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Are physiological changes experienced by healthy subjects during acu-TENS associated with acupuncture point sensations?
Acupunct Med. 2014 Feb; 32(1):28-36.AM

Abstract

BACKGROUND

Transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation over acupuncture points (acu-TENS) has been reported to improve clinical outcomes. The objectives of the present study were to investigate whether acupuncture point sensations were experienced during acu-TENS, and whether such sensations were associated with any concomitant changes in autonomic nervous system activity.

METHODS

This study adopted a single-blinded, randomised, controlled trial methodology. A total of 36 healthy subjects were randomly assigned to an experimental group (acu-TENS on right LI4 and LI11 points); control group (acu-TENS to bilateral kneecaps); or placebo group (sham acu-TENS on right LI4 and LI11 points). Heart rate (HR), mean arterial blood pressure (MAP), SD of the NN interval (SDNN) and low frequency to high frequency ratio (LF/HF) were measured before, during and after intervention. The Hong Kong Chinese version of the Massachusetts General Hospital Acupuncture Sensation Scale (C-MMASS) index was used for quantifying the acupuncture point stimulation sensations.

RESULTS

The experimental group showed a significant increase in HR (mean (SD) 73.5 (6.3) to 75.9 (6.7) bpm, p=0.027), MAP (88.5 (4.5) to 91.0 (4.1) mm Hg, p=0.004), SDNN (143.36 (8.58) to 153.69 (7.64) ms, p=0.002) and LF/HF (1.26 (0.19) to 1.31 (0.21), p=0.037) during the intervention. The control group showed a significant increase in SDNN (140.21 (8.72) to 143.39 (9.47) ms, p=0.009) and LF/HF (1.21 (0.09) to 1.23 (0.12), p=0.033). There were no significant physiological changes in the placebo group. Overall C-MMASS indices for the experimental, control and placebo groups were 3.23 (0.3), 2.14 (0.6) and 0.29 (0.32), respectively. The between-group difference was statistically significant (F=139.24, df=2, p<0.05). However, correlation analysis did not support any association between sensation intensity and physiological responses in any groups (γ ranged from -0.36 to 0.25).

CONCLUSIONS

This study showed that 'acupuncture point sensations' were experienced during acu-TENS to LI4 and LI11, but such sensations were not associated with physiological responses induced during the stimulation.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Department of Rehabilitation Sciences, The Hong Kong Polytechnic University, , Hong Kong, China.No affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Randomized Controlled Trial

Language

eng

PubMed ID

24185212

Citation

Yu, David T W., and Alice Y M. Jones. "Are Physiological Changes Experienced By Healthy Subjects During acu-TENS Associated With Acupuncture Point Sensations?" Acupuncture in Medicine : Journal of the British Medical Acupuncture Society, vol. 32, no. 1, 2014, pp. 28-36.
Yu DT, Jones AY. Are physiological changes experienced by healthy subjects during acu-TENS associated with acupuncture point sensations? Acupunct Med. 2014;32(1):28-36.
Yu, D. T., & Jones, A. Y. (2014). Are physiological changes experienced by healthy subjects during acu-TENS associated with acupuncture point sensations? Acupuncture in Medicine : Journal of the British Medical Acupuncture Society, 32(1), 28-36. https://doi.org/10.1136/acupmed-2013-010428
Yu DT, Jones AY. Are Physiological Changes Experienced By Healthy Subjects During acu-TENS Associated With Acupuncture Point Sensations. Acupunct Med. 2014;32(1):28-36. PubMed PMID: 24185212.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Are physiological changes experienced by healthy subjects during acu-TENS associated with acupuncture point sensations? AU - Yu,David T W, AU - Jones,Alice Y M, Y1 - 2013/11/01/ PY - 2013/11/5/entrez PY - 2013/11/5/pubmed PY - 2014/9/19/medline KW - PHYSIOTHERAPY SP - 28 EP - 36 JF - Acupuncture in medicine : journal of the British Medical Acupuncture Society JO - Acupunct Med VL - 32 IS - 1 N2 - BACKGROUND: Transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation over acupuncture points (acu-TENS) has been reported to improve clinical outcomes. The objectives of the present study were to investigate whether acupuncture point sensations were experienced during acu-TENS, and whether such sensations were associated with any concomitant changes in autonomic nervous system activity. METHODS: This study adopted a single-blinded, randomised, controlled trial methodology. A total of 36 healthy subjects were randomly assigned to an experimental group (acu-TENS on right LI4 and LI11 points); control group (acu-TENS to bilateral kneecaps); or placebo group (sham acu-TENS on right LI4 and LI11 points). Heart rate (HR), mean arterial blood pressure (MAP), SD of the NN interval (SDNN) and low frequency to high frequency ratio (LF/HF) were measured before, during and after intervention. The Hong Kong Chinese version of the Massachusetts General Hospital Acupuncture Sensation Scale (C-MMASS) index was used for quantifying the acupuncture point stimulation sensations. RESULTS: The experimental group showed a significant increase in HR (mean (SD) 73.5 (6.3) to 75.9 (6.7) bpm, p=0.027), MAP (88.5 (4.5) to 91.0 (4.1) mm Hg, p=0.004), SDNN (143.36 (8.58) to 153.69 (7.64) ms, p=0.002) and LF/HF (1.26 (0.19) to 1.31 (0.21), p=0.037) during the intervention. The control group showed a significant increase in SDNN (140.21 (8.72) to 143.39 (9.47) ms, p=0.009) and LF/HF (1.21 (0.09) to 1.23 (0.12), p=0.033). There were no significant physiological changes in the placebo group. Overall C-MMASS indices for the experimental, control and placebo groups were 3.23 (0.3), 2.14 (0.6) and 0.29 (0.32), respectively. The between-group difference was statistically significant (F=139.24, df=2, p<0.05). However, correlation analysis did not support any association between sensation intensity and physiological responses in any groups (γ ranged from -0.36 to 0.25). CONCLUSIONS: This study showed that 'acupuncture point sensations' were experienced during acu-TENS to LI4 and LI11, but such sensations were not associated with physiological responses induced during the stimulation. SN - 1759-9873 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/24185212/Are_physiological_changes_experienced_by_healthy_subjects_during_acu_TENS_associated_with_acupuncture_point_sensations L2 - https://journals.sagepub.com/doi/10.1136/acupmed-2013-010428?url_ver=Z39.88-2003&amp;rfr_id=ori:rid:crossref.org&amp;rfr_dat=cr_pub=pubmed DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -