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Statin use and risk of lung cancer: a meta-analysis of observational studies and randomized controlled trials.
PLoS One. 2013; 8(10):e77950.Plos

Abstract

Clinical studies have shown that statin use may alter the risk of lung cancer. However, these studies yielded different results. To quantify the association between statin use and risk of lung cancer, we performed a detailed meta-analysis. A literature search was carried out using MEDLINE, EMBASE and COCHRANE database between January 1966 and November 2012. Before meta-analysis, between-study heterogeneity and publication bias were assessed using adequate statistical tests. Fixed-effect and random-effect models were used to calculate the pooled relative risks (RR) and corresponding 95% confidence intervals (CIs). Subgroup analyses, sensitivity analysis and cumulative meta-analysis were also performed. A total of 20 (five randomized controlled trials, eight cohorts, and seven case-control) studies contributed to the analysis. Pooled results indicated a non-significant decrease of total lung cancer risk among all statin users (RR = 0.89, 95% CI [0.78, 1.02]). Further, long-term statin use did not significantly decrease the risk of total lung cancer (RR = 0.80, 95% CI [0.39 , 1.64]). In our subgroup analyses, the results were not substantially affected by study design, participant ethnicity, or confounder adjustment. Furthermore, sensitivity analysis confirmed the stability of results. The findings of this meta-analysis suggested that there was no significant association between statin use and risk of lung cancer. More studies, especially randomized controlled trials and high quality cohort studies are warranted to confirm this association.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Department of general oncology, Chinese PLA General Hospital, Beijing, People's Republic of China.No affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Meta-Analysis

Language

eng

PubMed ID

24205041

Citation

Wang, Jinliang, et al. "Statin Use and Risk of Lung Cancer: a Meta-analysis of Observational Studies and Randomized Controlled Trials." PloS One, vol. 8, no. 10, 2013, pp. e77950.
Wang J, Li C, Tao H, et al. Statin use and risk of lung cancer: a meta-analysis of observational studies and randomized controlled trials. PLoS ONE. 2013;8(10):e77950.
Wang, J., Li, C., Tao, H., Cheng, Y., Han, L., Li, X., & Hu, Y. (2013). Statin use and risk of lung cancer: a meta-analysis of observational studies and randomized controlled trials. PloS One, 8(10), e77950. https://doi.org/10.1371/journal.pone.0077950
Wang J, et al. Statin Use and Risk of Lung Cancer: a Meta-analysis of Observational Studies and Randomized Controlled Trials. PLoS ONE. 2013;8(10):e77950. PubMed PMID: 24205041.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Statin use and risk of lung cancer: a meta-analysis of observational studies and randomized controlled trials. AU - Wang,Jinliang, AU - Li,Cheng, AU - Tao,Haitao, AU - Cheng,Yao, AU - Han,Lu, AU - Li,Xiaoyan, AU - Hu,Yi, Y1 - 2013/10/25/ PY - 2013/06/03/received PY - 2013/09/06/accepted PY - 2013/11/9/entrez PY - 2013/11/10/pubmed PY - 2014/9/5/medline SP - e77950 EP - e77950 JF - PloS one JO - PLoS ONE VL - 8 IS - 10 N2 - Clinical studies have shown that statin use may alter the risk of lung cancer. However, these studies yielded different results. To quantify the association between statin use and risk of lung cancer, we performed a detailed meta-analysis. A literature search was carried out using MEDLINE, EMBASE and COCHRANE database between January 1966 and November 2012. Before meta-analysis, between-study heterogeneity and publication bias were assessed using adequate statistical tests. Fixed-effect and random-effect models were used to calculate the pooled relative risks (RR) and corresponding 95% confidence intervals (CIs). Subgroup analyses, sensitivity analysis and cumulative meta-analysis were also performed. A total of 20 (five randomized controlled trials, eight cohorts, and seven case-control) studies contributed to the analysis. Pooled results indicated a non-significant decrease of total lung cancer risk among all statin users (RR = 0.89, 95% CI [0.78, 1.02]). Further, long-term statin use did not significantly decrease the risk of total lung cancer (RR = 0.80, 95% CI [0.39 , 1.64]). In our subgroup analyses, the results were not substantially affected by study design, participant ethnicity, or confounder adjustment. Furthermore, sensitivity analysis confirmed the stability of results. The findings of this meta-analysis suggested that there was no significant association between statin use and risk of lung cancer. More studies, especially randomized controlled trials and high quality cohort studies are warranted to confirm this association. SN - 1932-6203 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/24205041/Statin_use_and_risk_of_lung_cancer:_a_meta_analysis_of_observational_studies_and_randomized_controlled_trials_ L2 - http://dx.plos.org/10.1371/journal.pone.0077950 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -