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Prebiotic and probiotic supplementation prevents rhinovirus infections in preterm infants: a randomized, placebo-controlled trial.
J Allergy Clin Immunol 2014; 133(2):405-13JA

Abstract

BACKGROUND

Simple and safe strategies for the prevention of viral respiratory tract infections (RTIs) are needed.

OBJECTIVE

We hypothesized that early prebiotic or probiotic supplementation would reduce the risk of virus-associated RTIs during the first year of life in a cohort of preterm infants.

METHODS

In this randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled trial (ClinicalTrials.gov no. NCT00167700), 94 preterm infants (gestational age, ≥32 + 0 and ≤36 + 6 weeks; birth weight, >1500 g) treated at Turku University Hospital, Turku, Finland, were allocated to receive oral prebiotics (galacto-oligosaccharide and polydextrose mixture, 1:1), a probiotic (Lactobacillus rhamnosus GG, ATCC 53103), or placebo (microcrystalline cellulose) between days 3 and 60 of life. The primary outcome was the incidence of clinically defined virus-associated RTI episodes confirmed from nasal swabs by using nucleic acid testing. Secondary outcomes were the severity and duration of RTIs.

RESULTS

A significantly lower incidence of RTIs was detected in infants receiving prebiotics (rate ratio [RR], 0.24; 95% CI, 0.12-0.49; P < .001) or probiotics (RR, 0.50; 95% CI, 0.28-0.90; P = .022) compared with those receiving placebo. Also, the incidence of rhinovirus-induced episodes, which comprised 80% of all RTI episodes, was found to be significantly lower in the prebiotic (RR, 0.31; 95% CI, 0.14-0.66; P = .003) and probiotic (RR, 0.49; 95% CI, 0.24-1.00; P = .051) groups compared with the placebo group. No differences emerged among the study groups in rhinovirus RNA load during infections, duration of rhinovirus RNA shedding, duration or severity of rhinovirus infections, or occurrence of rhinovirus RNA in asymptomatic infants.

CONCLUSIONS

Gut microbiota modification with specific prebiotics and probiotics might offer a novel and cost-effective means to reduce the risk of rhinovirus infections.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Department of Paediatrics and Adolescent Medicine, Turku University Hospital, Turku, Finland. Electronic address: raakel.luoto@utu.fi.Department of Paediatrics and Adolescent Medicine, Turku University Hospital, Turku, Finland.Department of Virology, University of Turku, Turku, Finland.Department of Paediatrics and Adolescent Medicine, Turku University Hospital, Turku, Finland.Functional Foods Forum, University of Turku, Turku, Finland.Department of Paediatrics and Adolescent Medicine, Turku University Hospital, Turku, Finland.

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Randomized Controlled Trial

Language

eng

PubMed ID

24131826

Citation

Luoto, Raakel, et al. "Prebiotic and Probiotic Supplementation Prevents Rhinovirus Infections in Preterm Infants: a Randomized, Placebo-controlled Trial." The Journal of Allergy and Clinical Immunology, vol. 133, no. 2, 2014, pp. 405-13.
Luoto R, Ruuskanen O, Waris M, et al. Prebiotic and probiotic supplementation prevents rhinovirus infections in preterm infants: a randomized, placebo-controlled trial. J Allergy Clin Immunol. 2014;133(2):405-13.
Luoto, R., Ruuskanen, O., Waris, M., Kalliomäki, M., Salminen, S., & Isolauri, E. (2014). Prebiotic and probiotic supplementation prevents rhinovirus infections in preterm infants: a randomized, placebo-controlled trial. The Journal of Allergy and Clinical Immunology, 133(2), pp. 405-13. doi:10.1016/j.jaci.2013.08.020.
Luoto R, et al. Prebiotic and Probiotic Supplementation Prevents Rhinovirus Infections in Preterm Infants: a Randomized, Placebo-controlled Trial. J Allergy Clin Immunol. 2014;133(2):405-13. PubMed PMID: 24131826.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Prebiotic and probiotic supplementation prevents rhinovirus infections in preterm infants: a randomized, placebo-controlled trial. AU - Luoto,Raakel, AU - Ruuskanen,Olli, AU - Waris,Matti, AU - Kalliomäki,Marko, AU - Salminen,Seppo, AU - Isolauri,Erika, Y1 - 2013/10/13/ PY - 2013/04/20/received PY - 2013/08/15/revised PY - 2013/08/26/accepted PY - 2013/10/18/entrez PY - 2013/10/18/pubmed PY - 2014/5/14/medline KW - Galacto-oligosaccharide KW - Lactobacillus rhamnosus GG KW - RR KW - RSV KW - RTI KW - Rate ratio KW - Respiratory syncytial virus KW - Respiratory tract infection KW - gut microbiota KW - polydextrose KW - prebiotic KW - preterm infant KW - probiotic KW - respiratory tract infections KW - rhinovirus SP - 405 EP - 13 JF - The Journal of allergy and clinical immunology JO - J. Allergy Clin. Immunol. VL - 133 IS - 2 N2 - BACKGROUND: Simple and safe strategies for the prevention of viral respiratory tract infections (RTIs) are needed. OBJECTIVE: We hypothesized that early prebiotic or probiotic supplementation would reduce the risk of virus-associated RTIs during the first year of life in a cohort of preterm infants. METHODS: In this randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled trial (ClinicalTrials.gov no. NCT00167700), 94 preterm infants (gestational age, ≥32 + 0 and ≤36 + 6 weeks; birth weight, >1500 g) treated at Turku University Hospital, Turku, Finland, were allocated to receive oral prebiotics (galacto-oligosaccharide and polydextrose mixture, 1:1), a probiotic (Lactobacillus rhamnosus GG, ATCC 53103), or placebo (microcrystalline cellulose) between days 3 and 60 of life. The primary outcome was the incidence of clinically defined virus-associated RTI episodes confirmed from nasal swabs by using nucleic acid testing. Secondary outcomes were the severity and duration of RTIs. RESULTS: A significantly lower incidence of RTIs was detected in infants receiving prebiotics (rate ratio [RR], 0.24; 95% CI, 0.12-0.49; P < .001) or probiotics (RR, 0.50; 95% CI, 0.28-0.90; P = .022) compared with those receiving placebo. Also, the incidence of rhinovirus-induced episodes, which comprised 80% of all RTI episodes, was found to be significantly lower in the prebiotic (RR, 0.31; 95% CI, 0.14-0.66; P = .003) and probiotic (RR, 0.49; 95% CI, 0.24-1.00; P = .051) groups compared with the placebo group. No differences emerged among the study groups in rhinovirus RNA load during infections, duration of rhinovirus RNA shedding, duration or severity of rhinovirus infections, or occurrence of rhinovirus RNA in asymptomatic infants. CONCLUSIONS: Gut microbiota modification with specific prebiotics and probiotics might offer a novel and cost-effective means to reduce the risk of rhinovirus infections. SN - 1097-6825 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/24131826/Prebiotic_and_probiotic_supplementation_prevents_rhinovirus_infections_in_preterm_infants:_a_randomized_placebo_controlled_trial_ L2 - https://linkinghub.elsevier.com/retrieve/pii/S0091-6749(13)01307-9 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -