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Severe eosinophilic meningitis owing to Angiostrongylus cantonensis in young Jamaican children: case report and literature review.
Paediatr Int Child Health. 2014 May; 34(2):148-52.PI

Abstract

Eosinophilic meningitis caused by Angiostrongylus cantonensis is an endemic and emerging disease that affects adults and children in Jamaica. Most cases resolve without sequelae, but young children are at high risk of neurological damage and death. Treatment with corticosteroids and albendazole is considered safe for adults and children, but protocols for its use in children have not been established. A 19-month-old infant with permanent neurological sequlae caused by Angiostrongylus cantonensis meningitis is reported, and five other Jamaican cases are summarized. A review of the literature of children with permanent neurological sequlae and death is presented. Children <5 years (especially <2) were at increased risk of incomplete recovery and death if they presented with bulbar signs, flaccid paresis and coma. None of the severe or fatal cases received early intervention with anthelminthics, and disease progression was not altered with corticosteroids. In view of the pathophysiology, necropsy reports and animal studies, it seems that the early use of larvicidals may change the course of severe presentations.

Authors

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Pub Type(s)

Case Reports
Journal Article
Review

Language

eng

PubMed ID

24199629

Citation

Evans-Gilbert, Tracy, et al. "Severe Eosinophilic Meningitis Owing to Angiostrongylus Cantonensis in Young Jamaican Children: Case Report and Literature Review." Paediatrics and International Child Health, vol. 34, no. 2, 2014, pp. 148-52.
Evans-Gilbert T, Lindo JF, Henry S, et al. Severe eosinophilic meningitis owing to Angiostrongylus cantonensis in young Jamaican children: case report and literature review. Paediatr Int Child Health. 2014;34(2):148-52.
Evans-Gilbert, T., Lindo, J. F., Henry, S., Brown, P., & Christie, C. D. (2014). Severe eosinophilic meningitis owing to Angiostrongylus cantonensis in young Jamaican children: case report and literature review. Paediatrics and International Child Health, 34(2), 148-52. https://doi.org/10.1179/2046905513Y.0000000106
Evans-Gilbert T, et al. Severe Eosinophilic Meningitis Owing to Angiostrongylus Cantonensis in Young Jamaican Children: Case Report and Literature Review. Paediatr Int Child Health. 2014;34(2):148-52. PubMed PMID: 24199629.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Severe eosinophilic meningitis owing to Angiostrongylus cantonensis in young Jamaican children: case report and literature review. AU - Evans-Gilbert,Tracy, AU - Lindo,John F, AU - Henry,Sonia, AU - Brown,Paul, AU - Christie,Celia D C, Y1 - 2013/12/06/ PY - 2013/11/9/entrez PY - 2013/11/10/pubmed PY - 2014/12/20/medline KW - Angiostrongylus cantonensis, KW - Children KW - Eosinophilic, KW - Infectious disease, KW - Meningitis, KW - Severe, SP - 148 EP - 52 JF - Paediatrics and international child health JO - Paediatr Int Child Health VL - 34 IS - 2 N2 - Eosinophilic meningitis caused by Angiostrongylus cantonensis is an endemic and emerging disease that affects adults and children in Jamaica. Most cases resolve without sequelae, but young children are at high risk of neurological damage and death. Treatment with corticosteroids and albendazole is considered safe for adults and children, but protocols for its use in children have not been established. A 19-month-old infant with permanent neurological sequlae caused by Angiostrongylus cantonensis meningitis is reported, and five other Jamaican cases are summarized. A review of the literature of children with permanent neurological sequlae and death is presented. Children <5 years (especially <2) were at increased risk of incomplete recovery and death if they presented with bulbar signs, flaccid paresis and coma. None of the severe or fatal cases received early intervention with anthelminthics, and disease progression was not altered with corticosteroids. In view of the pathophysiology, necropsy reports and animal studies, it seems that the early use of larvicidals may change the course of severe presentations. SN - 2046-9055 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/24199629/Severe_eosinophilic_meningitis_owing_to_Angiostrongylus_cantonensis_in_young_Jamaican_children:_case_report_and_literature_review_ L2 - https://www.tandfonline.com/doi/full/10.1179/2046905513Y.0000000106 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -