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Accumulation and toxicity of metal oxide nanoparticles in a soft-sediment estuarine amphipod.
Aquat Toxicol. 2013 Oct 15; 142-143:441-6.AT

Abstract

Estuarine and marine sediments are a probable end point for many engineered nanoparticles (ENPs) due to enhanced aggregation and sedimentation in marine waters, as well as uptake and deposition by suspension-feeding organisms on the seafloor. Benthic infaunal organisms living in sediments encounter relatively high concentrations of pollutants and may also suffer toxic effects of ENPs. We tested whether three heavily used metal oxide ENPs, zinc oxide (ZnO), copper oxide (CuO), and nickel oxide (NiO) were toxic to an estuarine amphipod, Leptocheirus plumulosus. We used results from 10-day laboratory bioassays to estimate potential demographic impacts of ENP exposure. We also evaluated fate and transport pathways of the ENPs in the experiments to elucidate routes of uptake and exposure. Dissolved Zn was found in sediment pore water and overlying water samples at 10 fold the concentrations of Cu or Ni, a pattern indicative of the relatively high dissolution rate of ZnO ENPs compared with CuO and NiO ENPs. Accumulation of metals in amphipod tissues increased with exposure concentrations for all three ENPs, suggesting possible exposure pathways to higher taxa. Amphipods accumulated ≤600 μg Zn and Cu g(-1) and 1000 μg Ni g(-1). Amphipod mortality increased with ZnO and CuO concentrations, but showed no significant increase with NiO to concentrations as high as 2000 μg g(-1). The median lethal concentration in sediment (LC50) of ZnO was 763 μg g(-1) and 868 μg g(-1) for CuO ENPs. Our results indicate that ZnO and CuO ENPs, but not NiO ENPs, are toxic to L. plumulosus and that ZnO toxicity primarily results from Zn ion exposure while CuO toxicity is due to nanoparticle exposure.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Bren School of Environmental Science and Management, University of California Santa Barbara, Santa Barbara, CA 93106, United States; University of California Center for the Environmental Implications of Nanotechnology, University of California Santa Barbara, Santa Barbara, CA 93106, United States. Electronic address: hanna.shannonk@gmail.com.No affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Research Support, U.S. Gov't, Non-P.H.S.

Language

eng

PubMed ID

24121101

Citation

Hanna, Shannon K., et al. "Accumulation and Toxicity of Metal Oxide Nanoparticles in a Soft-sediment Estuarine Amphipod." Aquatic Toxicology (Amsterdam, Netherlands), vol. 142-143, 2013, pp. 441-6.
Hanna SK, Miller RJ, Zhou D, et al. Accumulation and toxicity of metal oxide nanoparticles in a soft-sediment estuarine amphipod. Aquat Toxicol. 2013;142-143:441-6.
Hanna, S. K., Miller, R. J., Zhou, D., Keller, A. A., & Lenihan, H. S. (2013). Accumulation and toxicity of metal oxide nanoparticles in a soft-sediment estuarine amphipod. Aquatic Toxicology (Amsterdam, Netherlands), 142-143, 441-6. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.aquatox.2013.09.019
Hanna SK, et al. Accumulation and Toxicity of Metal Oxide Nanoparticles in a Soft-sediment Estuarine Amphipod. Aquat Toxicol. 2013 Oct 15;142-143:441-6. PubMed PMID: 24121101.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Accumulation and toxicity of metal oxide nanoparticles in a soft-sediment estuarine amphipod. AU - Hanna,Shannon K, AU - Miller,Robert J, AU - Zhou,Dongxu, AU - Keller,Arturo A, AU - Lenihan,Hunter S, Y1 - 2013/09/25/ PY - 2013/06/28/received PY - 2013/09/16/revised PY - 2013/09/17/accepted PY - 2013/10/15/entrez PY - 2013/10/15/pubmed PY - 2014/3/22/medline KW - Amphipods KW - Copper KW - Nanomaterials KW - Nanoparticles KW - Nickel KW - Zinc SP - 441 EP - 6 JF - Aquatic toxicology (Amsterdam, Netherlands) JO - Aquat Toxicol VL - 142-143 N2 - Estuarine and marine sediments are a probable end point for many engineered nanoparticles (ENPs) due to enhanced aggregation and sedimentation in marine waters, as well as uptake and deposition by suspension-feeding organisms on the seafloor. Benthic infaunal organisms living in sediments encounter relatively high concentrations of pollutants and may also suffer toxic effects of ENPs. We tested whether three heavily used metal oxide ENPs, zinc oxide (ZnO), copper oxide (CuO), and nickel oxide (NiO) were toxic to an estuarine amphipod, Leptocheirus plumulosus. We used results from 10-day laboratory bioassays to estimate potential demographic impacts of ENP exposure. We also evaluated fate and transport pathways of the ENPs in the experiments to elucidate routes of uptake and exposure. Dissolved Zn was found in sediment pore water and overlying water samples at 10 fold the concentrations of Cu or Ni, a pattern indicative of the relatively high dissolution rate of ZnO ENPs compared with CuO and NiO ENPs. Accumulation of metals in amphipod tissues increased with exposure concentrations for all three ENPs, suggesting possible exposure pathways to higher taxa. Amphipods accumulated ≤600 μg Zn and Cu g(-1) and 1000 μg Ni g(-1). Amphipod mortality increased with ZnO and CuO concentrations, but showed no significant increase with NiO to concentrations as high as 2000 μg g(-1). The median lethal concentration in sediment (LC50) of ZnO was 763 μg g(-1) and 868 μg g(-1) for CuO ENPs. Our results indicate that ZnO and CuO ENPs, but not NiO ENPs, are toxic to L. plumulosus and that ZnO toxicity primarily results from Zn ion exposure while CuO toxicity is due to nanoparticle exposure. SN - 1879-1514 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/24121101/Accumulation_and_toxicity_of_metal_oxide_nanoparticles_in_a_soft_sediment_estuarine_amphipod_ L2 - https://linkinghub.elsevier.com/retrieve/pii/S0166-445X(13)00246-4 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -