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Resistance training for explosive and maximal strength: effects on early and late rate of force development.
J Sports Sci Med. 2013; 12(3):402-8.JS

Abstract

The aim of the present study was to verify whether strength training designed to improve explosive and maximal strength would influence rate of force development (RFD). Nine men participated in a 6-week knee extensors resistance training program and 9 matched subjects participated as controls. Throughout the training sessions, subjects were instructed to perform isometric knee extension as fast and forcefully as possible, achieving at least 90% maximal voluntary contraction as quickly as possible, hold it for 5 s, and relax. Fifteen seconds separated each repetition (6-10), and 2 min separated each set (3). Pre- and post-training measurements were maximal isometric knee extensor (MVC), RFD, and RFD relative to MVC (i.e., %MVC·s(-1)) in different time-epochs varying from 10 to 250 ms from the contraction onset. The MVC (Nm) increased by 19% (275.8 ± 64.9 vs. 329.8 ± 60.4, p < 0.001) after training. In addition, RFD (Nm·s(-1)) increased by 22-28% at time epochs up to 20 ms from the contraction onset (0-10 ms = 1679. 1 ± 597.1 vs. 2159.2 ± 475.2, p < 0.001; 0-20 ms = 1958.79 ± 640.3 vs. 2398.4 ± 479.6, p < 0. 01), with no changes verified in later time epochs. However, no training effects on RFD were found for the training group when RFD was normalized to MVC. No changes were found in the control group. In conclusion, very early and late RFD responded differently to a short period of resistance training for explosive and maximal strength. This time-specific RFD adaptation highlight that resistance training programs should consider the specific neuromuscular demands of each sport. Key PointsThe time-specific RFD adaptation evoked by resistance training highlight that the method of analyzing RFD is essential for the interpretation of results.Confirming previous data, maximal contractile RFD and maximal force can be differently influenced by resistance training. Thus, the resistance training programs should consider the specific neuromuscular demands of each sport.In active non-strength trained individuals, a short-term resistance training program designed to increase both explosive and maximal strength seems to reduce the adaptive response (i.e. increased RFDMAX) evoked by training with an intended ballistic effort (i.e. high-RFD contraction).

Authors+Show Affiliations

Human Performance Laboratory, UNESP , Rio Claro, Brazil.No affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article

Language

eng

PubMed ID

24149144

Citation

Oliveira, Felipe B D., et al. "Resistance Training for Explosive and Maximal Strength: Effects On Early and Late Rate of Force Development." Journal of Sports Science & Medicine, vol. 12, no. 3, 2013, pp. 402-8.
Oliveira FB, Oliveira AS, Rizatto GF, et al. Resistance training for explosive and maximal strength: effects on early and late rate of force development. J Sports Sci Med. 2013;12(3):402-8.
Oliveira, F. B., Oliveira, A. S., Rizatto, G. F., & Denadai, B. S. (2013). Resistance training for explosive and maximal strength: effects on early and late rate of force development. Journal of Sports Science & Medicine, 12(3), 402-8.
Oliveira FB, et al. Resistance Training for Explosive and Maximal Strength: Effects On Early and Late Rate of Force Development. J Sports Sci Med. 2013;12(3):402-8. PubMed PMID: 24149144.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Resistance training for explosive and maximal strength: effects on early and late rate of force development. AU - Oliveira,Felipe B D, AU - Oliveira,Anderson S C, AU - Rizatto,Guilherme F, AU - Denadai,Benedito S, Y1 - 2013/09/01/ PY - 2013/01/16/received PY - 2013/03/26/accepted PY - 2013/10/24/entrez PY - 2013/10/24/pubmed PY - 2013/10/24/medline KW - Quadriceps KW - muscle adaptation KW - muscle strength KW - peak torque KW - power SP - 402 EP - 8 JF - Journal of sports science & medicine JO - J Sports Sci Med VL - 12 IS - 3 N2 - The aim of the present study was to verify whether strength training designed to improve explosive and maximal strength would influence rate of force development (RFD). Nine men participated in a 6-week knee extensors resistance training program and 9 matched subjects participated as controls. Throughout the training sessions, subjects were instructed to perform isometric knee extension as fast and forcefully as possible, achieving at least 90% maximal voluntary contraction as quickly as possible, hold it for 5 s, and relax. Fifteen seconds separated each repetition (6-10), and 2 min separated each set (3). Pre- and post-training measurements were maximal isometric knee extensor (MVC), RFD, and RFD relative to MVC (i.e., %MVC·s(-1)) in different time-epochs varying from 10 to 250 ms from the contraction onset. The MVC (Nm) increased by 19% (275.8 ± 64.9 vs. 329.8 ± 60.4, p < 0.001) after training. In addition, RFD (Nm·s(-1)) increased by 22-28% at time epochs up to 20 ms from the contraction onset (0-10 ms = 1679. 1 ± 597.1 vs. 2159.2 ± 475.2, p < 0.001; 0-20 ms = 1958.79 ± 640.3 vs. 2398.4 ± 479.6, p < 0. 01), with no changes verified in later time epochs. However, no training effects on RFD were found for the training group when RFD was normalized to MVC. No changes were found in the control group. In conclusion, very early and late RFD responded differently to a short period of resistance training for explosive and maximal strength. This time-specific RFD adaptation highlight that resistance training programs should consider the specific neuromuscular demands of each sport. Key PointsThe time-specific RFD adaptation evoked by resistance training highlight that the method of analyzing RFD is essential for the interpretation of results.Confirming previous data, maximal contractile RFD and maximal force can be differently influenced by resistance training. Thus, the resistance training programs should consider the specific neuromuscular demands of each sport.In active non-strength trained individuals, a short-term resistance training program designed to increase both explosive and maximal strength seems to reduce the adaptive response (i.e. increased RFDMAX) evoked by training with an intended ballistic effort (i.e. high-RFD contraction). SN - 1303-2968 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/24149144/Resistance_training_for_explosive_and_maximal_strength:_effects_on_early_and_late_rate_of_force_development_ L2 - https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/pmid/24149144/ DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -
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