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The morning morality effect: the influence of time of day on unethical behavior.
Psychol Sci. 2014 Jan; 25(1):95-102.PS

Abstract

Are people more moral in the morning than in the afternoon? We propose that the normal, unremarkable experiences associated with everyday living can deplete one's capacity to resist moral temptations. In a series of four experiments, both undergraduate students and a sample of U.S. adults engaged in less unethical behavior (e.g., less lying and cheating) on tasks performed in the morning than on the same tasks performed in the afternoon. This morning morality effect was mediated by decreases in moral awareness and self-control in the afternoon. Furthermore, the effect of time of day on unethical behavior was found to be stronger for people with a lower propensity to morally disengage. These findings highlight a simple yet pervasive factor (i.e., the time of day) that has important implications for moral behavior.

Authors+Show Affiliations

1Edmond J. Safra Center for Ethics, Harvard University.No affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article

Language

eng

PubMed ID

24166855

Citation

Kouchaki, Maryam, and Isaac H. Smith. "The Morning Morality Effect: the Influence of Time of Day On Unethical Behavior." Psychological Science, vol. 25, no. 1, 2014, pp. 95-102.
Kouchaki M, Smith IH. The morning morality effect: the influence of time of day on unethical behavior. Psychol Sci. 2014;25(1):95-102.
Kouchaki, M., & Smith, I. H. (2014). The morning morality effect: the influence of time of day on unethical behavior. Psychological Science, 25(1), 95-102. https://doi.org/10.1177/0956797613498099
Kouchaki M, Smith IH. The Morning Morality Effect: the Influence of Time of Day On Unethical Behavior. Psychol Sci. 2014;25(1):95-102. PubMed PMID: 24166855.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - The morning morality effect: the influence of time of day on unethical behavior. AU - Kouchaki,Maryam, AU - Smith,Isaac H, Y1 - 2013/10/28/ PY - 2013/10/30/entrez PY - 2013/10/30/pubmed PY - 2015/4/14/medline KW - cheating KW - ego depletion KW - moral disengagement KW - morality KW - self-control KW - time of day SP - 95 EP - 102 JF - Psychological science JO - Psychol Sci VL - 25 IS - 1 N2 - Are people more moral in the morning than in the afternoon? We propose that the normal, unremarkable experiences associated with everyday living can deplete one's capacity to resist moral temptations. In a series of four experiments, both undergraduate students and a sample of U.S. adults engaged in less unethical behavior (e.g., less lying and cheating) on tasks performed in the morning than on the same tasks performed in the afternoon. This morning morality effect was mediated by decreases in moral awareness and self-control in the afternoon. Furthermore, the effect of time of day on unethical behavior was found to be stronger for people with a lower propensity to morally disengage. These findings highlight a simple yet pervasive factor (i.e., the time of day) that has important implications for moral behavior. SN - 1467-9280 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/24166855/The_morning_morality_effect:_the_influence_of_time_of_day_on_unethical_behavior_ L2 - https://journals.sagepub.com/doi/10.1177/0956797613498099?url_ver=Z39.88-2003&rfr_id=ori:rid:crossref.org&rfr_dat=cr_pub=pubmed DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -
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