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Epidemiology of Staphylococcus aureus bacteraemia at a tertiary children's hospital in Cape Town, South Africa.
PLoS One 2013; 8(10):e78396Plos

Abstract

BACKGROUND

Staphylococcus aureus is an important pathogen in paediatric patients with bloodstream infections. The epidemiology of S. aureus bacteraemia, however, has not been well documented in children in South Africa.

METHODS

A retrospective study was conducted at a children's hospital in Cape Town, South Africa, to investigate the epidemiology of S. aureus bacteraemia from 2007-2011. The incidence, clinical presentation, risk factors, management and outcomes of methicillin sensitive S. aureus (MSSA) and methicillin resistant S. aureus (MRSA) bacteraemia were compared.

RESULTS

Over the five year study period, 365 episodes of S. aureus bacteraemia were identified. The annual incidence was 3.28 cases per 1000 hospital admissions. MRSA was responsible for 26% of S. aureus bacteraemia and 72% of nosocomial infections. Only six possible cases of community-acquired MRSA infections were described. MSSA bacteraemia was more likely to present as pulmonary and bone or joint infections, while bacteraemia without a source was the most common presentation with MRSA. Infants, children with malnutrition, and residents of long-term care facilities were at highest risk for MRSA bacteraemia. The overall case fatality rate for S. aureus bacteraemia was 8.8% over five years, with MRSA being the only significant risk factor for mortality.

CONCLUSION

The incidence of S. aureus bacteraemia and MRSA bacteraemia in children has remained stable over the past five years. MRSA is a predominantly nosocomial pathogen in children with S. aureus bacteraemia in Cape Town, South Africa.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Paediatric Infectious Diseases Unit, Red Cross War Memorial Children's Hospital and the School of Child and Adolescent Health, University of Cape Town, Cape Town, South Africa.No affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Clinical Trial
Comparative Study
Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't

Language

eng

PubMed ID

24167621

Citation

Naidoo, Reené, et al. "Epidemiology of Staphylococcus Aureus Bacteraemia at a Tertiary Children's Hospital in Cape Town, South Africa." PloS One, vol. 8, no. 10, 2013, pp. e78396.
Naidoo R, Nuttall J, Whitelaw A, et al. Epidemiology of Staphylococcus aureus bacteraemia at a tertiary children's hospital in Cape Town, South Africa. PLoS ONE. 2013;8(10):e78396.
Naidoo, R., Nuttall, J., Whitelaw, A., & Eley, B. (2013). Epidemiology of Staphylococcus aureus bacteraemia at a tertiary children's hospital in Cape Town, South Africa. PloS One, 8(10), pp. e78396. doi:10.1371/journal.pone.0078396.
Naidoo R, et al. Epidemiology of Staphylococcus Aureus Bacteraemia at a Tertiary Children's Hospital in Cape Town, South Africa. PLoS ONE. 2013;8(10):e78396. PubMed PMID: 24167621.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Epidemiology of Staphylococcus aureus bacteraemia at a tertiary children's hospital in Cape Town, South Africa. AU - Naidoo,Reené, AU - Nuttall,James, AU - Whitelaw,Andrew, AU - Eley,Brian, Y1 - 2013/10/22/ PY - 2013/05/31/received PY - 2013/09/11/accepted PY - 2013/10/30/entrez PY - 2013/10/30/pubmed PY - 2014/5/29/medline SP - e78396 EP - e78396 JF - PloS one JO - PLoS ONE VL - 8 IS - 10 N2 - BACKGROUND: Staphylococcus aureus is an important pathogen in paediatric patients with bloodstream infections. The epidemiology of S. aureus bacteraemia, however, has not been well documented in children in South Africa. METHODS: A retrospective study was conducted at a children's hospital in Cape Town, South Africa, to investigate the epidemiology of S. aureus bacteraemia from 2007-2011. The incidence, clinical presentation, risk factors, management and outcomes of methicillin sensitive S. aureus (MSSA) and methicillin resistant S. aureus (MRSA) bacteraemia were compared. RESULTS: Over the five year study period, 365 episodes of S. aureus bacteraemia were identified. The annual incidence was 3.28 cases per 1000 hospital admissions. MRSA was responsible for 26% of S. aureus bacteraemia and 72% of nosocomial infections. Only six possible cases of community-acquired MRSA infections were described. MSSA bacteraemia was more likely to present as pulmonary and bone or joint infections, while bacteraemia without a source was the most common presentation with MRSA. Infants, children with malnutrition, and residents of long-term care facilities were at highest risk for MRSA bacteraemia. The overall case fatality rate for S. aureus bacteraemia was 8.8% over five years, with MRSA being the only significant risk factor for mortality. CONCLUSION: The incidence of S. aureus bacteraemia and MRSA bacteraemia in children has remained stable over the past five years. MRSA is a predominantly nosocomial pathogen in children with S. aureus bacteraemia in Cape Town, South Africa. SN - 1932-6203 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/24167621/Epidemiology_of_Staphylococcus_aureus_bacteraemia_at_a_tertiary_children's_hospital_in_Cape_Town_South_Africa_ L2 - http://dx.plos.org/10.1371/journal.pone.0078396 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -