Tags

Type your tag names separated by a space and hit enter

Metabolic syndrome and C-reactive protein concentration as independent correlates of chronic kidney disease.
Endocr Res. 2014; 39(3):94-8.ER

Abstract

Inflammation is a common phenotype for cardiometabolic disorders. In this study, we attempted to investigate inter-relationships between metabolic syndrome (MetS), C-reactive protein (an inflammatory biomarker) and chronic kidney disease (CKD). We performed a cross-sectional analysis of data from a representative sample of 4425 Chinese adults in Taiwan. The MetS was defined by a unified criteria set by several major organizations. A CKD event was defined as an estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR) <60 mL/min per 1.73 m(2). Additionly, a CRP cutpoint of 3 mg/L was used to differentiate high and low CRP levels. Overall, 1000 participants had MetS, resulting in a prevalence rate of 22.6%. High CRP level was noted in 782 (17.6%) subjects. In addition, a total of 508 (11.5%) persons qualified as having CKD. Subjects with the MetS had 1.55-fold [95% confidence interval (CI), 1.03-2.32] increased odds of CKD compared with their counterparts without the MetS after multiple adjustments. In addition, there was a significantly graded relationship between increasing levels of serum CRP and prevalent CKD (p for trend = 0.001). Participants in the highest category of serum CRP had a significantly elevated odds of CKD as compared with those in the lowest category [odds ratio (OR), 1.60; 95% CI, 1.21-2.12]. However, there was no interaction in excess of additive scale between the presence of MetS and high CRP level (p = 0.83). These findings suggest that MetS and high CRP were independently associated with increased prevalence of CKD in Chinese adults.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Department of Health Business Administration, Meiho University , Pingtung County , Taiwan .No affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't

Language

eng

PubMed ID

24152229

Citation

Yang, Tsan, et al. "Metabolic Syndrome and C-reactive Protein Concentration as Independent Correlates of Chronic Kidney Disease." Endocrine Research, vol. 39, no. 3, 2014, pp. 94-8.
Yang T, Chou YC, Chu CH, et al. Metabolic syndrome and C-reactive protein concentration as independent correlates of chronic kidney disease. Endocr Res. 2014;39(3):94-8.
Yang, T., Chou, Y. C., Chu, C. H., Lin, S. H., Hsieh, P. C., Hsu, C. H., Bai, C. H., You, S. L., & Sun, C. A. (2014). Metabolic syndrome and C-reactive protein concentration as independent correlates of chronic kidney disease. Endocrine Research, 39(3), 94-8. https://doi.org/10.3109/07435800.2013.840652
Yang T, et al. Metabolic Syndrome and C-reactive Protein Concentration as Independent Correlates of Chronic Kidney Disease. Endocr Res. 2014;39(3):94-8. PubMed PMID: 24152229.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Metabolic syndrome and C-reactive protein concentration as independent correlates of chronic kidney disease. AU - Yang,Tsan, AU - Chou,Yu-Ching, AU - Chu,Chi-Hong, AU - Lin,Shih-Hua, AU - Hsieh,Po-Chien, AU - Hsu,Chih-Hsung, AU - Bai,Chyi-Huey, AU - You,San-Lin, AU - Sun,Chien-An, Y1 - 2013/10/23/ PY - 2013/10/25/entrez PY - 2013/10/25/pubmed PY - 2015/1/21/medline KW - C-reactive protein KW - Chronic kidney disease KW - inflammation KW - metabolic syndrome SP - 94 EP - 8 JF - Endocrine research JO - Endocr Res VL - 39 IS - 3 N2 - Inflammation is a common phenotype for cardiometabolic disorders. In this study, we attempted to investigate inter-relationships between metabolic syndrome (MetS), C-reactive protein (an inflammatory biomarker) and chronic kidney disease (CKD). We performed a cross-sectional analysis of data from a representative sample of 4425 Chinese adults in Taiwan. The MetS was defined by a unified criteria set by several major organizations. A CKD event was defined as an estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR) <60 mL/min per 1.73 m(2). Additionly, a CRP cutpoint of 3 mg/L was used to differentiate high and low CRP levels. Overall, 1000 participants had MetS, resulting in a prevalence rate of 22.6%. High CRP level was noted in 782 (17.6%) subjects. In addition, a total of 508 (11.5%) persons qualified as having CKD. Subjects with the MetS had 1.55-fold [95% confidence interval (CI), 1.03-2.32] increased odds of CKD compared with their counterparts without the MetS after multiple adjustments. In addition, there was a significantly graded relationship between increasing levels of serum CRP and prevalent CKD (p for trend = 0.001). Participants in the highest category of serum CRP had a significantly elevated odds of CKD as compared with those in the lowest category [odds ratio (OR), 1.60; 95% CI, 1.21-2.12]. However, there was no interaction in excess of additive scale between the presence of MetS and high CRP level (p = 0.83). These findings suggest that MetS and high CRP were independently associated with increased prevalence of CKD in Chinese adults. SN - 1532-4206 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/24152229/Metabolic_syndrome_and_C_reactive_protein_concentration_as_independent_correlates_of_chronic_kidney_disease_ L2 - https://www.tandfonline.com/doi/full/10.3109/07435800.2013.840652 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -