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Temperamental precursors of infant attachment with mothers and fathers.
Infant Behav Dev. 2013 Dec; 36(4):796-808.IB

Abstract

The degree to which parent sensitivity and infant temperament distinguish attachment classification was examined. Multilevel modeling was used to assess the effect of parent sensitivity and infant temperament on infant-mother and infant-father attachment. Data were collected from mothers, fathers, and their infants (N = 135) when the infant was 3-, 5-, 7-, 12-, and 14-months old. Temperament was measured using the Infant Behavior Questionnaire-Revised (Gartstein & Rothbart, 2003); parent sensitivity was coded during the Still Face Paradigm (Tronick, Als, Adamson, Wise, & Brazelton, 1978); attachment was coded using the Strange Situation (Ainsworth, Blehar, Waters, & Wall, 1978). Results indicate that mothers and fathers were less sensitive with insecure-avoidant infants. Whereas only one difference was found for infant-mother attachment groups and temperament, five significant differences emerged for infant-father attachment groups, with the majority involving insecure-ambivalent attachment. Infants classified as ambivalent with fathers were higher in perceptual sensitivity and cuddliness and these infants also showed a greater increase in low-intensity pleasure over time compared with other infants. Results indicate the importance of both parent sensitivity and infant temperament, though operating in somewhat different ways, in the development of the infant-mother and infant-father attachment relationship.

Authors+Show Affiliations

University of Notre Dame, United States. Electronic address: eplanalp@nd.edu.No affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Research Support, N.I.H., Extramural

Language

eng

PubMed ID

24103401

Citation

Planalp, Elizabeth M., and Julia M. Braungart-Rieker. "Temperamental Precursors of Infant Attachment With Mothers and Fathers." Infant Behavior & Development, vol. 36, no. 4, 2013, pp. 796-808.
Planalp EM, Braungart-Rieker JM. Temperamental precursors of infant attachment with mothers and fathers. Infant Behav Dev. 2013;36(4):796-808.
Planalp, E. M., & Braungart-Rieker, J. M. (2013). Temperamental precursors of infant attachment with mothers and fathers. Infant Behavior & Development, 36(4), 796-808. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.infbeh.2013.09.004
Planalp EM, Braungart-Rieker JM. Temperamental Precursors of Infant Attachment With Mothers and Fathers. Infant Behav Dev. 2013;36(4):796-808. PubMed PMID: 24103401.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Temperamental precursors of infant attachment with mothers and fathers. AU - Planalp,Elizabeth M, AU - Braungart-Rieker,Julia M, Y1 - 2013/10/05/ PY - 2013/05/24/received PY - 2013/08/02/revised PY - 2013/09/11/accepted PY - 2013/10/10/entrez PY - 2013/10/10/pubmed PY - 2014/6/15/medline KW - Attachment KW - Fathers KW - Infant temperament KW - Parent sensitivity SP - 796 EP - 808 JF - Infant behavior & development JO - Infant Behav Dev VL - 36 IS - 4 N2 - The degree to which parent sensitivity and infant temperament distinguish attachment classification was examined. Multilevel modeling was used to assess the effect of parent sensitivity and infant temperament on infant-mother and infant-father attachment. Data were collected from mothers, fathers, and their infants (N = 135) when the infant was 3-, 5-, 7-, 12-, and 14-months old. Temperament was measured using the Infant Behavior Questionnaire-Revised (Gartstein & Rothbart, 2003); parent sensitivity was coded during the Still Face Paradigm (Tronick, Als, Adamson, Wise, & Brazelton, 1978); attachment was coded using the Strange Situation (Ainsworth, Blehar, Waters, & Wall, 1978). Results indicate that mothers and fathers were less sensitive with insecure-avoidant infants. Whereas only one difference was found for infant-mother attachment groups and temperament, five significant differences emerged for infant-father attachment groups, with the majority involving insecure-ambivalent attachment. Infants classified as ambivalent with fathers were higher in perceptual sensitivity and cuddliness and these infants also showed a greater increase in low-intensity pleasure over time compared with other infants. Results indicate the importance of both parent sensitivity and infant temperament, though operating in somewhat different ways, in the development of the infant-mother and infant-father attachment relationship. SN - 1934-8800 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/24103401/Temperamental_precursors_of_infant_attachment_with_mothers_and_fathers_ L2 - https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/pmid/24103401/ DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -