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AOX removal from industrial wastewaters using advanced oxidation processes: assessment of a combined chemical-biological oxidation.
Water Sci Technol. 2013; 68(9):2048-54.WS

Abstract

In this paper, the abatement of adsorbable halogenated organic compounds (AOX) from an industrial wastewater containing relatively high chloride concentrations by a combined chemical and biological oxidation is assessed. For chemical oxidation, the O(3)/UV, H(2)O(2)/UV and photo-Fenton processes are evaluated on pilot scale. Biological oxidation is simulated in a 4 h respirometry experiment with periodic aeration. The results show that a selective degradation of AOX with respect to the matrix compounds (expressed as chemical oxygen demand) could be achieved. For O(3)/UV, lowering the ratio of O(3) dosage to UV intensity leads to a better selectivity for AOX. During O(3)-based experiments, the AOX removal is generally less than during the H(2)O(2)-based experiments. However, after biological oxidation, the AOX levels are comparable. For H(2)O(2)/UV, optimal operating parameters for UV and H(2)O(2) dosage are next determined in a second run with another wastewater sample.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Chemical and Biochemical Process Technology and Control, Katholieke Universiteit Leuven, Department of Chemical Engineering, W. de Croylaan 46, 3001 Heverlee, Belgium; Process and environmental technology, Campus De Nayer, J.P. De Nayerlaan 5, 2860 Sint-Katelijne-Waver, Belgium.No affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Evaluation Study
Journal Article

Language

eng

PubMed ID

24225107

Citation

Luyten, J, et al. "AOX Removal From Industrial Wastewaters Using Advanced Oxidation Processes: Assessment of a Combined Chemical-biological Oxidation." Water Science and Technology : a Journal of the International Association On Water Pollution Research, vol. 68, no. 9, 2013, pp. 2048-54.
Luyten J, Sniegowski K, Van Eyck K, et al. AOX removal from industrial wastewaters using advanced oxidation processes: assessment of a combined chemical-biological oxidation. Water Sci Technol. 2013;68(9):2048-54.
Luyten, J., Sniegowski, K., Van Eyck, K., Maertens, D., Timmermans, S., Liers, S., & Braeken, L. (2013). AOX removal from industrial wastewaters using advanced oxidation processes: assessment of a combined chemical-biological oxidation. Water Science and Technology : a Journal of the International Association On Water Pollution Research, 68(9), 2048-54. https://doi.org/10.2166/wst.2013.459
Luyten J, et al. AOX Removal From Industrial Wastewaters Using Advanced Oxidation Processes: Assessment of a Combined Chemical-biological Oxidation. Water Sci Technol. 2013;68(9):2048-54. PubMed PMID: 24225107.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - AOX removal from industrial wastewaters using advanced oxidation processes: assessment of a combined chemical-biological oxidation. AU - Luyten,J, AU - Sniegowski,K, AU - Van Eyck,K, AU - Maertens,D, AU - Timmermans,S, AU - Liers,Sven, AU - Braeken,L, PY - 2013/11/15/entrez PY - 2013/11/15/pubmed PY - 2014/2/7/medline SP - 2048 EP - 54 JF - Water science and technology : a journal of the International Association on Water Pollution Research JO - Water Sci Technol VL - 68 IS - 9 N2 - In this paper, the abatement of adsorbable halogenated organic compounds (AOX) from an industrial wastewater containing relatively high chloride concentrations by a combined chemical and biological oxidation is assessed. For chemical oxidation, the O(3)/UV, H(2)O(2)/UV and photo-Fenton processes are evaluated on pilot scale. Biological oxidation is simulated in a 4 h respirometry experiment with periodic aeration. The results show that a selective degradation of AOX with respect to the matrix compounds (expressed as chemical oxygen demand) could be achieved. For O(3)/UV, lowering the ratio of O(3) dosage to UV intensity leads to a better selectivity for AOX. During O(3)-based experiments, the AOX removal is generally less than during the H(2)O(2)-based experiments. However, after biological oxidation, the AOX levels are comparable. For H(2)O(2)/UV, optimal operating parameters for UV and H(2)O(2) dosage are next determined in a second run with another wastewater sample. SN - 0273-1223 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/24225107/AOX_removal_from_industrial_wastewaters_using_advanced_oxidation_processes:_assessment_of_a_combined_chemical_biological_oxidation_ L2 - https://iwaponline.com/wst/article-lookup/doi/10.2166/wst.2013.459 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -