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Does frequency-dependence determine male morph survival in the bulb mite Rhizoglyphus robini?
Exp Appl Acarol 2014; 62(4):425-36EA

Abstract

Alternative reproductive phenotypes (ARPs) represent discrete morphological variation within a single sex; as such ARPs are an excellent study system to investigate the maintenance of phenotypic variation. ARPs are traditionally modelled as a mixture of pure strategies or as a conditional strategy. Most male dimorphisms are controlled by a conditional strategy, where males develop into a particular phenotype as a result of their condition which allows them to reach a certain threshold. Individuals that are unable to reach the threshold of a conditional strategy are considered to 'make the best of a bad job'; however, these individuals can have their own fitness merits. Given these fitness merits, condition-dependent selection alone is not sufficient to maintain a conditionally determined male dimorphism and other mechanisms, most likely frequency-dependent selection, are required. We studied in an experiment, the male dimorphic bulb mite Rhizoglyphus robini-where males are fighters that can kill other males or benign scramblers-to assess the strength of frequency-dependent survival in a high and low-quality environment. We found that male survival was frequency-dependent in the high-quality environment but not the low-quality environment. In the high-quality environment the survival curves of the two morphs crossed but the direction of frequency-dependence was opposite to what theory predicts.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Department of Zoology, University of Oxford, The Tinbergen Building, South Parks Road, Oxford, OX1 3PS, UK, jacques.deere@zoo.ox.ac.uk.No affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't

Language

eng

PubMed ID

24248909

Citation

Deere, Jacques A., and Isabel M. Smallegange. "Does Frequency-dependence Determine Male Morph Survival in the Bulb Mite Rhizoglyphus Robini?" Experimental & Applied Acarology, vol. 62, no. 4, 2014, pp. 425-36.
Deere JA, Smallegange IM. Does frequency-dependence determine male morph survival in the bulb mite Rhizoglyphus robini? Exp Appl Acarol. 2014;62(4):425-36.
Deere, J. A., & Smallegange, I. M. (2014). Does frequency-dependence determine male morph survival in the bulb mite Rhizoglyphus robini? Experimental & Applied Acarology, 62(4), pp. 425-36. doi:10.1007/s10493-013-9751-1.
Deere JA, Smallegange IM. Does Frequency-dependence Determine Male Morph Survival in the Bulb Mite Rhizoglyphus Robini. Exp Appl Acarol. 2014;62(4):425-36. PubMed PMID: 24248909.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Does frequency-dependence determine male morph survival in the bulb mite Rhizoglyphus robini? AU - Deere,Jacques A, AU - Smallegange,Isabel M, Y1 - 2013/11/19/ PY - 2013/05/20/received PY - 2013/11/01/accepted PY - 2013/11/20/entrez PY - 2013/11/20/pubmed PY - 2014/10/30/medline SP - 425 EP - 36 JF - Experimental & applied acarology JO - Exp. Appl. Acarol. VL - 62 IS - 4 N2 - Alternative reproductive phenotypes (ARPs) represent discrete morphological variation within a single sex; as such ARPs are an excellent study system to investigate the maintenance of phenotypic variation. ARPs are traditionally modelled as a mixture of pure strategies or as a conditional strategy. Most male dimorphisms are controlled by a conditional strategy, where males develop into a particular phenotype as a result of their condition which allows them to reach a certain threshold. Individuals that are unable to reach the threshold of a conditional strategy are considered to 'make the best of a bad job'; however, these individuals can have their own fitness merits. Given these fitness merits, condition-dependent selection alone is not sufficient to maintain a conditionally determined male dimorphism and other mechanisms, most likely frequency-dependent selection, are required. We studied in an experiment, the male dimorphic bulb mite Rhizoglyphus robini-where males are fighters that can kill other males or benign scramblers-to assess the strength of frequency-dependent survival in a high and low-quality environment. We found that male survival was frequency-dependent in the high-quality environment but not the low-quality environment. In the high-quality environment the survival curves of the two morphs crossed but the direction of frequency-dependence was opposite to what theory predicts. SN - 1572-9702 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/24248909/Does_frequency_dependence_determine_male_morph_survival_in_the_bulb_mite_Rhizoglyphus_robini L2 - https://doi.org/10.1007/s10493-013-9751-1 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -