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Unexpected association between joint hypermobility syndrome/Ehlers-Danlos syndrome hypermobility type and obsessive-compulsive personality disorder.
Rheumatol Int 2014; 34(5):631-6RI

Abstract

Joint hypermobility syndrome/Ehlers-Danlos syndrome hypermobility type (JHS/EDS-HT) is a largely unrecognized, heritable connective tissue disorder, mainly characterized by joint instability complications, widespread musculoskeletal pain, and minor skin features. In a case-control study, 47 consecutive JHS/EDS-HT patients were investigated for the prevalence of psychiatric disorders and compared to 45 healthy controls in a single center. The psychiatric evaluation consisted of structured clinical interview for DSM-IV criteria by using the SCID-I and the SCID-II. Symptom severity was assessed using the Hamilton Anxiety Rating Scale (HAM-A), the Hamilton Depression Rating Scale (HAM-D), and the Brief Psychiatric Rating Scale (BPRS). The Global Assessment of Functioning Scale (GAF) was used to assess the overall severity of psychological, social, and occupational functions. JHS/EDS-HT patients had significantly higher mean scores for all questionnaires: HAM-A (6.7 vs. 3.8), HAM-D (6.4 vs. 2.7), GAF (75.0 vs. 86.1), and BPRS (27.5 vs. 25.6). The JHS/EDS-HT group had a 4.3 higher risk of being affected by any psychiatric disorder, and in particular, a 5.8 higher risk of having a personality disorder. In particular, 5 JHS/EDS-HT suffered from obsessive-compulsive personality disorder with an observed prevalence rate of 10.6 % (3.6-23.1). Psychiatric assessment of JHS/EDS-HT patients showed an extremely high prevalence of personality disorders (21 %), and of Axis-I disorders (38 %), mostly depressive. This study did not confirm the previously reported increased rate of panic disorders in JHS/EDS-HT.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Department of Neurology and Psychiatry, Umberto I Hospital, Sapienza University of Rome, Rome, Italy.No affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article

Language

eng

PubMed ID

24272065

Citation

Pasquini, Massimo, et al. "Unexpected Association Between Joint Hypermobility syndrome/Ehlers-Danlos Syndrome Hypermobility Type and Obsessive-compulsive Personality Disorder." Rheumatology International, vol. 34, no. 5, 2014, pp. 631-6.
Pasquini M, Celletti C, Berardelli I, et al. Unexpected association between joint hypermobility syndrome/Ehlers-Danlos syndrome hypermobility type and obsessive-compulsive personality disorder. Rheumatol Int. 2014;34(5):631-6.
Pasquini, M., Celletti, C., Berardelli, I., Roselli, V., Mastroeni, S., Castori, M., ... Camerota, F. (2014). Unexpected association between joint hypermobility syndrome/Ehlers-Danlos syndrome hypermobility type and obsessive-compulsive personality disorder. Rheumatology International, 34(5), pp. 631-6. doi:10.1007/s00296-013-2901-2.
Pasquini M, et al. Unexpected Association Between Joint Hypermobility syndrome/Ehlers-Danlos Syndrome Hypermobility Type and Obsessive-compulsive Personality Disorder. Rheumatol Int. 2014;34(5):631-6. PubMed PMID: 24272065.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Unexpected association between joint hypermobility syndrome/Ehlers-Danlos syndrome hypermobility type and obsessive-compulsive personality disorder. AU - Pasquini,Massimo, AU - Celletti,Claudia, AU - Berardelli,Isabella, AU - Roselli,Valentina, AU - Mastroeni,Simona, AU - Castori,Marco, AU - Biondi,Massimo, AU - Camerota,Filippo, Y1 - 2013/11/23/ PY - 2012/09/22/received PY - 2013/11/06/accepted PY - 2013/11/26/entrez PY - 2013/11/26/pubmed PY - 2014/12/15/medline SP - 631 EP - 6 JF - Rheumatology international JO - Rheumatol. Int. VL - 34 IS - 5 N2 - Joint hypermobility syndrome/Ehlers-Danlos syndrome hypermobility type (JHS/EDS-HT) is a largely unrecognized, heritable connective tissue disorder, mainly characterized by joint instability complications, widespread musculoskeletal pain, and minor skin features. In a case-control study, 47 consecutive JHS/EDS-HT patients were investigated for the prevalence of psychiatric disorders and compared to 45 healthy controls in a single center. The psychiatric evaluation consisted of structured clinical interview for DSM-IV criteria by using the SCID-I and the SCID-II. Symptom severity was assessed using the Hamilton Anxiety Rating Scale (HAM-A), the Hamilton Depression Rating Scale (HAM-D), and the Brief Psychiatric Rating Scale (BPRS). The Global Assessment of Functioning Scale (GAF) was used to assess the overall severity of psychological, social, and occupational functions. JHS/EDS-HT patients had significantly higher mean scores for all questionnaires: HAM-A (6.7 vs. 3.8), HAM-D (6.4 vs. 2.7), GAF (75.0 vs. 86.1), and BPRS (27.5 vs. 25.6). The JHS/EDS-HT group had a 4.3 higher risk of being affected by any psychiatric disorder, and in particular, a 5.8 higher risk of having a personality disorder. In particular, 5 JHS/EDS-HT suffered from obsessive-compulsive personality disorder with an observed prevalence rate of 10.6 % (3.6-23.1). Psychiatric assessment of JHS/EDS-HT patients showed an extremely high prevalence of personality disorders (21 %), and of Axis-I disorders (38 %), mostly depressive. This study did not confirm the previously reported increased rate of panic disorders in JHS/EDS-HT. SN - 1437-160X UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/24272065/Unexpected_association_between_joint_hypermobility_syndrome/Ehlers_Danlos_syndrome_hypermobility_type_and_obsessive_compulsive_personality_disorder_ L2 - https://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s00296-013-2901-2 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -