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Vestibular functioning and migraine: comparing those with and without vertigo to a normal population.
J Laryngol Otol. 2013 Dec; 127(12):1169-76.JL

Abstract

OBJECTIVE

This study compared vestibular functioning in a migrainous vertigo group, a migraine without vertigo group and a control group. It was hypothesised that the migrainous vertigo group would perform worse in tests of vestibular function and gait than the other groups during a non-migrainous period.

METHODS

Sixty-six participants (22 per group) were assessed using the head shake sensory organisation test, the gaze stabilisation test, the dynamic visual acuity test and the functional gait assessment. Separate analyses of variance and planned pair-wise comparisons (alpha = 0.05) were performed.

RESULTS

There was a difference between the results of the non-migraine group and the two migraine groups for the gaze stabilisation pitch test (p < 0.003), in which the control group showed faster head movement. There were also group differences in functional gait (p < 0.0001); the control group scored highest and the migrainous vertigo group scored lowest. There were no differences in the vestibular spinal reflex and balance tests.

CONCLUSION

These findings indicate underlying differences in the vestibular ocular reflexes and function of migraine sufferers compared with those who do not suffer migraines, but the difference is most pronounced for those with migrainous vertigo. This suggests that vestibular rehabilitation for migrainous vertigo should focus on vestibular ocular reflexes and functional retraining.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Physical Therapy Department, Grand Valley State University, Grand Rapids, Michigan, USA.Interdisciplinary Health Sciences Department, Western Michigan University, Kalamazoo, USA.Physical Therapy Department, California State University, Fresno, USA.Physician Assistants Department, Western Michigan University, Kalamazoo, USA.

Pub Type(s)

Comparative Study
Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't

Language

eng

PubMed ID

24148215

Citation

Baker, B J., et al. "Vestibular Functioning and Migraine: Comparing Those With and Without Vertigo to a Normal Population." The Journal of Laryngology and Otology, vol. 127, no. 12, 2013, pp. 1169-76.
Baker BJ, Curtis A, Trueblood P, et al. Vestibular functioning and migraine: comparing those with and without vertigo to a normal population. J Laryngol Otol. 2013;127(12):1169-76.
Baker, B. J., Curtis, A., Trueblood, P., & Vangsnes, E. (2013). Vestibular functioning and migraine: comparing those with and without vertigo to a normal population. The Journal of Laryngology and Otology, 127(12), 1169-76. https://doi.org/10.1017/S0022215113002302
Baker BJ, et al. Vestibular Functioning and Migraine: Comparing Those With and Without Vertigo to a Normal Population. J Laryngol Otol. 2013;127(12):1169-76. PubMed PMID: 24148215.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Vestibular functioning and migraine: comparing those with and without vertigo to a normal population. AU - Baker,B J, AU - Curtis,A, AU - Trueblood,P, AU - Vangsnes,E, Y1 - 2013/10/22/ PY - 2013/10/24/entrez PY - 2013/10/24/pubmed PY - 2014/9/10/medline SP - 1169 EP - 76 JF - The Journal of laryngology and otology JO - J Laryngol Otol VL - 127 IS - 12 N2 - OBJECTIVE: This study compared vestibular functioning in a migrainous vertigo group, a migraine without vertigo group and a control group. It was hypothesised that the migrainous vertigo group would perform worse in tests of vestibular function and gait than the other groups during a non-migrainous period. METHODS: Sixty-six participants (22 per group) were assessed using the head shake sensory organisation test, the gaze stabilisation test, the dynamic visual acuity test and the functional gait assessment. Separate analyses of variance and planned pair-wise comparisons (alpha = 0.05) were performed. RESULTS: There was a difference between the results of the non-migraine group and the two migraine groups for the gaze stabilisation pitch test (p < 0.003), in which the control group showed faster head movement. There were also group differences in functional gait (p < 0.0001); the control group scored highest and the migrainous vertigo group scored lowest. There were no differences in the vestibular spinal reflex and balance tests. CONCLUSION: These findings indicate underlying differences in the vestibular ocular reflexes and function of migraine sufferers compared with those who do not suffer migraines, but the difference is most pronounced for those with migrainous vertigo. This suggests that vestibular rehabilitation for migrainous vertigo should focus on vestibular ocular reflexes and functional retraining. SN - 1748-5460 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/24148215/Vestibular_functioning_and_migraine:_comparing_those_with_and_without_vertigo_to_a_normal_population_ DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -