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Genetics of seedling and adult plant resistance to net blotch (Pyrenophora teres f. teres) and spot blotch (Cochliobolus sativus) in barley.
Theor Appl Genet. 1996 Apr; 92(5):552-8.TA

Abstract

Net blotch (caused by Pyrenophora teres f. teres) and spot blotch (Cochliobolus sativus) are important foliar diseases of barley in the midwestern region of the USA. To determine the number and chromosomal location of Mendelian and quantitative trait loci (QTL) controlling resistance to these diseases, a doubled haploid population ('Steptoe'/'Morex') was evaluated to the pathogens at the seedling stage in the greenhouse and at the adult plant stage in the field. Alleles at two or three unlinked loci were found to confer resistance to the net blotch pathogen at the seedling stage depending on how progeny exhibiting an intermediate infection response were classified. This result was corroborated in the quantitative analysis of the raw infection response data as 2 major QTL were identified on chromosomes 4 and 6M. A third QTL was also identified on chromosome 6P. Seven QTL were identified for net blotch resistance at the adult plant stage and mapped to chromosomes 1P, 2P, 3P, 3M, 4, 6P, and 7P. The 7 QTL collectively accounted for 67.6% of the phenotypic variance under a multiple QTL model. Resistance to the spot blotch pathogen was conferred by a single gene at the seedling stage. This gene was mapped to the distal region of chromosome 1P on the basis of both qualitative and quantitative data analyses. Two QTL were identified for spot blotch resistance at the adult plant stage: the largest QTL effect mapped to chromosome 5P and the other mapped to chromosome 1P near the seedling resistance locus. Together, the 2 QTL explained 70.1% of the phenotypic variance under a multiple QTL model. On the basis of the chromosomal locations of resistance alleles detected in this study, it should be feasible to combine high levels of resistance to both P. teres f. teres and C. sativus in barley cultivars.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Department of Plant Pathology, North Dakota State University, 58105, Fargo, ND, USA.No affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article

Language

eng

PubMed ID

24166322

Citation

Steffenson, B J., et al. "Genetics of Seedling and Adult Plant Resistance to Net Blotch (Pyrenophora Teres F. Teres) and Spot Blotch (Cochliobolus Sativus) in Barley." TAG. Theoretical and Applied Genetics. Theoretische Und Angewandte Genetik, vol. 92, no. 5, 1996, pp. 552-8.
Steffenson BJ, Hayes PM, Kleinhofs A. Genetics of seedling and adult plant resistance to net blotch (Pyrenophora teres f. teres) and spot blotch (Cochliobolus sativus) in barley. Theor Appl Genet. 1996;92(5):552-8.
Steffenson, B. J., Hayes, P. M., & Kleinhofs, A. (1996). Genetics of seedling and adult plant resistance to net blotch (Pyrenophora teres f. teres) and spot blotch (Cochliobolus sativus) in barley. TAG. Theoretical and Applied Genetics. Theoretische Und Angewandte Genetik, 92(5), 552-8. https://doi.org/10.1007/BF00224557
Steffenson BJ, Hayes PM, Kleinhofs A. Genetics of Seedling and Adult Plant Resistance to Net Blotch (Pyrenophora Teres F. Teres) and Spot Blotch (Cochliobolus Sativus) in Barley. Theor Appl Genet. 1996;92(5):552-8. PubMed PMID: 24166322.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Genetics of seedling and adult plant resistance to net blotch (Pyrenophora teres f. teres) and spot blotch (Cochliobolus sativus) in barley. AU - Steffenson,B J, AU - Hayes,P M, AU - Kleinhofs,A, PY - 1995/05/18/received PY - 1995/09/22/accepted PY - 2013/10/30/entrez PY - 1996/4/1/pubmed PY - 1996/4/1/medline SP - 552 EP - 8 JF - TAG. Theoretical and applied genetics. Theoretische und angewandte Genetik JO - Theor Appl Genet VL - 92 IS - 5 N2 - Net blotch (caused by Pyrenophora teres f. teres) and spot blotch (Cochliobolus sativus) are important foliar diseases of barley in the midwestern region of the USA. To determine the number and chromosomal location of Mendelian and quantitative trait loci (QTL) controlling resistance to these diseases, a doubled haploid population ('Steptoe'/'Morex') was evaluated to the pathogens at the seedling stage in the greenhouse and at the adult plant stage in the field. Alleles at two or three unlinked loci were found to confer resistance to the net blotch pathogen at the seedling stage depending on how progeny exhibiting an intermediate infection response were classified. This result was corroborated in the quantitative analysis of the raw infection response data as 2 major QTL were identified on chromosomes 4 and 6M. A third QTL was also identified on chromosome 6P. Seven QTL were identified for net blotch resistance at the adult plant stage and mapped to chromosomes 1P, 2P, 3P, 3M, 4, 6P, and 7P. The 7 QTL collectively accounted for 67.6% of the phenotypic variance under a multiple QTL model. Resistance to the spot blotch pathogen was conferred by a single gene at the seedling stage. This gene was mapped to the distal region of chromosome 1P on the basis of both qualitative and quantitative data analyses. Two QTL were identified for spot blotch resistance at the adult plant stage: the largest QTL effect mapped to chromosome 5P and the other mapped to chromosome 1P near the seedling resistance locus. Together, the 2 QTL explained 70.1% of the phenotypic variance under a multiple QTL model. On the basis of the chromosomal locations of resistance alleles detected in this study, it should be feasible to combine high levels of resistance to both P. teres f. teres and C. sativus in barley cultivars. SN - 0040-5752 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/24166322/Genetics_of_seedling_and_adult_plant_resistance_to_net_blotch__Pyrenophora_teres_f__teres__and_spot_blotch__Cochliobolus_sativus__in_barley_ L2 - https://dx.doi.org/10.1007/BF00224557 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -
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