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Quality-related enzymes in fruit and vegetable products: effects of novel food processing technologies, part 1: high-pressure processing.
Crit Rev Food Sci Nutr 2014; 54(1):24-63CR

Abstract

The activity of endogenous deteriorative enzymes together with microbial growth (with associated enzymatic activity) and/or other non-enzymatic (usually oxidative) reactions considerably shorten the shelf life of fruits and vegetable products. Thermal processing is commonly used by the food industry for enzyme and microbial inactivation and is generally effective in this regard. However, thermal processing may cause undesirable changes in product's sensory as well as nutritional attributes. Over the last 20 years, there has been a great deal of interest shown by both the food industry and academia in exploring alternative food processing technologies that use minimal heat and/or preservatives. One of the technologies that have been investigated in this context is high-pressure processing (HPP). This review deals with HPP focusing on its effectiveness for controlling quality-degrading enzymes in horticultural products. The scientific literature on the effects of HPP on plant enzymes, mechanism of action, and intrinsic and extrinsic factors that influence the effectiveness of HPP for controlling plant enzymes is critically reviewed. HPP inactivates vegetative microbial cells at ambient temperature conditions, resulting in a very high retention of the nutritional and sensory characteristics of the fresh product. Enzymes such as polyphenol oxidase (PPO), peroxidase (POD), and pectin methylesterase (PME) are highly resistant to HPP and are at most partially inactivated under commercially feasible conditions, although their sensitivity towards pressure depends on their origin as well as their environment. Polygalacturonase (PG) and lipoxygenase (LOX) on the other hand are relatively more pressure sensitive and can be substantially inactivated by HPP at commercially feasible conditions. The retention and activation of enzymes such as PME by HPP can be beneficially used for improving the texture and other quality attributes of processed horticultural products as well as for creating novel structures that are not feasible with thermal processing.

Authors+Show Affiliations

a CSIRO, Animal, Food and Health Sciences , Werribee , Victoria , Australia.No affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Review

Language

eng

PubMed ID

24188232

Citation

Terefe, Netsanet Shiferaw, et al. "Quality-related Enzymes in Fruit and Vegetable Products: Effects of Novel Food Processing Technologies, Part 1: High-pressure Processing." Critical Reviews in Food Science and Nutrition, vol. 54, no. 1, 2014, pp. 24-63.
Terefe NS, Buckow R, Versteeg C. Quality-related enzymes in fruit and vegetable products: effects of novel food processing technologies, part 1: high-pressure processing. Crit Rev Food Sci Nutr. 2014;54(1):24-63.
Terefe, N. S., Buckow, R., & Versteeg, C. (2014). Quality-related enzymes in fruit and vegetable products: effects of novel food processing technologies, part 1: high-pressure processing. Critical Reviews in Food Science and Nutrition, 54(1), pp. 24-63. doi:10.1080/10408398.2011.566946.
Terefe NS, Buckow R, Versteeg C. Quality-related Enzymes in Fruit and Vegetable Products: Effects of Novel Food Processing Technologies, Part 1: High-pressure Processing. Crit Rev Food Sci Nutr. 2014;54(1):24-63. PubMed PMID: 24188232.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Quality-related enzymes in fruit and vegetable products: effects of novel food processing technologies, part 1: high-pressure processing. AU - Terefe,Netsanet Shiferaw, AU - Buckow,Roman, AU - Versteeg,Cornelis, PY - 2013/11/6/entrez PY - 2013/11/6/pubmed PY - 2014/5/13/medline SP - 24 EP - 63 JF - Critical reviews in food science and nutrition JO - Crit Rev Food Sci Nutr VL - 54 IS - 1 N2 - The activity of endogenous deteriorative enzymes together with microbial growth (with associated enzymatic activity) and/or other non-enzymatic (usually oxidative) reactions considerably shorten the shelf life of fruits and vegetable products. Thermal processing is commonly used by the food industry for enzyme and microbial inactivation and is generally effective in this regard. However, thermal processing may cause undesirable changes in product's sensory as well as nutritional attributes. Over the last 20 years, there has been a great deal of interest shown by both the food industry and academia in exploring alternative food processing technologies that use minimal heat and/or preservatives. One of the technologies that have been investigated in this context is high-pressure processing (HPP). This review deals with HPP focusing on its effectiveness for controlling quality-degrading enzymes in horticultural products. The scientific literature on the effects of HPP on plant enzymes, mechanism of action, and intrinsic and extrinsic factors that influence the effectiveness of HPP for controlling plant enzymes is critically reviewed. HPP inactivates vegetative microbial cells at ambient temperature conditions, resulting in a very high retention of the nutritional and sensory characteristics of the fresh product. Enzymes such as polyphenol oxidase (PPO), peroxidase (POD), and pectin methylesterase (PME) are highly resistant to HPP and are at most partially inactivated under commercially feasible conditions, although their sensitivity towards pressure depends on their origin as well as their environment. Polygalacturonase (PG) and lipoxygenase (LOX) on the other hand are relatively more pressure sensitive and can be substantially inactivated by HPP at commercially feasible conditions. The retention and activation of enzymes such as PME by HPP can be beneficially used for improving the texture and other quality attributes of processed horticultural products as well as for creating novel structures that are not feasible with thermal processing. SN - 1549-7852 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/24188232/Quality_related_enzymes_in_fruit_and_vegetable_products:_effects_of_novel_food_processing_technologies_part_1:_high_pressure_processing_ L2 - http://www.tandfonline.com/doi/full/10.1080/10408398.2011.566946 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -