hypothesis but is consistent with the more recent developmental origins of health and disease theory.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Queens College & CUNY Institute for Demographic Research, City University of New York, 65-30 Kissena Blvd., Queens, NY 11367, USA. Electronic address: shige.song@qc.cuny.edu.

Pub Type(s)

Historical Article
Journal Article

Language

eng

PubMed ID

24095302

Citation

Song, Shige. "Identifying the Intergenerational Effects of the 1959-1961 Chinese Great Leap Forward Famine On Infant Mortality." Economics and Human Biology, vol. 11, no. 4, 2013, pp. 474-87.
Song S. Identifying the intergenerational effects of the 1959-1961 Chinese Great Leap Forward Famine on infant mortality. Econ Hum Biol. 2013;11(4):474-87.
Song, S. (2013). Identifying the intergenerational effects of the 1959-1961 Chinese Great Leap Forward Famine on infant mortality. Economics and Human Biology, 11(4), pp. 474-87. doi:10.1016/j.ehb.2013.08.001.
Song S. Identifying the Intergenerational Effects of the 1959-1961 Chinese Great Leap Forward Famine On Infant Mortality. Econ Hum Biol. 2013;11(4):474-87. PubMed PMID: 24095302.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Identifying the intergenerational effects of the 1959-1961 Chinese Great Leap Forward Famine on infant mortality. A1 - Song,Shige, Y1 - 2013/09/12/ PY - 2013/03/27/received PY - 2013/08/26/revised PY - 2013/08/26/accepted PY - 2013/10/8/entrez PY - 2013/10/8/pubmed PY - 2014/7/31/medline KW - China KW - Developmental origins of health and disease KW - Famine KW - Great Leap Forward KW - Infant mortality SP - 474 EP - 87 JF - Economics and human biology JO - Econ Hum Biol VL - 11 IS - 4 N2 - Using the 1959-1961 Chinese Great Leap Forward Famine as a natural experiment, this study examines the relationship between mothers' prenatal exposure to acute malnutrition and their children's infant mortality risk. According to the results, the effect of mothers' prenatal famine exposure status on children's infant mortality risk depends on the level of famine severity. In regions of low famine severity, mothers' prenatal famine exposure significantly reduces children's infant mortality, whereas in regions of high famine severity, such prenatal exposure increases children's infant mortality although the effect is not statistically significant. Such a curvilinear relationship between mothers' prenatal malnutrition status and their children's infant mortality risk is more complicated than the linear relationship predicted by the original fetal origins hypothesis but is consistent with the more recent developmental origins of health and disease theory. SN - 1873-6130 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/24095302/Identifying_the_intergenerational_effects_of_the_1959_1961_Chinese_Great_Leap_Forward_Famine_on_infant_mortality_ L2 - https://linkinghub.elsevier.com/retrieve/pii/S1570-677X(13)00088-9 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -