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Overweight, obesity and endometrial cancer risk: results from a systematic review and meta-analysis.
Int J Biol Markers 2014; 29(1):e21-9IJ

Abstract

AIM

Findings from recent studies suggest that obesity may be associated with an increased risk of endometrial cancer, but several earlier studies were less conclusive. Here we strive to estimate this relationship in a meta-analysis of published data.

METHODS

We searched Pubmed and Embase for studies on body mass index and the risk of endometrial cancer, published from 1989 to 2011. Data were independently extracted and analyzed using random or fixed effects meta-analysis depending on the degree of heterogeneity.

RESULTS

Seven cohort studies and 11 case-control studies were included in the meta-analysis. Overall, the conditions of excess body weight ([EBW] defined as body mass index [BMI] ≥25 kg/m²), obesity (BMI ≥30 kg/m²) and overweight (25< BMI <30 kg/m²) were associated with an increased risk of endometrial cancer (relative risk [RR] for EBW=1.62, 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.39-1.89; for obesity RR=2.54, 95% CI, 2.11-3.06; for overweight RR=1.32, 95% CI, 1.16-1.50). Subgroup analyses showed that the positive associations were independent of study design, geographic locations, self-reported BMI, alcohol use, smoking habit, history of diabetes, hormone therapy, age at menarche, age at menopause, parity, and age at first full term pregnancy. However, there was no statistically significant association between EBW and endometrial cancer risk for measured BMI (for EBW RR=1.29, 95% CI, 0.66-2.53).

CONCLUSIONS

The findings from this meta-analysis strongly support that the conditions of EBW, overweight, and obesity are all associated with an increased risk of endometrial cancer. Also, the strength of the association increases with increasing BMI.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Department of Cadre Endocrinology, the First Affiliated Hospital, Anhui Traditional Medical University - China.No affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Meta-Analysis
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Systematic Review

Language

eng

PubMed ID

24170556

Citation

Zhang, Yuanyuan, et al. "Overweight, Obesity and Endometrial Cancer Risk: Results From a Systematic Review and Meta-analysis." The International Journal of Biological Markers, vol. 29, no. 1, 2014, pp. e21-9.
Zhang Y, Liu H, Yang S, et al. Overweight, obesity and endometrial cancer risk: results from a systematic review and meta-analysis. Int J Biol Markers. 2014;29(1):e21-9.
Zhang, Y., Liu, H., Yang, S., Zhang, J., Qian, L., & Chen, X. (2014). Overweight, obesity and endometrial cancer risk: results from a systematic review and meta-analysis. The International Journal of Biological Markers, 29(1), pp. e21-9. doi:10.5301/jbm.5000047.
Zhang Y, et al. Overweight, Obesity and Endometrial Cancer Risk: Results From a Systematic Review and Meta-analysis. Int J Biol Markers. 2014 Mar 24;29(1):e21-9. PubMed PMID: 24170556.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Overweight, obesity and endometrial cancer risk: results from a systematic review and meta-analysis. AU - Zhang,Yuanyuan, AU - Liu,Huaizhen, AU - Yang,Shengjie, AU - Zhang,Jinjun, AU - Qian,Liwei, AU - Chen,Xiaowen, Y1 - 2014/03/24/ PY - 2013/09/06/accepted PY - 2013/10/31/entrez PY - 2013/10/31/pubmed PY - 2014/12/15/medline SP - e21 EP - 9 JF - The International journal of biological markers JO - Int. J. Biol. Markers VL - 29 IS - 1 N2 - AIM: Findings from recent studies suggest that obesity may be associated with an increased risk of endometrial cancer, but several earlier studies were less conclusive. Here we strive to estimate this relationship in a meta-analysis of published data. METHODS: We searched Pubmed and Embase for studies on body mass index and the risk of endometrial cancer, published from 1989 to 2011. Data were independently extracted and analyzed using random or fixed effects meta-analysis depending on the degree of heterogeneity. RESULTS: Seven cohort studies and 11 case-control studies were included in the meta-analysis. Overall, the conditions of excess body weight ([EBW] defined as body mass index [BMI] ≥25 kg/m²), obesity (BMI ≥30 kg/m²) and overweight (25< BMI <30 kg/m²) were associated with an increased risk of endometrial cancer (relative risk [RR] for EBW=1.62, 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.39-1.89; for obesity RR=2.54, 95% CI, 2.11-3.06; for overweight RR=1.32, 95% CI, 1.16-1.50). Subgroup analyses showed that the positive associations were independent of study design, geographic locations, self-reported BMI, alcohol use, smoking habit, history of diabetes, hormone therapy, age at menarche, age at menopause, parity, and age at first full term pregnancy. However, there was no statistically significant association between EBW and endometrial cancer risk for measured BMI (for EBW RR=1.29, 95% CI, 0.66-2.53). CONCLUSIONS: The findings from this meta-analysis strongly support that the conditions of EBW, overweight, and obesity are all associated with an increased risk of endometrial cancer. Also, the strength of the association increases with increasing BMI. SN - 1724-6008 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/24170556/Overweight_obesity_and_endometrial_cancer_risk:_results_from_a_systematic_review_and_meta_analysis_ L2 - http://journals.sagepub.com/doi/full/10.5301/jbm.5000047?url_ver=Z39.88-2003&amp;rfr_id=ori:rid:crossref.org&amp;rfr_dat=cr_pub=pubmed DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -