Tags

Type your tag names separated by a space and hit enter

Sodium surfeit and potassium deficit: keys to the pathogenesis of hypertension.
J Am Soc Hypertens. 2014 Mar; 8(3):203-13.JA

Abstract

The pathogenic role of Na(+) in primary hypertension is widely recognized but that of K(+) remains unappreciated. Yet, extensive evidence indicates that together, the body's dominant cations constitute the chief environmental factor in the pathogenesis of hypertension and its cardiovascular sequelae. In this Review, we provide a synthesis of the determinants of Na(+) retention and K(+) loss developing in the body as the Na(+)-rich and K(+)-poor modern diet interacts with kidneys intrinsically poised to conserve Na(+) and excrete K(+); and the molecular pathways utilized by these disturbances in the central nervous system and the periphery to increase sympathetic tone and vascular resistance, and establish hypertension. These fresh insights point to new directions for targeted pharmacotherapy of hypertension. The interdependency of Na(+) and K(+) in the pathogenesis of hypertension indicates that Na(+) restriction and increased K(+) intake are important strategies for the primary prevention and treatment of hypertension and its cardiovascular consequences.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Department of Medicine, Baylor College of Medicine, Methodist Hospital, and Renal Section, Veterans Affairs Medical Center, Houston, TX.Department of Medicine, Tufts University School of Medicine and Division of Nephrology, St. Elizabeth's Medical Center, Boston, MA. Electronic address: nicolaos.madias@steward.org.

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Review

Language

eng

PubMed ID

24200471

Citation

Adrogué, Horacio J., and Nicolaos E. Madias. "Sodium Surfeit and Potassium Deficit: Keys to the Pathogenesis of Hypertension." Journal of the American Society of Hypertension : JASH, vol. 8, no. 3, 2014, pp. 203-13.
Adrogué HJ, Madias NE. Sodium surfeit and potassium deficit: keys to the pathogenesis of hypertension. J Am Soc Hypertens. 2014;8(3):203-13.
Adrogué, H. J., & Madias, N. E. (2014). Sodium surfeit and potassium deficit: keys to the pathogenesis of hypertension. Journal of the American Society of Hypertension : JASH, 8(3), 203-13. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.jash.2013.09.003
Adrogué HJ, Madias NE. Sodium Surfeit and Potassium Deficit: Keys to the Pathogenesis of Hypertension. J Am Soc Hypertens. 2014;8(3):203-13. PubMed PMID: 24200471.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Sodium surfeit and potassium deficit: keys to the pathogenesis of hypertension. AU - Adrogué,Horacio J, AU - Madias,Nicolaos E, Y1 - 2013/11/05/ PY - 2013/08/19/received PY - 2013/09/20/revised PY - 2013/09/22/accepted PY - 2013/11/9/entrez PY - 2013/11/10/pubmed PY - 2014/11/5/medline KW - Sodium sensitivity KW - aldosterone KW - angiotensin II KW - calcium signaling KW - endogenous ouabain KW - potassium channels KW - sympathetic activity SP - 203 EP - 13 JF - Journal of the American Society of Hypertension : JASH JO - J Am Soc Hypertens VL - 8 IS - 3 N2 - The pathogenic role of Na(+) in primary hypertension is widely recognized but that of K(+) remains unappreciated. Yet, extensive evidence indicates that together, the body's dominant cations constitute the chief environmental factor in the pathogenesis of hypertension and its cardiovascular sequelae. In this Review, we provide a synthesis of the determinants of Na(+) retention and K(+) loss developing in the body as the Na(+)-rich and K(+)-poor modern diet interacts with kidneys intrinsically poised to conserve Na(+) and excrete K(+); and the molecular pathways utilized by these disturbances in the central nervous system and the periphery to increase sympathetic tone and vascular resistance, and establish hypertension. These fresh insights point to new directions for targeted pharmacotherapy of hypertension. The interdependency of Na(+) and K(+) in the pathogenesis of hypertension indicates that Na(+) restriction and increased K(+) intake are important strategies for the primary prevention and treatment of hypertension and its cardiovascular consequences. SN - 1878-7436 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/24200471/Sodium_surfeit_and_potassium_deficit:_keys_to_the_pathogenesis_of_hypertension_ L2 - https://linkinghub.elsevier.com/retrieve/pii/S1933-1711(13)00169-1 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -