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Mediterranean diet and cognitive decline. A lesson from the whole-diet approach: what challenges lie ahead?
J Alzheimers Dis. 2014; 39(2):283-6.JA

Abstract

Higher adherence to a Mediterranean-type diet was associated with decreased cognitive decline, although the Mediterranean diet (MeDi) combines several foods, micronutrients, and macronutrients already separately proposed as potential protective factors against dementia and predementia syndromes. The findings from prospective studies and very recent systematic reviews and meta-analyses suggested that adherence to the MeDi fulfilling the whole-diet approach may affect not only the risk of Alzheimer's disease, but also of predementia syndromes and their progression to overt dementia. However, some concerns exist regarding how these instruments have been developed for measuring adherence to the MeDi, suggesting a better qualitative and quantitative selection of the individual dietary components and/or food groups to improve their reliability.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Geriatric Medicine-Memory Unit and Rare Disease Centre, University of Bari Aldo Moro, Bari, Italy.Neurodegenerative Disease Unit, Department of Basic Medicine, Neuroscience, and Sense Organs, University of Bari Aldo Moro, Bari, Italy Department of Clinical Research in Neurology, University of Bari Aldo Moro, "Pia Fondazione Cardinale G. Panico", Tricase, Lecce, Italy.

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Comment

Language

eng

PubMed ID

24270209

Citation

Solfrizzi, Vincenzo, and Francesco Panza. "Mediterranean Diet and Cognitive Decline. a Lesson From the Whole-diet Approach: what Challenges Lie Ahead?" Journal of Alzheimer's Disease : JAD, vol. 39, no. 2, 2014, pp. 283-6.
Solfrizzi V, Panza F. Mediterranean diet and cognitive decline. A lesson from the whole-diet approach: what challenges lie ahead? J Alzheimers Dis. 2014;39(2):283-6.
Solfrizzi, V., & Panza, F. (2014). Mediterranean diet and cognitive decline. A lesson from the whole-diet approach: what challenges lie ahead? Journal of Alzheimer's Disease : JAD, 39(2), 283-6. https://doi.org/10.3233/JAD-130831
Solfrizzi V, Panza F. Mediterranean Diet and Cognitive Decline. a Lesson From the Whole-diet Approach: what Challenges Lie Ahead. J Alzheimers Dis. 2014;39(2):283-6. PubMed PMID: 24270209.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Mediterranean diet and cognitive decline. A lesson from the whole-diet approach: what challenges lie ahead? AU - Solfrizzi,Vincenzo, AU - Panza,Francesco, PY - 2013/11/26/entrez PY - 2013/11/26/pubmed PY - 2014/10/22/medline KW - Alzheimer's disease KW - Mediterranean diet KW - meta-analysis KW - mild cognitive impairment KW - systematic review SP - 283 EP - 6 JF - Journal of Alzheimer's disease : JAD JO - J Alzheimers Dis VL - 39 IS - 2 N2 - Higher adherence to a Mediterranean-type diet was associated with decreased cognitive decline, although the Mediterranean diet (MeDi) combines several foods, micronutrients, and macronutrients already separately proposed as potential protective factors against dementia and predementia syndromes. The findings from prospective studies and very recent systematic reviews and meta-analyses suggested that adherence to the MeDi fulfilling the whole-diet approach may affect not only the risk of Alzheimer's disease, but also of predementia syndromes and their progression to overt dementia. However, some concerns exist regarding how these instruments have been developed for measuring adherence to the MeDi, suggesting a better qualitative and quantitative selection of the individual dietary components and/or food groups to improve their reliability. SN - 1875-8908 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/24270209/Mediterranean_diet_and_cognitive_decline__A_lesson_from_the_whole_diet_approach:_what_challenges_lie_ahead DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -