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Interaction between serum BDNF and aerobic fitness predicts recognition memory in healthy young adults.
Behav Brain Res. 2014 Feb 01; 259:302-12.BB

Abstract

Convergent evidence from human and non-human animal studies suggests aerobic exercise and increased aerobic capacity may be beneficial for brain health and cognition. It is thought growth factors may mediate this putative relationship, particularly by augmenting plasticity mechanisms in the hippocampus, a brain region critical for learning and memory. Among these factors, glucocorticoids, brain derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF), insulin-like growth factor-1 (IGF-1), and vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF), hormones that have considerable and diverse physiological importance, are thought to effect normal and exercise-induced hippocampal plasticity. Despite these predictions, relatively few published human studies have tested hypotheses that relate exercise and fitness to the hippocampus, and none have considered the potential links to all of these hormonal components. Here we present cross-sectional data from a study of recognition memory; serum BDNF, cortisol, IGF-1, and VEGF levels; and aerobic capacity in healthy young adults. We measured circulating levels of these hormones together with performance on a recognition memory task, and a standard graded treadmill test of aerobic fitness. Regression analyses demonstrated BDNF and aerobic fitness predict recognition memory in an interactive manner. In addition, IGF-1 was positively associated with aerobic fitness, but not with recognition memory. Our results may suggest an exercise adaptation-related change in the BDNF dose-response curve that relates to hippocampal memory.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Department of Psychology and Center for Memory & Brain, Boston University, 2 Cummington Mall, Boston, MA 02215, USA.Exercise and Health Sciences Department, College of Nursing and Health Sciences, University of Massachusetts Boston, 100 Morrissey Blvd., Boston, MA 02125, USA.Department of Medicine, Section of Endocrinology, Diabetes and Nutrition, Boston University School of Medicine, 85 East Newton Street, Boston, MA 02118, USA.Department of Medicine, Section of Endocrinology, Diabetes and Nutrition, Boston University School of Medicine, 85 East Newton Street, Boston, MA 02118, USA.Sargent College of Health and Rehabilitation Sciences, Boston University, 635 Commonwealth Avenue, Boston, MA 02215, USA.Department of Psychology and Center for Memory & Brain, Boston University, 2 Cummington Mall, Boston, MA 02215, USA.Department of Psychology and Center for Memory & Brain, Boston University, 2 Cummington Mall, Boston, MA 02215, USA; Department of Anatomy and Neurobiology, Boston University School of Medicine, 650 Albany Street, Boston, MA 02118, USA. Electronic address: kschon@bu.edu.

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Research Support, N.I.H., Extramural
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't

Language

eng

PubMed ID

24269495

Citation

Whiteman, Andrew S., et al. "Interaction Between Serum BDNF and Aerobic Fitness Predicts Recognition Memory in Healthy Young Adults." Behavioural Brain Research, vol. 259, 2014, pp. 302-12.
Whiteman AS, Young DE, He X, et al. Interaction between serum BDNF and aerobic fitness predicts recognition memory in healthy young adults. Behav Brain Res. 2014;259:302-12.
Whiteman, A. S., Young, D. E., He, X., Chen, T. C., Wagenaar, R. C., Stern, C. E., & Schon, K. (2014). Interaction between serum BDNF and aerobic fitness predicts recognition memory in healthy young adults. Behavioural Brain Research, 259, 302-12. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.bbr.2013.11.023
Whiteman AS, et al. Interaction Between Serum BDNF and Aerobic Fitness Predicts Recognition Memory in Healthy Young Adults. Behav Brain Res. 2014 Feb 1;259:302-12. PubMed PMID: 24269495.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Interaction between serum BDNF and aerobic fitness predicts recognition memory in healthy young adults. AU - Whiteman,Andrew S, AU - Young,Daniel E, AU - He,Xuemei, AU - Chen,Tai C, AU - Wagenaar,Robert C, AU - Stern,Chantal E, AU - Schon,Karin, Y1 - 2013/11/21/ PY - 2013/07/22/received PY - 2013/10/16/revised PY - 2013/11/13/accepted PY - 2013/11/26/entrez PY - 2013/11/26/pubmed PY - 2014/8/5/medline KW - ACSM KW - American College of Sports Medicine KW - BDNF KW - BMI KW - Cardiovascular fitness KW - DMS KW - ELISA KW - Hippocampus KW - IGF-1 KW - MTL KW - OLS KW - RER KW - RERmax KW - Recognition memory KW - SMT KW - VEGF KW - body mass index KW - brain-derived neurotrophic factor KW - delayed matching-to-sample KW - enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay KW - insulin-like growth factor-1 KW - max KW - maximum observed respiratory exchange ratio KW - medial temporal lobes KW - ordinary least squares KW - peak KW - peak rate of oxygen consumption in mL per kg of body weight per min, measured during test KW - rate of maximal oxygen consumption in mL per kg of body weight per min KW - respiratory exchange ratio KW - subsequent memory test KW - vascular endothelial growth factor SP - 302 EP - 12 JF - Behavioural brain research JO - Behav. Brain Res. VL - 259 N2 - Convergent evidence from human and non-human animal studies suggests aerobic exercise and increased aerobic capacity may be beneficial for brain health and cognition. It is thought growth factors may mediate this putative relationship, particularly by augmenting plasticity mechanisms in the hippocampus, a brain region critical for learning and memory. Among these factors, glucocorticoids, brain derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF), insulin-like growth factor-1 (IGF-1), and vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF), hormones that have considerable and diverse physiological importance, are thought to effect normal and exercise-induced hippocampal plasticity. Despite these predictions, relatively few published human studies have tested hypotheses that relate exercise and fitness to the hippocampus, and none have considered the potential links to all of these hormonal components. Here we present cross-sectional data from a study of recognition memory; serum BDNF, cortisol, IGF-1, and VEGF levels; and aerobic capacity in healthy young adults. We measured circulating levels of these hormones together with performance on a recognition memory task, and a standard graded treadmill test of aerobic fitness. Regression analyses demonstrated BDNF and aerobic fitness predict recognition memory in an interactive manner. In addition, IGF-1 was positively associated with aerobic fitness, but not with recognition memory. Our results may suggest an exercise adaptation-related change in the BDNF dose-response curve that relates to hippocampal memory. SN - 1872-7549 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/24269495/Interaction_between_serum_BDNF_and_aerobic_fitness_predicts_recognition_memory_in_healthy_young_adults_ L2 - https://linkinghub.elsevier.com/retrieve/pii/S0166-4328(13)00710-9 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -