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Body mass index and health-related quality of life among young Swiss men.
BMC Public Health 2013; 13:1028BP

Abstract

BACKGROUND

Studies about the association between body mass index (BMI) and health-related quality of life (HRQOL) are often limited, because they 1) did not include a broad range of health-risk behaviors as covariates; 2) relied on clinical samples, which might lead to biased results; and 3) did not incorporate underweight individuals. Hence, this study aims to examine associations between BMI (from being underweight through obesity) and HRQOL in a population-based sample, while considering multiple health-risk behaviors (low physical activity, risky alcohol consumption, daily cigarette smoking, frequent cannabis use) as well as socio-demographic characteristics.

METHODS

A total of 5 387 young Swiss men (mean age = 19.99; standard deviation = 1.24) of a cross-sectional population-based study were included. BMI was calculated (kg/m²) based on self-reported height and weight and divided into 'underweight' (<18.5), 'normal weight' (18.5-24.9), 'overweight' (25.0-29.9) and 'obese' (≥30.0). Mental and physical HRQOL was assessed via the SF-12v2. Self-reported information on physical activity, substance use (alcohol, cigarettes, and cannabis) and socio-demographic characteristics also was collected. Logistic regression analyses were conducted to study the associations between BMI categories and below average mental or physical HRQOL. Substance use variables and socio-demographic variables were used as covariates.

RESULTS

Altogether, 76.3% were normal weight, whereas 3.3% were underweight, 16.5% overweight and 3.9% obese. Being overweight or obese was associated with reduced physical HRQOL (adjusted OR [95% CI] = 1.58 [1.18-2.13] and 2.45 [1.57-3.83], respectively), whereas being underweight predicted reduced mental HRQOL (adjusted OR [95% CI] = 1.49 [1.08-2.05]). Surprisingly, obesity decreased the likelihood of experiencing below average mental HRQOL (adjusted OR [95% CI] = 0.66 [0.46-0.94]). Besides BMI, expressed as a categorical variable, all health-risk behaviors and socio-demographic variables were associated with reduced physical and/or mental HRQOL.

CONCLUSIONS

Deviations from normal weight are, even after controlling for important health-risk behaviors and socio-demographic characteristics, associated with compromised physical or mental HRQOL among young men. Hence, preventive programs should aim to preserve or re-establish normal weight. The self-appraised positive mental well-being of obese men noted here, which possibly reflects a response shift, might complicate such efforts.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Institute of Social and Preventive Medicine, University of Zurich, Hirschengraben 84, Zurich 8001, Switzerland. michelle.dey@uzh.ch.No affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't

Language

eng

PubMed ID

24172041

Citation

Dey, Michelle, et al. "Body Mass Index and Health-related Quality of Life Among Young Swiss Men." BMC Public Health, vol. 13, 2013, p. 1028.
Dey M, Gmel G, Mohler-Kuo M. Body mass index and health-related quality of life among young Swiss men. BMC Public Health. 2013;13:1028.
Dey, M., Gmel, G., & Mohler-Kuo, M. (2013). Body mass index and health-related quality of life among young Swiss men. BMC Public Health, 13, p. 1028. doi:10.1186/1471-2458-13-1028.
Dey M, Gmel G, Mohler-Kuo M. Body Mass Index and Health-related Quality of Life Among Young Swiss Men. BMC Public Health. 2013 Oct 30;13:1028. PubMed PMID: 24172041.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Body mass index and health-related quality of life among young Swiss men. AU - Dey,Michelle, AU - Gmel,Gerhard, AU - Mohler-Kuo,Meichun, Y1 - 2013/10/30/ PY - 2013/07/08/received PY - 2013/10/28/accepted PY - 2013/11/1/entrez PY - 2013/11/1/pubmed PY - 2014/8/26/medline SP - 1028 EP - 1028 JF - BMC public health JO - BMC Public Health VL - 13 N2 - BACKGROUND: Studies about the association between body mass index (BMI) and health-related quality of life (HRQOL) are often limited, because they 1) did not include a broad range of health-risk behaviors as covariates; 2) relied on clinical samples, which might lead to biased results; and 3) did not incorporate underweight individuals. Hence, this study aims to examine associations between BMI (from being underweight through obesity) and HRQOL in a population-based sample, while considering multiple health-risk behaviors (low physical activity, risky alcohol consumption, daily cigarette smoking, frequent cannabis use) as well as socio-demographic characteristics. METHODS: A total of 5 387 young Swiss men (mean age = 19.99; standard deviation = 1.24) of a cross-sectional population-based study were included. BMI was calculated (kg/m²) based on self-reported height and weight and divided into 'underweight' (<18.5), 'normal weight' (18.5-24.9), 'overweight' (25.0-29.9) and 'obese' (≥30.0). Mental and physical HRQOL was assessed via the SF-12v2. Self-reported information on physical activity, substance use (alcohol, cigarettes, and cannabis) and socio-demographic characteristics also was collected. Logistic regression analyses were conducted to study the associations between BMI categories and below average mental or physical HRQOL. Substance use variables and socio-demographic variables were used as covariates. RESULTS: Altogether, 76.3% were normal weight, whereas 3.3% were underweight, 16.5% overweight and 3.9% obese. Being overweight or obese was associated with reduced physical HRQOL (adjusted OR [95% CI] = 1.58 [1.18-2.13] and 2.45 [1.57-3.83], respectively), whereas being underweight predicted reduced mental HRQOL (adjusted OR [95% CI] = 1.49 [1.08-2.05]). Surprisingly, obesity decreased the likelihood of experiencing below average mental HRQOL (adjusted OR [95% CI] = 0.66 [0.46-0.94]). Besides BMI, expressed as a categorical variable, all health-risk behaviors and socio-demographic variables were associated with reduced physical and/or mental HRQOL. CONCLUSIONS: Deviations from normal weight are, even after controlling for important health-risk behaviors and socio-demographic characteristics, associated with compromised physical or mental HRQOL among young men. Hence, preventive programs should aim to preserve or re-establish normal weight. The self-appraised positive mental well-being of obese men noted here, which possibly reflects a response shift, might complicate such efforts. SN - 1471-2458 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/24172041/Body_mass_index_and_health_related_quality_of_life_among_young_Swiss_men_ L2 - https://bmcpublichealth.biomedcentral.com/articles/10.1186/1471-2458-13-1028 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -