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Fate of ZnO nanoparticles in soils and cowpea (Vigna unguiculata).
Environ Sci Technol. 2013 Dec 03; 47(23):13822-30.ES

Abstract

The increasing use of zinc oxide nanoparticles (ZnO-NPs) in various commercial products is prompting detailed investigation regarding the fate of these materials in the environment. There is, however, a lack of information comparing the transformation of ZnO-NPs with soluble Zn(2+) in both soils and plants. Synchrotron-based techniques were used to examine the uptake and transformation of Zn in various tissues of cowpea (Vigna unguiculata (L.) Walp.) exposed to ZnO-NPs or ZnCl2 following growth in either solution or soil culture. In solution culture, soluble Zn (ZnCl2) was more toxic than the ZnO-NPs, although there was substantial accumulation of ZnO-NPs on the root surface. When grown in soil, however, there was no significant difference in plant growth and accumulation or speciation of Zn between soluble Zn and ZnO-NP treatments, indicating that the added ZnO-NPs underwent rapid dissolution following their entry into the soil. This was confirmed by an incubation experiment with two soils, in which ZnO-NPs could not be detected after incubation for 1 h. The speciation of Zn was similar in shoot tissues for both soluble Zn and ZnO-NPs treatments and no upward translocation of ZnO-NPs from roots to shoots was observed in either solution or soil culture. Under the current experimental conditions, the similarity in uptake and toxicity of Zn from ZnO-NPs and soluble Zn in soils indicates that the ZnO-NPs used in this study did not constitute nanospecific risks.

Authors+Show Affiliations

School of Agriculture and Food Sciences, The University of Queensland , St. Lucia, Queensland 4072, Australia.No affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't

Language

eng

PubMed ID

24195448

Citation

Wang, Peng, et al. "Fate of ZnO Nanoparticles in Soils and Cowpea (Vigna Unguiculata)." Environmental Science & Technology, vol. 47, no. 23, 2013, pp. 13822-30.
Wang P, Menzies NW, Lombi E, et al. Fate of ZnO nanoparticles in soils and cowpea (Vigna unguiculata). Environ Sci Technol. 2013;47(23):13822-30.
Wang, P., Menzies, N. W., Lombi, E., McKenna, B. A., Johannessen, B., Glover, C. J., Kappen, P., & Kopittke, P. M. (2013). Fate of ZnO nanoparticles in soils and cowpea (Vigna unguiculata). Environmental Science & Technology, 47(23), 13822-30. https://doi.org/10.1021/es403466p
Wang P, et al. Fate of ZnO Nanoparticles in Soils and Cowpea (Vigna Unguiculata). Environ Sci Technol. 2013 Dec 3;47(23):13822-30. PubMed PMID: 24195448.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Fate of ZnO nanoparticles in soils and cowpea (Vigna unguiculata). AU - Wang,Peng, AU - Menzies,Neal W, AU - Lombi,Enzo, AU - McKenna,Brigid A, AU - Johannessen,Bernt, AU - Glover,Chris J, AU - Kappen,Peter, AU - Kopittke,Peter M, Y1 - 2013/11/14/ PY - 2013/11/8/entrez PY - 2013/11/8/pubmed PY - 2015/5/15/medline SP - 13822 EP - 30 JF - Environmental science & technology JO - Environ Sci Technol VL - 47 IS - 23 N2 - The increasing use of zinc oxide nanoparticles (ZnO-NPs) in various commercial products is prompting detailed investigation regarding the fate of these materials in the environment. There is, however, a lack of information comparing the transformation of ZnO-NPs with soluble Zn(2+) in both soils and plants. Synchrotron-based techniques were used to examine the uptake and transformation of Zn in various tissues of cowpea (Vigna unguiculata (L.) Walp.) exposed to ZnO-NPs or ZnCl2 following growth in either solution or soil culture. In solution culture, soluble Zn (ZnCl2) was more toxic than the ZnO-NPs, although there was substantial accumulation of ZnO-NPs on the root surface. When grown in soil, however, there was no significant difference in plant growth and accumulation or speciation of Zn between soluble Zn and ZnO-NP treatments, indicating that the added ZnO-NPs underwent rapid dissolution following their entry into the soil. This was confirmed by an incubation experiment with two soils, in which ZnO-NPs could not be detected after incubation for 1 h. The speciation of Zn was similar in shoot tissues for both soluble Zn and ZnO-NPs treatments and no upward translocation of ZnO-NPs from roots to shoots was observed in either solution or soil culture. Under the current experimental conditions, the similarity in uptake and toxicity of Zn from ZnO-NPs and soluble Zn in soils indicates that the ZnO-NPs used in this study did not constitute nanospecific risks. SN - 1520-5851 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/24195448/Fate_of_ZnO_nanoparticles_in_soils_and_cowpea__Vigna_unguiculata__ L2 - https://doi.org/10.1021/es403466p DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -