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Review article: vitamin D and inflammatory bowel diseases.

Abstract

BACKGROUND

Vitamin D is traditionally associated with bone metabolism. The immunological effects of vitamin D have increasingly come into focus.

AIM

To review the evidence supporting a role of vitamin D in inflammatory bowel diseases.

METHODS

A comprehensive search was performed on PubMed using the terms 'crohn's disease' 'ulcerative colitis' and 'vitamin D'.

RESULTS

Vitamin D deficiency is common in patients with inflammatory bowel diseases (IBD) (16-95%) including those with recently diagnosed disease. Evidence supports immunological role of vitamin D in IBD. In animal models, deficiency of vitamin D increases susceptibility to dextran sodium sulphate colitis, while 1,25(OH)2 D3 ameliorates such colitis. One prospective cohort study found low predicted vitamin D levels to be associated with an increased risk of Crohn's disease (CD). Limited data also suggest an association between low vitamin D levels and increased disease activity, particularly in CD. In a large cohort, vitamin D deficiency (<20 ng/mL) was associated with increased risk of surgery (OR 1.8, 95% CI 1.2-2.5) in CD and hospitalisations in both CD (OR 2.1, 95% CI 1.6-2.7) and UC (OR 2.3, 95% CI 1.7-3.1). A single randomised controlled trial demonstrated that vitamin D supplementation may be associated with reduced frequency of relapses in patients with CD compared with placebo (13% vs. 29%, P = 0.06).

CONCLUSIONS

There is growing epidemiological evidence to suggest a role for vitamin D deficiency in the development of IBD and also its influence on disease severity. The possible therapeutic role of vitamin D in patients with IBD merits continued investigation.

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  • Authors+Show Affiliations

    ,

    Department of Gastroenterology, All India Institute of Medical Sciences, New Delhi, India.

    Source

    MeSH

    Animals
    Colitis, Ulcerative
    Crohn Disease
    Humans
    Vitamin D
    Vitamin D Deficiency

    Pub Type(s)

    Journal Article
    Research Support, N.I.H., Extramural
    Review

    Language

    eng

    PubMed ID

    24236989

    Citation

    Mouli, V P., and A N. Ananthakrishnan. "Review Article: Vitamin D and Inflammatory Bowel Diseases." Alimentary Pharmacology & Therapeutics, vol. 39, no. 2, 2014, pp. 125-36.
    Mouli VP, Ananthakrishnan AN. Review article: vitamin D and inflammatory bowel diseases. Aliment Pharmacol Ther. 2014;39(2):125-36.
    Mouli, V. P., & Ananthakrishnan, A. N. (2014). Review article: vitamin D and inflammatory bowel diseases. Alimentary Pharmacology & Therapeutics, 39(2), pp. 125-36. doi:10.1111/apt.12553.
    Mouli VP, Ananthakrishnan AN. Review Article: Vitamin D and Inflammatory Bowel Diseases. Aliment Pharmacol Ther. 2014;39(2):125-36. PubMed PMID: 24236989.
    * Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
    TY - JOUR T1 - Review article: vitamin D and inflammatory bowel diseases. AU - Mouli,V P, AU - Ananthakrishnan,A N, Y1 - 2013/11/17/ PY - 2013/09/27/received PY - 2013/10/15/revised PY - 2013/10/26/revised PY - 2013/10/28/accepted PY - 2013/11/19/entrez PY - 2013/11/19/pubmed PY - 2014/10/8/medline SP - 125 EP - 36 JF - Alimentary pharmacology & therapeutics JO - Aliment. Pharmacol. Ther. VL - 39 IS - 2 N2 - BACKGROUND: Vitamin D is traditionally associated with bone metabolism. The immunological effects of vitamin D have increasingly come into focus. AIM: To review the evidence supporting a role of vitamin D in inflammatory bowel diseases. METHODS: A comprehensive search was performed on PubMed using the terms 'crohn's disease' 'ulcerative colitis' and 'vitamin D'. RESULTS: Vitamin D deficiency is common in patients with inflammatory bowel diseases (IBD) (16-95%) including those with recently diagnosed disease. Evidence supports immunological role of vitamin D in IBD. In animal models, deficiency of vitamin D increases susceptibility to dextran sodium sulphate colitis, while 1,25(OH)2 D3 ameliorates such colitis. One prospective cohort study found low predicted vitamin D levels to be associated with an increased risk of Crohn's disease (CD). Limited data also suggest an association between low vitamin D levels and increased disease activity, particularly in CD. In a large cohort, vitamin D deficiency (<20 ng/mL) was associated with increased risk of surgery (OR 1.8, 95% CI 1.2-2.5) in CD and hospitalisations in both CD (OR 2.1, 95% CI 1.6-2.7) and UC (OR 2.3, 95% CI 1.7-3.1). A single randomised controlled trial demonstrated that vitamin D supplementation may be associated with reduced frequency of relapses in patients with CD compared with placebo (13% vs. 29%, P = 0.06). CONCLUSIONS: There is growing epidemiological evidence to suggest a role for vitamin D deficiency in the development of IBD and also its influence on disease severity. The possible therapeutic role of vitamin D in patients with IBD merits continued investigation. SN - 1365-2036 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/24236989/Review_article:_vitamin_D_and_inflammatory_bowel_diseases_ L2 - https://doi.org/10.1111/apt.12553 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -