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Can a school-based intervention increase children's fruit and vegetable consumption in the home setting?
Perspect Public Health. 2013 Nov; 133(6):330-6.PP

Abstract

AIMS

Although previous research has shown the Food Dudes programme increases children's fruit and vegetable consumption at school, the evidence for the effectiveness in the home setting is more equivocal. The school environment is identified as a logical setting for targeting children's fruit and vegetable consumption; however, to produce sustainable changes in behaviour, it is equally important that interventions target consumption in the home setting. This study aimed to establish whether the Food Dudes intervention can influence home consumption of fruit and vegetables and the extent to which any changes in eating behaviour following the intervention were maintained in the long term.

METHODS

A total of 34 children aged 4-11 years from eight primary schools (four intervention and four control groups) in the West Midlands, United Kingdom, completed a 7-day photographic food diary at baseline (prior to the intervention), a 3-month follow-up (post-intervention) and a 12-month follow-up.

RESULTS

The Food Dudes programme did not influence either short- or long-term changes in children's consumption of fruit and vegetables at home during weekdays or at the weekend.

CONCLUSIONS

The Food Dudes programme had no effect on changing children's fruit and vegetable consumption in the home environment. Further development of the programme could consider how parental and home environmental factors may be combined with the principles of the Food Dudes programme to influence children's fruit and vegetable consumption in this setting.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Research Assistant, Institute of Health and Society, University of Worcester, Worcester, UK.No affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't

Language

eng

PubMed ID

24215014

Citation

Taylor, Charlotte, et al. "Can a School-based Intervention Increase Children's Fruit and Vegetable Consumption in the Home Setting?" Perspectives in Public Health, vol. 133, no. 6, 2013, pp. 330-6.
Taylor C, Darby H, Upton P, et al. Can a school-based intervention increase children's fruit and vegetable consumption in the home setting? Perspect Public Health. 2013;133(6):330-6.
Taylor, C., Darby, H., Upton, P., & Upton, D. (2013). Can a school-based intervention increase children's fruit and vegetable consumption in the home setting? Perspectives in Public Health, 133(6), 330-6. https://doi.org/10.1177/1757913913506575
Taylor C, et al. Can a School-based Intervention Increase Children's Fruit and Vegetable Consumption in the Home Setting. Perspect Public Health. 2013;133(6):330-6. PubMed PMID: 24215014.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Can a school-based intervention increase children's fruit and vegetable consumption in the home setting? AU - Taylor,Charlotte, AU - Darby,Helena, AU - Upton,Penney, AU - Upton,Dominic, PY - 2013/11/12/entrez PY - 2013/11/12/pubmed PY - 2014/4/4/medline KW - children KW - fruit KW - home environment KW - school-based intervention KW - vegetables SP - 330 EP - 6 JF - Perspectives in public health JO - Perspect Public Health VL - 133 IS - 6 N2 - AIMS: Although previous research has shown the Food Dudes programme increases children's fruit and vegetable consumption at school, the evidence for the effectiveness in the home setting is more equivocal. The school environment is identified as a logical setting for targeting children's fruit and vegetable consumption; however, to produce sustainable changes in behaviour, it is equally important that interventions target consumption in the home setting. This study aimed to establish whether the Food Dudes intervention can influence home consumption of fruit and vegetables and the extent to which any changes in eating behaviour following the intervention were maintained in the long term. METHODS: A total of 34 children aged 4-11 years from eight primary schools (four intervention and four control groups) in the West Midlands, United Kingdom, completed a 7-day photographic food diary at baseline (prior to the intervention), a 3-month follow-up (post-intervention) and a 12-month follow-up. RESULTS: The Food Dudes programme did not influence either short- or long-term changes in children's consumption of fruit and vegetables at home during weekdays or at the weekend. CONCLUSIONS: The Food Dudes programme had no effect on changing children's fruit and vegetable consumption in the home environment. Further development of the programme could consider how parental and home environmental factors may be combined with the principles of the Food Dudes programme to influence children's fruit and vegetable consumption in this setting. SN - 1757-9139 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/24215014/Can_a_school_based_intervention_increase_children's_fruit_and_vegetable_consumption_in_the_home_setting L2 - https://journals.sagepub.com/doi/10.1177/1757913913506575?url_ver=Z39.88-2003&rfr_id=ori:rid:crossref.org&rfr_dat=cr_pub=pubmed DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -