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Review article: the association of diet with onset and relapse in patients with inflammatory bowel disease.
Aliment Pharmacol Ther 2013; 38(10):1172-87AP

Abstract

BACKGROUND

The role of diet in inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) is supported by migration studies and increasing incidences in line with Westernisation.

AIM

To give a complete overview of studies associating habitual diet with the onset or relapses in ulcerative colitis (UC) or Crohn's disease (CD).

METHODS

A structured search in Pubmed, the Cochrane Library and EMBASE was performed using defined key words, including only full text papers in English language.

RESULTS

Forty-one studies were identified, investigating onset (n = 35), relapses (n = 5) or both (n = 1). Several studies reported high intake of sugar or sugar-containing foods (n = 7 UC, n = 12 CD), and low intake of fruits and/or vegetables (n = 5 UC, n = 10 CD) to be associated with an increased onset risk. However, these findings could not be confirmed by similar or higher numbers of other studies. A possible protective role was found for grain-derived products in CD onset, but results were inconsistent for dietary fibre in UC and CD and grain-derived products in UC. No definite conclusions could be drawn for unsaturated fatty acids (UFA), protein and energy intake due to limited and/or inconsistent results. Six studies reported on diet and relapse risk, of which only two (n = 1 UC, n = 1 CD) had a prospective follow-up.

CONCLUSIONS

The current evidence is not sufficient to draw firm conclusions on the role of specific food components or nutrients in the aetiology of IBD. Furthermore, large prospective studies into the role of habitual diet as a trigger of relapses are needed, to identify new therapeutic or preventive targets.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Division of Gastroenterology - Hepatology, Maastricht University Medical Center+, Maastricht, The Netherlands; School for Nutrition, Toxicology and Metabolism (NUTRIM), Maastricht University Medical Center+, Maastricht, The Netherlands.No affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Review

Language

eng

PubMed ID

24118051

Citation

Spooren, C E G M., et al. "Review Article: the Association of Diet With Onset and Relapse in Patients With Inflammatory Bowel Disease." Alimentary Pharmacology & Therapeutics, vol. 38, no. 10, 2013, pp. 1172-87.
Spooren CE, Pierik MJ, Zeegers MP, et al. Review article: the association of diet with onset and relapse in patients with inflammatory bowel disease. Aliment Pharmacol Ther. 2013;38(10):1172-87.
Spooren, C. E., Pierik, M. J., Zeegers, M. P., Feskens, E. J., Masclee, A. A., & Jonkers, D. M. (2013). Review article: the association of diet with onset and relapse in patients with inflammatory bowel disease. Alimentary Pharmacology & Therapeutics, 38(10), pp. 1172-87. doi:10.1111/apt.12501.
Spooren CE, et al. Review Article: the Association of Diet With Onset and Relapse in Patients With Inflammatory Bowel Disease. Aliment Pharmacol Ther. 2013;38(10):1172-87. PubMed PMID: 24118051.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Review article: the association of diet with onset and relapse in patients with inflammatory bowel disease. AU - Spooren,C E G M, AU - Pierik,M J, AU - Zeegers,M P, AU - Feskens,E J M, AU - Masclee,A A M, AU - Jonkers,D M A E, Y1 - 2013/10/03/ PY - 2013/03/29/received PY - 2013/04/29/revised PY - 2013/08/14/revised PY - 2013/08/30/accepted PY - 2013/10/15/entrez PY - 2013/10/15/pubmed PY - 2014/9/27/medline SP - 1172 EP - 87 JF - Alimentary pharmacology & therapeutics JO - Aliment. Pharmacol. Ther. VL - 38 IS - 10 N2 - BACKGROUND: The role of diet in inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) is supported by migration studies and increasing incidences in line with Westernisation. AIM: To give a complete overview of studies associating habitual diet with the onset or relapses in ulcerative colitis (UC) or Crohn's disease (CD). METHODS: A structured search in Pubmed, the Cochrane Library and EMBASE was performed using defined key words, including only full text papers in English language. RESULTS: Forty-one studies were identified, investigating onset (n = 35), relapses (n = 5) or both (n = 1). Several studies reported high intake of sugar or sugar-containing foods (n = 7 UC, n = 12 CD), and low intake of fruits and/or vegetables (n = 5 UC, n = 10 CD) to be associated with an increased onset risk. However, these findings could not be confirmed by similar or higher numbers of other studies. A possible protective role was found for grain-derived products in CD onset, but results were inconsistent for dietary fibre in UC and CD and grain-derived products in UC. No definite conclusions could be drawn for unsaturated fatty acids (UFA), protein and energy intake due to limited and/or inconsistent results. Six studies reported on diet and relapse risk, of which only two (n = 1 UC, n = 1 CD) had a prospective follow-up. CONCLUSIONS: The current evidence is not sufficient to draw firm conclusions on the role of specific food components or nutrients in the aetiology of IBD. Furthermore, large prospective studies into the role of habitual diet as a trigger of relapses are needed, to identify new therapeutic or preventive targets. SN - 1365-2036 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/24118051/Review_article:_the_association_of_diet_with_onset_and_relapse_in_patients_with_inflammatory_bowel_disease_ L2 - https://doi.org/10.1111/apt.12501 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -