Tags

Type your tag names separated by a space and hit enter

Coral energy reserves and calcification in a high-CO2 world at two temperatures.
PLoS One. 2013; 8(10):e75049.Plos

Abstract

Rising atmospheric CO2 concentrations threaten coral reefs globally by causing ocean acidification (OA) and warming. Yet, the combined effects of elevated pCO2 and temperature on coral physiology and resilience remain poorly understood. While coral calcification and energy reserves are important health indicators, no studies to date have measured energy reserve pools (i.e., lipid, protein, and carbohydrate) together with calcification under OA conditions under different temperature scenarios. Four coral species, Acropora millepora, Montipora monasteriata, Pocillopora damicornis, Turbinaria reniformis, were reared under a total of six conditions for 3.5 weeks, representing three pCO2 levels (382, 607, 741 µatm), and two temperature regimes (26.5, 29.0 °C) within each pCO2 level. After one month under experimental conditions, only A. millepora decreased calcification (-53%) in response to seawater pCO2 expected by the end of this century, whereas the other three species maintained calcification rates even when both pCO2 and temperature were elevated. Coral energy reserves showed mixed responses to elevated pCO2 and temperature, and were either unaffected or displayed nonlinear responses with both the lowest and highest concentrations often observed at the mid-pCO2 level of 607 µatm. Biweekly feeding may have helped corals maintain calcification rates and energy reserves under these conditions. Temperature often modulated the response of many aspects of coral physiology to OA, and both mitigated and worsened pCO2 effects. This demonstrates for the first time that coral energy reserves are generally not metabolized to sustain calcification under OA, which has important implications for coral health and bleaching resilience in a high-CO2 world. Overall, these findings suggest that some corals could be more resistant to simultaneously warming and acidifying oceans than previously expected.

Authors+Show Affiliations

School of Earth Sciences, The Ohio State University, Columbus, Ohio, United States of America.No affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't

Language

eng

PubMed ID

24146747

Citation

Schoepf, Verena, et al. "Coral Energy Reserves and Calcification in a high-CO2 World at Two Temperatures." PloS One, vol. 8, no. 10, 2013, pp. e75049.
Schoepf V, Grottoli AG, Warner ME, et al. Coral energy reserves and calcification in a high-CO2 world at two temperatures. PLoS ONE. 2013;8(10):e75049.
Schoepf, V., Grottoli, A. G., Warner, M. E., Cai, W. J., Melman, T. F., Hoadley, K. D., Pettay, D. T., Hu, X., Li, Q., Xu, H., Wang, Y., Matsui, Y., & Baumann, J. H. (2013). Coral energy reserves and calcification in a high-CO2 world at two temperatures. PloS One, 8(10), e75049. https://doi.org/10.1371/journal.pone.0075049
Schoepf V, et al. Coral Energy Reserves and Calcification in a high-CO2 World at Two Temperatures. PLoS ONE. 2013;8(10):e75049. PubMed PMID: 24146747.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Coral energy reserves and calcification in a high-CO2 world at two temperatures. AU - Schoepf,Verena, AU - Grottoli,Andréa G, AU - Warner,Mark E, AU - Cai,Wei-Jun, AU - Melman,Todd F, AU - Hoadley,Kenneth D, AU - Pettay,D Tye, AU - Hu,Xinping, AU - Li,Qian, AU - Xu,Hui, AU - Wang,Yongchen, AU - Matsui,Yohei, AU - Baumann,Justin H, Y1 - 2013/10/11/ PY - 2013/06/02/received PY - 2013/08/08/accepted PY - 2013/10/23/entrez PY - 2013/10/23/pubmed PY - 2014/7/25/medline SP - e75049 EP - e75049 JF - PloS one JO - PLoS ONE VL - 8 IS - 10 N2 - Rising atmospheric CO2 concentrations threaten coral reefs globally by causing ocean acidification (OA) and warming. Yet, the combined effects of elevated pCO2 and temperature on coral physiology and resilience remain poorly understood. While coral calcification and energy reserves are important health indicators, no studies to date have measured energy reserve pools (i.e., lipid, protein, and carbohydrate) together with calcification under OA conditions under different temperature scenarios. Four coral species, Acropora millepora, Montipora monasteriata, Pocillopora damicornis, Turbinaria reniformis, were reared under a total of six conditions for 3.5 weeks, representing three pCO2 levels (382, 607, 741 µatm), and two temperature regimes (26.5, 29.0 °C) within each pCO2 level. After one month under experimental conditions, only A. millepora decreased calcification (-53%) in response to seawater pCO2 expected by the end of this century, whereas the other three species maintained calcification rates even when both pCO2 and temperature were elevated. Coral energy reserves showed mixed responses to elevated pCO2 and temperature, and were either unaffected or displayed nonlinear responses with both the lowest and highest concentrations often observed at the mid-pCO2 level of 607 µatm. Biweekly feeding may have helped corals maintain calcification rates and energy reserves under these conditions. Temperature often modulated the response of many aspects of coral physiology to OA, and both mitigated and worsened pCO2 effects. This demonstrates for the first time that coral energy reserves are generally not metabolized to sustain calcification under OA, which has important implications for coral health and bleaching resilience in a high-CO2 world. Overall, these findings suggest that some corals could be more resistant to simultaneously warming and acidifying oceans than previously expected. SN - 1932-6203 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/24146747/Coral_energy_reserves_and_calcification_in_a_high_CO2_world_at_two_temperatures_ L2 - http://dx.plos.org/10.1371/journal.pone.0075049 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -