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Physical inactivity affects skeletal muscle insulin signaling in a birth weight-dependent manner.
J Diabetes Complications. 2014 Jan-Feb; 28(1):71-8.JD

Abstract

AIMS

We investigated whether physical inactivity could unmask defects in insulin and AMPK signaling in low birth weight (LBW) subjects.

METHODS

Twenty LBW and 20 normal birth weight (NBW) subjects were investigated using the euglycemic-hyperinsulinemic clamp with excision of skeletal muscle biopsies pre and post 9days of bed rest. Employing Western blotting, we investigated skeletal muscle Akt, AS160, GLUT4, and AMPK signaling.

RESULTS

Peripheral insulin action was similar in the two groups and was decreased to the same extent post bed rest. Insulin and AMPK signaling was unaffected by bed rest in NBW individuals. LBW subjects showed decreased insulin-stimulated Akt phosphorylation and increased AMPK α1 and γ3 protein expression post bed rest. Insulin response of AS160 phosphorylation was lower in LBW subjects both pre and post bed rest.

CONCLUSIONS

Bed rest-induced insulin resistance is not explained by impaired muscle insulin or AMPK signaling in subjects with or without LBW. Lower muscle insulin signaling in LBW subjects post bed rest despite similar degree of insulin resistance as seen in controls may to some extent support the idea that LBW subjects are at higher risk of developing type 2 diabetes when being physically inactive.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Steno Diabetes Center, Gentofte, Denmark; Molecular Physiology Group, The August Krogh Centre, Department of Nutrition, Exercise and Sports, University of Copenhagen. Electronic address: brym@steno.dk.Steno Diabetes Center, Gentofte, Denmark; Molecular Physiology Group, The August Krogh Centre, Department of Nutrition, Exercise and Sports, University of Copenhagen.Molecular Physiology Group, The August Krogh Centre, Department of Nutrition, Exercise and Sports, University of Copenhagen.Steno Diabetes Center, Gentofte, Denmark.Department of Biomedical Sciences, University of Copenhagen; Center for Healthy Ageing, University of Copenhagen.Department of Biomedical Sciences, University of Copenhagen; Center for Healthy Ageing, University of Copenhagen.Department of Biomedical Sciences, University of Copenhagen.Department of Biomedical Sciences, University of Copenhagen; Center for Healthy Ageing, University of Copenhagen.Molecular Physiology Group, The August Krogh Centre, Department of Nutrition, Exercise and Sports, University of Copenhagen.Steno Diabetes Center, Gentofte, Denmark; Rigshospitalet, Department of Endocrinology, Denmark.

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't

Language

eng

PubMed ID

24120282

Citation

Mortensen, Brynjulf, et al. "Physical Inactivity Affects Skeletal Muscle Insulin Signaling in a Birth Weight-dependent Manner." Journal of Diabetes and Its Complications, vol. 28, no. 1, 2014, pp. 71-8.
Mortensen B, Friedrichsen M, Andersen NR, et al. Physical inactivity affects skeletal muscle insulin signaling in a birth weight-dependent manner. J Diabetes Complications. 2014;28(1):71-8.
Mortensen, B., Friedrichsen, M., Andersen, N. R., Alibegovic, A. C., Højbjerre, L., Sonne, M. P., Stallknecht, B., Dela, F., Wojtaszewski, J. F., & Vaag, A. (2014). Physical inactivity affects skeletal muscle insulin signaling in a birth weight-dependent manner. Journal of Diabetes and Its Complications, 28(1), 71-8. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.jdiacomp.2013.09.002
Mortensen B, et al. Physical Inactivity Affects Skeletal Muscle Insulin Signaling in a Birth Weight-dependent Manner. J Diabetes Complications. 2014 Jan-Feb;28(1):71-8. PubMed PMID: 24120282.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Physical inactivity affects skeletal muscle insulin signaling in a birth weight-dependent manner. AU - Mortensen,Brynjulf, AU - Friedrichsen,Martin, AU - Andersen,Nicoline R, AU - Alibegovic,Amra C, AU - Højbjerre,Lise, AU - Sonne,Mette P, AU - Stallknecht,Bente, AU - Dela,Flemming, AU - Wojtaszewski,Jørgen F P, AU - Vaag,Allan, Y1 - 2013/10/10/ PY - 2013/06/19/received PY - 2013/09/03/revised PY - 2013/09/05/accepted PY - 2013/10/15/entrez PY - 2013/10/15/pubmed PY - 2014/8/29/medline KW - AMPK KW - Fetal programming KW - Muscle signaling KW - Physical inactivity SP - 71 EP - 8 JF - Journal of diabetes and its complications JO - J Diabetes Complications VL - 28 IS - 1 N2 - AIMS: We investigated whether physical inactivity could unmask defects in insulin and AMPK signaling in low birth weight (LBW) subjects. METHODS: Twenty LBW and 20 normal birth weight (NBW) subjects were investigated using the euglycemic-hyperinsulinemic clamp with excision of skeletal muscle biopsies pre and post 9days of bed rest. Employing Western blotting, we investigated skeletal muscle Akt, AS160, GLUT4, and AMPK signaling. RESULTS: Peripheral insulin action was similar in the two groups and was decreased to the same extent post bed rest. Insulin and AMPK signaling was unaffected by bed rest in NBW individuals. LBW subjects showed decreased insulin-stimulated Akt phosphorylation and increased AMPK α1 and γ3 protein expression post bed rest. Insulin response of AS160 phosphorylation was lower in LBW subjects both pre and post bed rest. CONCLUSIONS: Bed rest-induced insulin resistance is not explained by impaired muscle insulin or AMPK signaling in subjects with or without LBW. Lower muscle insulin signaling in LBW subjects post bed rest despite similar degree of insulin resistance as seen in controls may to some extent support the idea that LBW subjects are at higher risk of developing type 2 diabetes when being physically inactive. SN - 1873-460X UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/24120282/Physical_inactivity_affects_skeletal_muscle_insulin_signaling_in_a_birth_weight_dependent_manner_ L2 - https://linkinghub.elsevier.com/retrieve/pii/S1056-8727(13)00205-5 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -