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Developmental differences in EEG and sleep responses to acute ethanol administration and its withdrawal (hangover) in adolescent and adult Wistar rats.
Alcohol 2013; 47(8):601-10A

Abstract

Age-related differences in sensitivity to the acute effects of alcohol may play an important role in the increased risk for the development of alcoholism seen in teens that begin drinking at an early age. The present study evaluated the acute and protracted (hangover) effects of ethanol in adolescent (P33-P40) and adult (P100-P107) Wistar rats, using the cortical electroencephalogram (EEG). Six minutes of EEG was recorded during waking, 15 min after administration of 0, 1.5, or 3.0 g/kg ethanol, and for 3 h at 20 h post ethanol, during the rats' next sleep cycle. Significantly higher overall frontal and parietal cortical power was seen in a wide range of EEG frequencies in adolescent rats as compared to adult rats in their waking EEG. Acute administration of ethanol did not produce differences between adolescents and adults on behavioral measures of acute intoxication. However, it did produce a significantly less intense acute EEG response to ethanol in the theta frequencies in parietal cortex in the adolescents as compared to the adults. At 20 h following acute ethanol administration, during the rats' next sleep cycle, a decrease in slow-wave frequencies (1-4 Hz) was seen and the adolescent rats were found to display more reduction in the slow-wave frequencies than the adults did. The present study found that adolescent rats, as compared to adults, demonstrate low sensitivity to acute ethanol administration in the theta frequencies and more susceptibility to disruption of slow-wave sleep during hangover. These studies may lend support to the idea that these traits may contribute to increased risk for alcohol use disorders seen in adults who begin drinking in their early teenage years.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Molecular and Cellular Neurosciences Department, The Scripps Research Institute, 10550 N. Torrey Pines Rd. SP30-1501, La Jolla, CA 92037, USA. Electronic address: cindye@scripps.edu.No affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Research Support, N.I.H., Extramural

Language

eng

PubMed ID

24169089

Citation

Ehlers, Cindy L., et al. "Developmental Differences in EEG and Sleep Responses to Acute Ethanol Administration and Its Withdrawal (hangover) in Adolescent and Adult Wistar Rats." Alcohol (Fayetteville, N.Y.), vol. 47, no. 8, 2013, pp. 601-10.
Ehlers CL, Desikan A, Wills DN. Developmental differences in EEG and sleep responses to acute ethanol administration and its withdrawal (hangover) in adolescent and adult Wistar rats. Alcohol. 2013;47(8):601-10.
Ehlers, C. L., Desikan, A., & Wills, D. N. (2013). Developmental differences in EEG and sleep responses to acute ethanol administration and its withdrawal (hangover) in adolescent and adult Wistar rats. Alcohol (Fayetteville, N.Y.), 47(8), pp. 601-10. doi:10.1016/j.alcohol.2013.09.040.
Ehlers CL, Desikan A, Wills DN. Developmental Differences in EEG and Sleep Responses to Acute Ethanol Administration and Its Withdrawal (hangover) in Adolescent and Adult Wistar Rats. Alcohol. 2013;47(8):601-10. PubMed PMID: 24169089.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Developmental differences in EEG and sleep responses to acute ethanol administration and its withdrawal (hangover) in adolescent and adult Wistar rats. AU - Ehlers,Cindy L, AU - Desikan,Anita, AU - Wills,Derek N, Y1 - 2013/10/03/ PY - 2013/04/10/received PY - 2013/09/16/revised PY - 2013/09/18/accepted PY - 2013/10/31/entrez PY - 2013/10/31/pubmed PY - 2014/11/13/medline KW - Adolescence KW - Alcohol KW - Alcoholism KW - EEG KW - Hangover KW - Slow-wave sleep SP - 601 EP - 10 JF - Alcohol (Fayetteville, N.Y.) JO - Alcohol VL - 47 IS - 8 N2 - Age-related differences in sensitivity to the acute effects of alcohol may play an important role in the increased risk for the development of alcoholism seen in teens that begin drinking at an early age. The present study evaluated the acute and protracted (hangover) effects of ethanol in adolescent (P33-P40) and adult (P100-P107) Wistar rats, using the cortical electroencephalogram (EEG). Six minutes of EEG was recorded during waking, 15 min after administration of 0, 1.5, or 3.0 g/kg ethanol, and for 3 h at 20 h post ethanol, during the rats' next sleep cycle. Significantly higher overall frontal and parietal cortical power was seen in a wide range of EEG frequencies in adolescent rats as compared to adult rats in their waking EEG. Acute administration of ethanol did not produce differences between adolescents and adults on behavioral measures of acute intoxication. However, it did produce a significantly less intense acute EEG response to ethanol in the theta frequencies in parietal cortex in the adolescents as compared to the adults. At 20 h following acute ethanol administration, during the rats' next sleep cycle, a decrease in slow-wave frequencies (1-4 Hz) was seen and the adolescent rats were found to display more reduction in the slow-wave frequencies than the adults did. The present study found that adolescent rats, as compared to adults, demonstrate low sensitivity to acute ethanol administration in the theta frequencies and more susceptibility to disruption of slow-wave sleep during hangover. These studies may lend support to the idea that these traits may contribute to increased risk for alcohol use disorders seen in adults who begin drinking in their early teenage years. SN - 1873-6823 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/24169089/Developmental_differences_in_EEG_and_sleep_responses_to_acute_ethanol_administration_and_its_withdrawal__hangover__in_adolescent_and_adult_Wistar_rats_ L2 - https://linkinghub.elsevier.com/retrieve/pii/S0741-8329(13)00157-2 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -