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Review article: vitamin D and inflammatory bowel diseases.
Aliment Pharmacol Ther 2014; 39(2):125-36AP

Abstract

BACKGROUND

Vitamin D is traditionally associated with bone metabolism. The immunological effects of vitamin D have increasingly come into focus.

AIM

To review the evidence supporting a role of vitamin D in inflammatory bowel diseases.

METHODS

A comprehensive search was performed on PubMed using the terms 'crohn's disease' 'ulcerative colitis' and 'vitamin D'.

RESULTS

Vitamin D deficiency is common in patients with inflammatory bowel diseases (IBD) (16-95%) including those with recently diagnosed disease. Evidence supports immunological role of vitamin D in IBD. In animal models, deficiency of vitamin D increases susceptibility to dextran sodium sulphate colitis, while 1,25(OH)2 D3 ameliorates such colitis. One prospective cohort study found low predicted vitamin D levels to be associated with an increased risk of Crohn's disease (CD). Limited data also suggest an association between low vitamin D levels and increased disease activity, particularly in CD. In a large cohort, vitamin D deficiency (<20 ng/mL) was associated with increased risk of surgery (OR 1.8, 95% CI 1.2-2.5) in CD and hospitalisations in both CD (OR 2.1, 95% CI 1.6-2.7) and UC (OR 2.3, 95% CI 1.7-3.1). A single randomised controlled trial demonstrated that vitamin D supplementation may be associated with reduced frequency of relapses in patients with CD compared with placebo (13% vs. 29%, P = 0.06).

CONCLUSIONS

There is growing epidemiological evidence to suggest a role for vitamin D deficiency in the development of IBD and also its influence on disease severity. The possible therapeutic role of vitamin D in patients with IBD merits continued investigation.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Department of Gastroenterology, All India Institute of Medical Sciences, New Delhi, India.No affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Research Support, N.I.H., Extramural
Review

Language

eng

PubMed ID

24236989

Citation

Mouli, V P., and A N. Ananthakrishnan. "Review Article: Vitamin D and Inflammatory Bowel Diseases." Alimentary Pharmacology & Therapeutics, vol. 39, no. 2, 2014, pp. 125-36.
Mouli VP, Ananthakrishnan AN. Review article: vitamin D and inflammatory bowel diseases. Aliment Pharmacol Ther. 2014;39(2):125-36.
Mouli, V. P., & Ananthakrishnan, A. N. (2014). Review article: vitamin D and inflammatory bowel diseases. Alimentary Pharmacology & Therapeutics, 39(2), pp. 125-36. doi:10.1111/apt.12553.
Mouli VP, Ananthakrishnan AN. Review Article: Vitamin D and Inflammatory Bowel Diseases. Aliment Pharmacol Ther. 2014;39(2):125-36. PubMed PMID: 24236989.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Review article: vitamin D and inflammatory bowel diseases. AU - Mouli,V P, AU - Ananthakrishnan,A N, Y1 - 2013/11/17/ PY - 2013/09/27/received PY - 2013/10/15/revised PY - 2013/10/26/revised PY - 2013/10/28/accepted PY - 2013/11/19/entrez PY - 2013/11/19/pubmed PY - 2014/10/8/medline SP - 125 EP - 36 JF - Alimentary pharmacology & therapeutics JO - Aliment. Pharmacol. Ther. VL - 39 IS - 2 N2 - BACKGROUND: Vitamin D is traditionally associated with bone metabolism. The immunological effects of vitamin D have increasingly come into focus. AIM: To review the evidence supporting a role of vitamin D in inflammatory bowel diseases. METHODS: A comprehensive search was performed on PubMed using the terms 'crohn's disease' 'ulcerative colitis' and 'vitamin D'. RESULTS: Vitamin D deficiency is common in patients with inflammatory bowel diseases (IBD) (16-95%) including those with recently diagnosed disease. Evidence supports immunological role of vitamin D in IBD. In animal models, deficiency of vitamin D increases susceptibility to dextran sodium sulphate colitis, while 1,25(OH)2 D3 ameliorates such colitis. One prospective cohort study found low predicted vitamin D levels to be associated with an increased risk of Crohn's disease (CD). Limited data also suggest an association between low vitamin D levels and increased disease activity, particularly in CD. In a large cohort, vitamin D deficiency (<20 ng/mL) was associated with increased risk of surgery (OR 1.8, 95% CI 1.2-2.5) in CD and hospitalisations in both CD (OR 2.1, 95% CI 1.6-2.7) and UC (OR 2.3, 95% CI 1.7-3.1). A single randomised controlled trial demonstrated that vitamin D supplementation may be associated with reduced frequency of relapses in patients with CD compared with placebo (13% vs. 29%, P = 0.06). CONCLUSIONS: There is growing epidemiological evidence to suggest a role for vitamin D deficiency in the development of IBD and also its influence on disease severity. The possible therapeutic role of vitamin D in patients with IBD merits continued investigation. SN - 1365-2036 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/24236989/Review_article:_vitamin_D_and_inflammatory_bowel_diseases_ L2 - https://doi.org/10.1111/apt.12553 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -